Beginner Help?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 19, 2013 2:31 AM GMT
    So I'm trying to start a cycling hobby. I have no experience. (Never rode, never had a bike). My family has an old bike, but I don't know if it would be better to work with that, or get a new one. It's not in bad condition, the frame is good, and it was barely used. Other than replacing the tires, and maybe the brakes, it may be good. (But I don't actually know)

    I also don't want to spend too much since I don't know what I want yet.

    I'm looking for a local store that can help me out, but a lot of them seem too high end for a beginner.

    Anyone willing to help or refer me to a site that can?
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    Jun 19, 2013 12:00 PM GMT
    If you've never riden before, the first thing you'll want to do is use adult training wheels to practice balance and stability.
    http://www.sportsauthority.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11366250
    pTSA-9752553reg.jpg

    Order those. Then when they arrive, do a search for bike shops in your area to install them and fix up the bike to make it rideable.

    Also make sure to get a helmet, and wear long pants and long sleeves, because it's inevitable that you will fall over a few times during the learning process (that also applies to experienced riders learning new tricks - falling is just part of the game).
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    Jun 19, 2013 11:39 PM GMT
    Unintended saidTechnology will make a big difference in your enjoyment level. This does not mean a big investment, but having a bike with shifters that work and brakes that don't require a Gorilla grip to stop will not only avoid frustration but keep you safe.

    However, without more details about your old bike or how much you are willing to spend, better advise is impossible.

    Last Saturday, after my ride I was at a station waiting for the train to come back to the city. This somewhat naive guy looked at my bike and said "how much did that cost, about 6?"

    I said "7, Thousand."

    To me, that is not a lot to spend on a fantastic full-suspending 29er mountain bike that will last me years. Other might not agree.


    icon_eek.gif I was honestly hoping to keep the price in the $100-$300 range. I can't afford any more than that. The bike would mostly be for general transportation, but it would be nice to explore some of the bike paths nearby. As for the old bike, it says it's a 12 speed bike. But other than that, it's so old, that I honestly don't know.
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    Jun 20, 2013 1:54 AM GMT
    WaytoDawn said
    Unintended saidTechnology will make a big difference in your enjoyment level. This does not mean a big investment, but having a bike with shifters that work and brakes that don't require a Gorilla grip to stop will not only avoid frustration but keep you safe.

    However, without more details about your old bike or how much you are willing to spend, better advise is impossible.

    Last Saturday, after my ride I was at a station waiting for the train to come back to the city. This somewhat naive guy looked at my bike and said "how much did that cost, about 6?"

    I said "7, Thousand."

    To me, that is not a lot to spend on a fantastic full-suspending 29er mountain bike that will last me years. Other might not agree.


    icon_eek.gif I was honestly hoping to keep the price in the $100-$300 range. I can't afford any more than that. The bike would mostly be for general transportation, but it would be nice to explore some of the bike paths nearby. As for the old bike, it says it's a 12 speed bike. But other than that, it's so old, that I honestly don't know.
    12 speed, 21 speed, 30 speed, 33 speed, 3 speed, 1 speed...it doesn't matter. If you can crank the pedals, and all other components operate, you can ride it. Brakes are only there to allow a faster ride with faster stopping. No brakes means you have to pre-plan the stopping points and use other methods to decelerate.

    In fact, I'm about to run to Wal-Mart in a few minutes to pick up a ~$120 bike (26") just to learn new tricks..and partially because I get tired of riding my expensive bike around town and hoping nobody knocks me in the head to take it. icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 20, 2013 2:09 AM GMT
    There is a Yahoo group called FREECYCLE. You can post for stuff you are looking for and people also post for things they are offering...for FREE. I've seen ipods, cameras, bicycles, bales of hay, pickled string beans, rubber bands and wrapping paper being offered - the list is endless. I've also scored some great free stuff from the site. It is done by region and you have several choices (Irvine, Anaheim, Fullerton...) at http://www.freecycle.org/group/US/California

    People pay attention to those in need, so go ahead and put your beginner story in your post -you could land a really great bike for free.

    Best wishes!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 29, 2013 6:07 AM GMT
    do they still make Huffys ?;)

    don't get one .

    ----

    i'd have a complete tune up done on the old bike and start with that.
    If it develops into a passion, you'll find the money, if not, well you won't have wasted any.