Perfectly imperfect!

  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1116

    Jun 23, 2013 3:20 PM GMT

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    No two snowflakes are alike as each snowflake takes its own perfect form during its journey, while at the end of its journey both the perfectly and the not so perfectly shaped one both melt into the same body of fluidity. And while gravity pulls them down into the same shared destination, the expansive space in the air as they reach the ground, gives each snowflake the opportunity to take their own path/shape!

    Along this gravity-driven journey, some snowflakes collide and damage each other, some collide and join together, some are influenced by wind. There are so many transitions and changes that take place along this journey of the snowflake, that we humans know as Life. But, no matter what the transition, we humans much like the snowflake always finds their identity perfectly shaped for its journey.

    I find parallels in nature to be a beautiful reflection of grand orchestration. One of these parallels is of snowflakes and us. We, too, are all headed in the same direction. We are being driven by a universal force to the same destination. We are all individuals taking different journeys and along our journey, we sometimes bump into each other, we cross paths, we become altered; meanwhile at all times we remain 100% perfectly imperfect!?

    In coming to recognize my own imperfections I have come into the realization of a much broader and deeper view of my “self”. Without that my growth would be filled with many unseen gaps, like the countless little bubbles of air that lies between each brick layers of my being, that more often then not neither I nor the person who may stand in front of me may see or fail to recognize the most tiny imperfections, that lies hidden between each solid brick, that from afar makes me look standing tall and strong!? I know that in time the wall may loosen up, crumble, or even come apart, meanwhile from afar I still look and even feel as if I am standing tall and strong!? Yet like a brick wall I am also susceptible to changes due to my environment! nonetheless even if I may crumble, loosen up, or fall apart, I still continue to serve a purpose in an imperfect world!

    Within my own perfectly structured fortress I have walls that are crumbling down everyday! Yet these same walls are covered with the finger prints of aging, pains, suffering, struggles, and those people who have touched or tried to remove those bricks. But I have learned to be flexible and adapt to changes fairly quickly, so that my legacy will continue on for ages to come, I hope!

    The brick walls that once stood strong all by themselves are now covered with the fingerprints of many life forms within each of its weakest links, cracks, or loosen bricks. Fingerprints of vines, some of which are the flowering kind, that at this point in my life adorns the walls of my being in a perfectly imperfect symmetry of stunning and breathtaking beauty. So thank you to those who have in some way touched and ventured into my outer and inner walls. If it wasn't because of you I couldn't see and accept the perfections of my imperfect self; all in all I no more and no less am a uniquely perfect person. So bring on the snow covered walls, the weathered worn brick layers, the vine covered walls; for it all have helped me become agelessly beautiful, and useful, so I hope!?

    Leandro
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    Jun 24, 2013 2:02 AM GMT
    Ivy will insinuate its root system into a brick wall. If you try to remove the ivy, the mortar may crumble. Leave it intact, and the wall may stand for hundreds of years. Is the ivy damaging the wall -- a parasite that sucks the very marrow from its bones? Or are the two an inseparable system in perfect balance, the wall lending support to the ivy, the ivy making the wall more beautiful?
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1116

    Jun 24, 2013 2:42 AM GMT
    shortbutsweet saidIvy will insinuate its root system into a brick wall. If you try to remove the ivy, the mortar may crumble. Leave it intact, and the wall may stand for hundreds of years. Is the ivy damaging the wall -- a parasite that sucks the very marrow from its bones? Or are the two an inseparable system in perfect balance, the wall lending support to the ivy, the ivy making the wall more beautiful?


    Thank you for your well thought out analogy! one can find strength in what from a distance may seem delicate and fragile. Although at the same time what appears strong and indestructible can also benefit from the unseen strengths of what is perceived as delicate and fragile!

    The strength of an ivy cannot be seeing, for it is hidden deep within its massive roots system. The solid feel of a brick wall may look strongest, but time will reveal its weakness as it crumbles. Although there is a certain charm or admiration of how beautiful it ages as it crumbles, as it gives in to the added strength of the more delicate and fragile Ivy vine! such is my understanding of Love sometimes. I have learned that strengths and weaknesses from either parties involved can compliment, and function in the same way a wall and the ivy vine do with each other! thank you Shortbusweet for sharing!!
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Jun 24, 2013 2:46 AM GMT
    shortbutsweet saidIvy will insinuate its root system into a brick wall. If you try to remove the ivy, the mortar may crumble. Leave it intact, and the wall may stand for hundreds of years. Is the ivy damaging the wall -- a parasite that sucks the very marrow from its bones? Or are the two an inseparable system in perfect balance, the wall lending support to the ivy, the ivy making the wall more beautiful?


    Ivy is one of my favorite plants. There is a pub in the TC that I've been to - it and all the buildings around it in a little courtyard area have ivy growing all over their walls, and when the wind blows through it makes the walls look alive.
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1116

    Jun 24, 2013 3:04 AM GMT
    Rhi_Bran said
    shortbutsweet saidIvy will insinuate its root system into a brick wall. If you try to remove the ivy, the mortar may crumble. Leave it intact, and the wall may stand for hundreds of years. Is the ivy damaging the wall -- a parasite that sucks the very marrow from its bones? Or are the two an inseparable system in perfect balance, the wall lending support to the ivy, the ivy making the wall more beautiful?


    Ivy is one of my favorite plants. There is a pub in the TC that I've been to - it and all the buildings around it in a little courtyard area have ivy growing all over their walls, and when the wind blows through it makes the walls look alive.


    Have you ever been to Boston. Mass!? I went in April to pay my niece a visit. She is attending Boston University. I was walking the vicinity around her campus, and there were many brick row houses covered in Ivy. It was breathtaking to say the least! Some of those Ivy covered buildings are well over a hundred years old.