My lower back hurts when I run

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 12:44 PM GMT
    I hate running. I've had to do it for years in the military and I've always hated it. But I've come to the realization that running on a treadmill is not the same as running outside.

    So I've been running, a little off road and and little on road. The problem in my lower back hurts. In fact, it hurt long after my run too. It felt like a sharp stabbing pain on my left side of my lower back, where the hip bone comes closest to the surface I guess.

    Whats the deal Runners and how do I fix it? What am I doing wrong?
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Sep 10, 2007 2:15 PM GMT
    Crim it could be the running shoes. Also many people have different length legs, even if it is a slight difference it will cause pain where you describe. Good luck with it.

    Mike
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 5:02 PM GMT


    It could be somethign as simple as your posture when you are running, are you leaning forward too much/too little, are you too rigid and are bouncing too much.

    Have a "runner" go for a run with you, or look at you while you run on a treadmill. That's a simple fix... but of course there could be a medical thing as well, so don't discount a dr visit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 5:05 PM GMT
    It ain't the shoes. I went to a special Running Shoe Store, where thier podatrist watches you run and walk and measures your feet. I've never had such good shoes.

    I might be the posture. How to I alternate this?
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Sep 10, 2007 7:04 PM GMT
    As mentioned already, you're probably leaning forward. You should try to get your pelvis into a more neutral position, tuck in your stomach, and retract your shoulder blades. Get that weight back over your heels. When you watch elite runners, there's as much action going on in front of their pelvis as behind it. When you watch non-runners, it's usually all behind the pelvis. Eventually, that will wreak havoc on your lower back and your knees.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 7:16 PM GMT
    Crim's pelvis is never neutral.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 8:00 PM GMT
    OW, you can have my pelvis in any position you want, as long as you promise not to be gentle.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 8:12 PM GMT
    Just keep repeating these words: "Fuck me,
    Dubya...Oh yeah, you're the king, Dubya. Yeah, fuck me, Dubya."
  • DrStorm

    Posts: 185

    Sep 10, 2007 8:17 PM GMT
    I got myself new shoes AND I see a chiropractor every 6-8 weeks for a "check-up"...I am running better, faster, longer than ever before at 41 and PAIN FREE!

    Hell, I did my first half iron-man triathlon yesterday and my back wasn't the issue...it was those damn knees that were the problem!

    Absolutely no back pains from the race!

    'nuff said.


    daWeatherMan
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 8:20 PM GMT
    Thanks Dr. Storm, but until I get my PhD or MD, I wont be able to afford a chiropractor for a long time.

    OW, kinky. But I've served in Iraq, so I've already been fucked by Dubya. You get sloppy seconds.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 10, 2007 8:26 PM GMT
    Story of my life.

    Is there a chiropractic school near you? Maybe you can get cracked by a student. Of course, you may end up paralyzed for life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 2:12 AM GMT
    "It could be somethign as simple as your posture when you are running, are you leaning forward too much/too little, are you too rigid and are bouncing too much."

    Now there's an idea! Crimthann, make sure you are fully erect when running!

    Other than that, just get yourself a back and boody rub, I am sure you can get someone to do it free.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 2:13 AM GMT
    heh, I meant body rub
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 3:22 AM GMT
    Sadly, no one to rub anything on me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 3:40 AM GMT
    I have the same problem when I ride my bike, but not when I run. The suggestions about posture are great but, what has helped for me is taking two ibuprofen before my workout.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 5:36 AM GMT
    "Crimthann:Sadly, no one to rub anything on me."

    boyfriend?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 9:59 AM GMT
    You are in boston area, seek trigger point therapy and have your glutes checked minimus and medius. They can do some damage on your lover back.


    For Dr. Storm if you had back pain and now knee pain, do the same and have the adductors checked for TP.

    I hope this helps.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 11:03 AM GMT
    I have the same thing when i run on a hard surface...and I suffer from a bulging disk at L5. So i cant run on pavement...i actually run on a treadmill and dont have the pain. Most treadmills have built in cushion and shock absorbers..well, the good ones do...I cant run on a Precor Treadmill because I get the same pain in my back as if I were on pavement. You may suffer from a bulging disk as well and a Chiropractor cant help you with that...actually, in my opinion, they cant halp you with much of anything!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 11:12 AM GMT
    OW, I'll look into the chiropractic school.

    A&F, I have one, but he is out of the country, and when he is, we live in different States for most of the year.

    RKS, I'm from the Boston area originally, but I don't live there anymore. Still, I'll take your suggestions and see if I can get someone else to look at me.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 6:14 PM GMT
    Well the solution is simple, don´t run! It is so easy.... If you get sick eating salmon you don´t eat salmon, if you back hurts if youre running, do something else... Why make it so difficult
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 11, 2007 6:56 PM GMT
    I don't have a choice. I literally HAVE to run.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 12, 2007 5:41 AM GMT
    "I have one, but he is out of the country, and when he is, we live in different States for most of the year."

    That sucks!!

    OK, one more stab at it. How about low impact cardio? bike? swim?

    BTW, one way I deal back issues, is to do back hyper extensions slow and through a full range of movement. I find that if I do them on a regular basis I am less likely to strain my back. Don't forget crunches to help you abs support your back better.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 12, 2007 6:08 AM GMT
    Could be the way your feet are landing, some people when running land on the sides of their feet others land flat footed and so on.. Best to maybe go to a professional runners shop and get them to check your running posture and recommend a pair of trainers that would stop it..I know this because i had the same problem. Hope this helps, Simon
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 12, 2007 6:22 AM GMT
    I use to have the same problem with my lower back; it would always ache after I run for a good 5-10 minutes. I did some reading on this and found that after working a lot on my core muscles my back didn't hurt running anymore. You can try doing lots of captain's chairs, crunches, back tucks, whatever it is you do to make your ab/core muscles stronger, and that might help. Worked for me.
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Sep 12, 2007 6:35 AM GMT
    "BTW, one way I deal back issues, is to do back hyper extensions slow and through a full range of movement."

    That exercise might aggravate the problem if there is a pre-existing injury. It's a substantial weight load to bear on a healthy spine, never mind one that's not so healthy.

    Strengthening the back is possible in more limited range of motion, using a stability ball or even just laying down flat on your hips, doing the so-called "Superman." Check out the core-strenghtening exercises on this site.