Grammar: Driver's, Passenger's, Passenger

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2013 4:52 PM GMT
    OK, pick the correct sentences:

    1.

    A. He set the six-pack of beer on the passenger seat.
    B. He set the six-pack of beer on the passenger's seat.


    2.

    A. He opened the car door and sat down on the driver's seat.
    B. He opened the car door and sat down on the driver seat.

    3.

    A. He walked around to the passenger's side of the car.
    B. He walked around to the passenger side of the car.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2013 5:31 PM GMT
    Anyone?
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jun 27, 2013 5:33 PM GMT
    A, A, B
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 27, 2013 5:42 PM GMT
    They're all correct.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jun 27, 2013 5:44 PM GMT
    JohnSpotter saidThey're all correct.

    Yay, everyone wins.

    You get a car, and you get a car, and you get a car!
  • Hothouse

    Posts: 2204

    Jun 27, 2013 5:54 PM GMT
    I'm gonna say A,B,B.

    I want to say "none of the above" just to be a smart ass.

    I also want to say it depends on if someone is in the car, but then it would make more sense to set something on the passenger's lap than on his seat.
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    Jun 27, 2013 6:14 PM GMT
    It's confusing as to which seems right, passenger's or passenger. I read that if you're referring to the seat or window as a physical description, as opposed to its location, you would use passenger. But that doesn't hold true for the driver's window, or driver's seat.

    I placed the bag on the passenger seat.
    (passenger as an adjective to describe which seat)

    I walked over to the passenger's side.
    (denoting location)