Washington, DC: “Children Are Dying”

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 02, 2013 1:11 AM GMT
    "Because of nationwide shortages, Washington hospitals are rationing, hoarding, and bartering critical nutrients premature babies and other patients need to survive. Doctors are reporting conditions normally seen only in developing countries, and there have been deaths. How could this be allowed to happen?"

    http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/people/children-are-dying/index.php
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Jul 02, 2013 1:18 AM GMT
    riddler78 said"Because of nationwide shortages, Washington hospitals are rationing, hoarding, and bartering critical nutrients premature babies and other patients need to survive. Doctors are reporting conditions normally seen only in developing countries, and there have been deaths. How could this be allowed to happen?"

    http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/people/children-are-dying/index.php


    Taxation without representation?
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    Jul 02, 2013 1:28 AM GMT
    "Drug/nutrient shortages are almost always artificial and are the product of greed in the pharmaceutical industry. I've seen all kinds of them during my nursing career. It's all about the fact that they don't make enough money on the particular drugs, and of course, being HUGE business (not just big business) they "can't afford" to do anything pro bono......or even anything that doesn't make them huge profits."

    The above is from the comment section of the Washingtonian article.

    Also from the comments, most of which are from health professionals, it seems obvious that this crisis has been going on for a very long time.
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    Jul 02, 2013 1:31 AM GMT
    Here's another comment worth considering:

    "The author left out a very important point of the article. Hospitals CAN pay more.

    Hospitals are using GPOs to bid down the price, making profit near impossible for the companies making the drugs. Let's say one bottle of a nutrient costs $1 for the hospital. That same hospital is charging you $50 or $100. If you don't believe me, check your bill to see the actual prices hospitals charge.

    Hospitals are supposed to be non-profit institutions. So where does all that profit go? It goes into the pockets of people like the hospital administrations getting paid obscene salaries. It also goes to campaign funds for politicians. The same politicians turning a blind eye to all of this.

    There is no reason why the hospitals could make less profit off of their patients by paying a little more to increase supply of low cost drugs.

    For more information about what I'm talking about, see the Time article:

    Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us

    http://www.time.com/time/magaz..."
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    Jul 02, 2013 12:44 PM GMT
    NewMtler said"Drug/nutrient shortages are almost always artificial and are the product of greed in the pharmaceutical industry. I've seen all kinds of them during my nursing career. It's all about the fact that they don't make enough money on the particular drugs, and of course, being HUGE business (not just big business) they "can't afford" to do anything pro bono......or even anything that doesn't make them huge profits."

    The above is from the comment section of the Washingtonian article.

    Also from the comments, most of which are from health professionals, it seems obvious that this crisis has been going on for a very long time.


    Greed? What if someone decided to cut your pay in half - how would that make you feel? What if their response to you was "too bad, live with it, don't be so greedy?"
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    Jul 02, 2013 2:35 PM GMT
    "Greed? What if someone decided to cut your pay in half "

    Whose pay was cut in half? Who cut the pay?

    What is the explanation for this shortage existing for at least the last 20 years?

    The article itself doesn't seem to have a political agenda. It was also refreshing to read the comments from health professionals who could address the problem from an understanding of how their systems work from a decades long perspective.
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    Jul 02, 2013 2:41 PM GMT
    NewMtler said"Greed? What if someone decided to cut your pay in half "

    Whose pay was cut in half? Who cut the pay?

    What is the explanation for this shortage existing for at least the last 20 years?

    The article itself doesn't seem to have a political agenda. It was also refreshing to read the comments from health professionals who could address the problem from an understanding of how their systems work from a decades long perspective.


    Definitely depressing that this has been an issue - though it seems like it's one that has gotten worse - as the shortages are more recent issues. Sadly it doesn't seem as if there are any moves regulation wise to make it easier to import some of these drugs and products from elsewhere.
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    Jul 02, 2013 3:09 PM GMT
    GOOD NEWS:

    "Jensen says the FDA is working on it and that imported nutrients will be shipped soon: “It took a long time to find companies willing to do it, mainly because they couldn’t meet US needs and didn’t have the ability to ramp up for the US. The good news is we’ve got different firms willing to do this for phosphates, zinc, and trace elements. We moved as quickly as we could.”

    The article credits the Obama administration with pointing out the coming shortages and working to address them quickly.

    Prior administrations were either not aware of the issue or didn't realize the vulnerabilities of manufacturers of these nutrients.
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    Jul 02, 2013 4:20 PM GMT
    NewMtler saidGOOD NEWS:

    "Jensen says the FDA is working on it and that imported nutrients will be shipped soon: “It took a long time to find companies willing to do it, mainly because they couldn’t meet US needs and didn’t have the ability to ramp up for the US. The good news is we’ve got different firms willing to do this for phosphates, zinc, and trace elements. We moved as quickly as we could.”

    The article credits the Obama administration with pointing out the coming shortages and working to address them quickly.

    Prior administrations were either not aware of the issue or didn't realize the vulnerabilities of manufacturers of these nutrients.


    ... how long as the Obama Administration been in office? When were the deaths? Sorry, your claim doesn't track.
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    Jul 02, 2013 7:20 PM GMT
    You may well have special knowledge in this area, especially if you work in neonatal healthcare.
    However, the article you posted clearly gives credit to the Obama administration for helping to mitigate the crisis.

    Additionally, the comments from care professionals seem free of a political bias and make no indictments toward blame other than those directed at certain elements in the industry.

    Are you calling for greater governmental oversight of the industry? What is your expertise in healthcare?
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    Jul 03, 2013 12:50 AM GMT
    NewMtler saidYou may well have special knowledge in this area, especially if you work in neonatal healthcare.
    However, the article you posted clearly gives credit to the Obama administration for helping to mitigate the crisis.

    1. He doesn't have any special knowledge, except for relentlessly bashing Obama from Canada every time he thinks he sees a chance, however weak the case.

    2. Thanks for making his latest Obama bashing blow up in his face, as most of them do, once they're examined. The Obama Administration has worked to resolve a problem that resulted from industry economics (and perhaps greed), not from any government policies.
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    Jul 03, 2013 1:27 AM GMT
    NewMtler saidYou may well have special knowledge in this area, especially if you work in neonatal healthcare.
    However, the article you posted clearly gives credit to the Obama administration for helping to mitigate the crisis.

    Additionally, the comments from care professionals seem free of a political bias and make no indictments toward blame other than those directed at certain elements in the industry.

    Are you calling for greater governmental oversight of the industry? What is your expertise in healthcare?


    Except for the issue as discussed in the article by manufacturers when it comes to increased regulatory policies that have made it either more difficult and/or more expensive to produce these ingredients.

    No comments are free of bias which may be political or otherwise. That being said, the issues they have confirmed is that manufacturers just don't have the incentive to produce some of these components. The irony is that in the article (that apparently some here haven't read) also points to the fact that some of these hospitals have resorted to paying multiples in order to secure supplies. This suggests the issues are not largely ones of supply.