Keeping the core tight

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    Jul 05, 2013 10:43 PM GMT
    During workouts my trainer, or video, whichever is instructing me at the time, keeps beating into my head to keep a tight core, to keep my abs tight. I searched on Google for a good way to make this happen and found the best advice is to laugh. Today I tried that with limited/poor success. Anyone else got any advice based on experience.
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    Jul 05, 2013 10:49 PM GMT
    I know they say Laughter's the Best Medicine, but I would suggest you get your workout routines from somewhere other than Reader's Digest.
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    Jul 05, 2013 10:51 PM GMT
    Scruffypup saidI know they say Laughter's the Best Medicine, but I would suggest you get your workout routines from somewhere other than Reader's Digest.


    What?
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    Jul 05, 2013 11:04 PM GMT
    Be conscious of not letting your tummy bulge when you lift.

    Also, use the cable machine to do a variety of exercises to strengthen the core. Back extensions are also good, and are something a lot of people miss...then they throw out their back.
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    Jul 06, 2013 1:18 AM GMT
    Put two fingers under your belly button. Cough. Feel that muscle tense up? That's the one you want to keep tight (Transverse Abdominus). Imagine you are drawing your belly button backward, in toward your spine.
    Good luck.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Jul 06, 2013 1:26 AM GMT
    Anomalous1 said Imagine you are drawing your belly button backward, in toward your spine.


    This.
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    Jul 06, 2013 1:36 AM GMT
    Imagine pulling your navel back to your spine. And when laying down pull your lower back flat into full contact with the mat .
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    Jul 06, 2013 1:43 AM GMT
    Try doing one arm dumbbell bench presses instead of a two handed barbell. Same with It'll force your core to make up for the uneven weight distribution. Little things like that in your lifting regimen can help.

    You could also do planks. If you can do more than two minutes or so, try holding one leg up off the ground, doing them on one arm to the side with the other in the air, etc etc. Anything that requires your core to work at stabilizing you is good.
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    Jul 06, 2013 1:49 AM GMT
    Keep a tight core.. Just imagine someone is about to punch you in the stomach. So you tense up your abs/torso in anticipation.
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    Jul 06, 2013 3:07 AM GMT
    Big help on keeping your core tight: stand up, keep your posture when you lift. Tuck your lower abs.
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    Jul 06, 2013 4:09 AM GMT
    Bunjamon said
    Anomalous1 said Imagine you are drawing your belly button backward, in toward your spine.


    This.
    +2
  • Jessie_Lee

    Posts: 113

    Jul 06, 2013 4:41 AM GMT
    Inhale when you lower the weight, exhale when you lift it, and suck your midsection in a bit when you exhale. You actually don't need to flex your abs, just actively suck your midsection in.

    The core muscle in question (ask already pointed out by someone else) is the transverse abdominals, not the rectus abdominals that is commonly referred to as the six-pack. Because the modern lifestyle and workplace has people in a seated position almost all the time, the transverse abdominals tends to be any person's weakest point and is a major factor in experiencing back pain.

    Anyways, you need to work on sucking your midsection in a bit. Exhaling while pushing/pulling the weights would help a little, because it would provide extra room for you to suck your midsection in (I'll forgo the details).