Beginner or intermediate?

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    Jul 07, 2013 3:40 PM GMT
    When would you consider yourself a beginner, and when would you consider yourself an intermediate level weight-lifter? Some people say that high reps are for beginners and then once you're no longer considered that and have good form you should switch to low reps and heavy weight.

    I've been working out for a couple of years now and decided about 3-4 weeks ago to try the Big Man On Campus routine on Bodybuilding .com, however it seems to be targeting high reps (10-12) vs low reps (6-icon_cool.gif.

    Based on your experience, do you believe I as a hard gainer who is seeing 'some' results from this routine, should switch to 6-8 reps and heavy weights, or continue the program's current curriculum?

    Any other routines you'd recommend instead?

    Thanks!
  • mybud

    Posts: 11829

    Jul 07, 2013 7:37 PM GMT
    If you've been working out for a couple of years you're not a beginner..If I were you I'd do the 6-8 reps, using good form...go heavy with the weight..Get at least 1 gram of protein per pound of lean mass...Good luck bro.
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    Jul 07, 2013 9:47 PM GMT
    http://www.crossfit.com/cf-journal/WLSTANDARDS.pdf

    To be honest, I think these standards are absurdly high and designed to make people feel inadequate, but some people must swear by them. I would say knock a third off these, and they could be about right.
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    Jul 07, 2013 10:14 PM GMT
    Ohno saidhttp://www.crossfit.com/cf-journal/WLSTANDARDS.pdf

    To be honest, I think these standards are absurdly high and designed to make people feel inadequate, but some people must swear by them. I would say knock a third off these, and they could be about right.


    I'm near some of those numbers, but the squats one I'm way off. Maybe I'm not putting enough effort into leg day, although I'm aware of it's importanceicon_confused.gif
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    Jul 07, 2013 10:17 PM GMT
    Oh seeing as I didn't answer the actual question, low reps are for strength, medium reps are for size and high reps are for lean mass. The number of reps is not really anything to do with experience.
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    Jul 07, 2013 10:44 PM GMT
    Ohno saidOh seeing as I didn't answer the actual question, low reps are for strength, medium reps are for size and high reps are for lean mass. The number of reps is not really anything to do with experience.


    What is the difference between size and lean mass? Shouldn't the difference between lean or not be from diet?
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    Jul 07, 2013 10:47 PM GMT
    tanbod said
    Ohno saidOh seeing as I didn't answer the actual question, low reps are for strength, medium reps are for size and high reps are for lean mass. The number of reps is not really anything to do with experience.


    What is the difference between size and lean mass? Shouldn't the difference between lean or not be from diet?


    You do a lean mass programme of high reps with a low sugar/fat diet to lower body fat and increase definition. You do a mass gaining programme of medium reps with a high calorie high protein diet to increase size.
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    Jul 08, 2013 2:50 AM GMT
    Ohno said
    tanbod said
    Ohno saidOh seeing as I didn't answer the actual question, low reps are for strength, medium reps are for size and high reps are for lean mass. The number of reps is not really anything to do with experience.


    What is the difference between size and lean mass? Shouldn't the difference between lean or not be from diet?


    You do a lean mass programme of high reps with a low sugar/fat diet to lower body fat and increase definition. You do a mass gaining programme of medium reps with a high calorie high protein diet to increase size.


    I'll take the latter, thanks icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 08, 2013 3:03 AM GMT
    If you're like me, you've picked up bad habits that could lead to injury.

    I found a trainer who's into body building and it saved me a fair amount of downtime due to injury. And, he helped me figure out cardio..
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    Jul 08, 2013 3:56 AM GMT
    RobertF64 saidIf you're like me, you've picked up bad habits that could lead to injury.

    I found a trainer who's into body building and it saved me a fair amount of downtime due to injury. And, he helped me figure out cardio..


    I can't say I've been injured in the couple of years I've been working out; however, I know I can definitely benefit from a personal trainer. It's just hard because it's so expensive, and I'm a college student... icon_sad.gif
  • jo2hotbod

    Posts: 3603

    Jul 10, 2013 1:16 AM GMT
    Dude forget high rep beginner, low rep novice, it's all in what ur vials r. Generally if you want definition go high, bulk go low. Switch it up by carrying ur rep scheme. But ultimately do what keeps u interested and what u like, that will keep u in the gym. If u want a schedule rotate between low rep, med rep and high rep every 4 or 5 months
  • Fritter

    Posts: 1696

    Jul 10, 2013 1:19 AM GMT
    I have found myself giving some advice at the gym to others, however I still feel like the Pedawan learner, and not the Master. icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 10, 2013 1:26 AM GMT
    Ohno saidhttp://www.crossfit.com/cf-journal/WLSTANDARDS.pdf

    To be honest, I think these standards are absurdly high and designed to make people feel inadequate, but some people must swear by them. I would say knock a third off these, and they could be about right.


    As a CrossFitter, those are goals, I say what you said above is true
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    Jul 10, 2013 8:16 PM GMT
    tanbod saidWhen would you consider yourself a beginner, and when would you consider yourself an intermediate level weight-lifter? Some people say that high reps are for beginners and then once you're no longer considered that and have good form you should switch to low reps and heavy weight.

    I've been working out for a couple of years now and decided about 3-4 weeks ago to try the Big Man On Campus routine on Bodybuilding .com, however it seems to be targeting high reps (10-12) vs low reps (6-icon_cool.gif.

    Based on your experience, do you believe I as a hard gainer who is seeing 'some' results from this routine, should switch to 6-8 reps and heavy weights, or continue the program's current curriculum?

    Any other routines you'd recommend instead?

    Thanks!


    how much do you bench, squat and deadlift? that would pretty much indicate where you stand...
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    Jul 10, 2013 8:27 PM GMT
    whoever gave you that advice was probably trying to keep you from going heavy before you learned adequate form. you're less likely to hurt yourself using lower weights at higher reps than you are using heavier weights at lower reps.

    the fact that you're asking the question probably means you've been lifting long enough to start thinking about your goals. if you're looking to put on mass, heavier weights and lower reps is the way to go. if you're looking for endurance and tone, higher reps and lower weights is what you'd want to do.

    all that being said, do take the time to make sure you're using proper form. that's the key to making good, steady, healthy progress.

    good luck.