I need some advice guys

  • capitalcities

    Posts: 31

    Jul 08, 2013 1:56 PM GMT
    Hey all-
    I've posted to this forum before from a different approach-

    Here is my dilemma that I need guidance and support with:
    I'm 28, 138lbs, 5'9". I have been working out consistently for 2 years. I started out doing a lot of cardio and not as much lifting. In the last year or so, I have decreased my cardio to 2x/week for a max of 20 mins/session. And I have been lifting 3x/week, increasing my weight consistently and changing up my routine every so often to keep it fresh.

    However, I am still thin. I am not unhappy with my body, but I feel like I should be stronger than I am, and I'm at a loss of what else to do. My diet is super clean, nothing processed. I eat plenty of protein and carbs and healthy fats, all from natural sources, with additional protein shakes pre and post workout. But I still have a tiny little lower belly gut that I'm desperate to get rid of. My bf % is 13%, so I know I need to lose more in order to reveal abs (or so I've read). But my big problem is, how can I lose my lower belly fat and build muscle? I know you can't do both at once, but I need a solution. If I diet to lose the little belly, I'll lose nutrition for muscle growth. HELP!

    And thank you in advance. I realize this is all just based on what you know and what has worked with you, so I'll have to tweak things for myself, but any HELPFUL advice and criticism would be appreciated. Keep the hate for more worthy topics. icon_smile.gif
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jul 08, 2013 2:13 PM GMT
    If you are skinny you probably have a high metabolism, some guys just can't gain weight no matter what they eat, so if you're that kind of guy, stop worrying about your diet and start scarfing down the burgers, fries and pastas.
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    Jul 08, 2013 3:35 PM GMT
    capitalcities said And I have been lifting 3x/week, increasing my weight consistently and changing up my routine every so often to keep it fresh.

    While it is good to change things up to keep things interesting, you also need to know if you are progressing.

    Keep these as your main lifts :
    Squats
    Deadlifts
    Chins
    Bench

    Make sure that with each you track progress to ensure that those lifts are going up. It takes bigger muscles to lift bigger weights. If you aren't lifting more, you aren't getting bigger. If the weights aren't going up on the bar then you aren't getting bigger.

    Also track you calories to make sure that you are eating enough. If you want to gain muscle and loose fat at the same time, then you need to do a 'body re-composition' for which you need to be very careful with calories throughout the week. A little too much and it becomes a bulk, a little too little and it becomes a cut. Also body recomp changes are excruciatingly slow so a huge amount of patience over a long period of time is required.
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    Jul 08, 2013 8:39 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidIf you are skinny you probably have a high metabolism, some guys just can't gain weight no matter what they eat, so if you're that kind of guy, stop worrying about your diet and start scarfing down the burgers, fries and pastas.

    This is what I did and it was a mistake. When I was 19 I weighed 140 and was 6'3"; skinny as a rail. I worked out with weights and got up to 170. Then I started running. Then I moved to a hilly place and stopped running. But I maintained my previous eating habits which was eating anything and everything and not worrying about fat and sugar. When I got to my 50s I weighed almost 240 and those additional 70 pounds were all fat. I dieted and got down to 190. I'm now at around 185.

    Short story: always eat sensibly.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jul 08, 2013 10:12 PM GMT
    Lumpynose said
    AMoonHawk saidIf you are skinny you probably have a high metabolism, some guys just can't gain weight no matter what they eat, so if you're that kind of guy, stop worrying about your diet and start scarfing down the burgers, fries and pastas.

    This is what I did and it was a mistake. When I was 19 I weighed 140 and was 6'3"; skinny as a rail. I worked out with weights and got up to 170. Then I started running. Then I moved to a hilly place and stopped running. But I maintained my previous eating habits which was eating anything and everything and not worrying about fat and sugar. When I got to my 50s I weighed almost 240 and those additional 70 pounds were all fat. I dieted and got down to 190. I'm now at around 185.

    Short story: always eat sensibly.

    Ya, this. I had a scale in my bathroom for the first thirty-five years to keep track of my weight so I'd know if I'd LOST any. From age 24-35 I could eat anything and everything and never gain weight. Then some genetic switch was flipped and I instantly gained 25 pounds. Then another five, then another five, etc until I crossed over 200 which was about 20 pounds too much for my musculature at the time. I can gain five pounds in a week-end of eating poorly and it takes weeks to get it off and even then the floor below which I'd like to go keeps rising, though I have added muscle.

    Eat a good, healthy sustainable diet. If you want to put on muscle, add non-fat protein shakes. Stay health and lean. The bulk will come (or not) in time.
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jul 08, 2013 10:16 PM GMT
    Lumpynose said
    AMoonHawk saidIf you are skinny you probably have a high metabolism, some guys just can't gain weight no matter what they eat, so if you're that kind of guy, stop worrying about your diet and start scarfing down the burgers, fries and pastas.

    This is what I did and it was a mistake. When I was 19 I weighed 140 and was 6'3"; skinny as a rail. I worked out with weights and got up to 170. Then I started running. Then I moved to a hilly place and stopped running. But I maintained my previous eating habits which was eating anything and everything and not worrying about fat and sugar. When I got to my 50s I weighed almost 240 and those additional 70 pounds were all fat. I dieted and got down to 190. I'm now at around 185.

    Short story: always eat sensibly.

    As you get older you have to change your eating habits because you are not longer growing. You need to change your eat and drinking habits starting about 30. But when you're young ... enjoy ... because you won't be when you get older. That doesn't mean you shouldn't monitor your eating habits at all, that mean you can be a little more relaxed about it.
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    Jul 08, 2013 11:37 PM GMT
    I was 140lbs for YEARS. You know how kids gain the "Frosh 15" in their first year of college? I LOST weight. So if anyone knows about a super fast metabolism, it's me.

    I am/was what you call a "hard gainer". Maybe you're one too. The trick pretty much is not only do you have to eat sensibly, but u have to eat A LOT more often. But you can't do anything until you have your goals mapped out.

    First, you need to ask yourself what ur primary goal is. My guess is you want to gain (good) mass. So, that means you must eat a lot more and more often throughout the day. As for the gym, scale back on the cardio and lift heavier. Change your routine and rest times after about 4-6wks (once your body has gotten used to it). You can't make any gains in the gym unless you add stress to ur muscles. This means, do something they're not used to. Whether that means more weight, different exercises, less rest time, super setting etc.

    Or if you dont mind having small testicles, do roids icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 08, 2013 11:41 PM GMT
    If you can't put on bulk, go for great abs.
  • capitalcities

    Posts: 31

    Jul 09, 2013 1:52 PM GMT
    JohnSpotter saidIf you can't put on bulk, go for great abs.


    haha ok well give me a sure-fired abs meal and workout plan and I'm on it! I feel like abs are even harder to build then muscle.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jul 09, 2013 9:29 PM GMT
    In all the years I've worked out, I never found the secret of getting "six pack" abs, though my stomach was pretty flat from doing sit ups and leg lifts.

    My experience has been that weight lifting is WAY more effective than aerobics, in getting a trim muscular body.

    My advice to you would be to eat more small meals, throughout the day. Never stuff yourself at any meal.
    Work out with heavy weights, 4 days per week.
    Do sit ups and leg lifts, 4 days per week (do them before the rest of your work out).
    Take a creatine supplement (look for the capsules).
    Skip all the other supplements.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jul 09, 2013 9:50 PM GMT
    I'm now 75 and have never been overweight.

    Regarding the belly fat (from your pictures it looks as though you do have a little bit, but not much), I suggest that you increase your aerobic exercise. Unless you have problems that would make running inadvisable, I suggest running three times per week, three miles each run. An eight minute per mile pace should be (or should become) easy; probably you can get it down to less than seven minutes per mile. That's only nine miles per week, which isn't a lot, but it should help. Running a mile takes only about 100 calories, but the metabolism rate remains elevated for some time after you stop so it actually burns more calories than one might suppose. You could gradually increase your mileage. It would be good to do intervals once per week but doing intervals more often can cause injuries and other problems.

    If running creates problems that you can't overcome, swimming and bicycle riding are also good aerobic exercises. Eliptical trainers and stationary exercise bicycles also work, but they can be too boring to endure.

    When I was in my early 50s, I was still able to run 10 miles in less than 70 minutes, which is faster than seven minutes per mile, yet I've never been competitive.

    Based on my experience from when I was younger, the running should not decrease your ability to increase muscle mass, especially if you do not run on the same days you do your resistance training. Also, the maximum amount of muscle mass we are able to get is limited by genetics. If you are quite lean, the muscles you do have will be much more defined.

    You seem to have a good diet. I would ignore the advice to eat junk or other unhealthful food since any advantages in doing so would be likely to be outweighed by the detrimental effects.