Robert Galbraith mystery writer gets rave reviews but sells no books. Now revealed as J.K. Rowling pseudonym.

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    Jul 15, 2013 5:03 PM GMT
    I'm not sure what to make of this story. Sure, it could all be just a publicity stunt from start to finish. But it seems to illustrate two things.

    First, I've avoided JKR's "adult" books on the assumption that her popularity is due more to hype than substance. But if the book gets rave reviews when the reviewer "doesn't know that it's her," perhaps there is really something there. (Barring the possibility that it's all just a stunt, and the reviewers were in on it.)

    Second, it reinforces the notion that the public couldn't care less about good books. With an unknown author, but rave reviews and the backing of a big publishing company, the book sold 1500 copies. Now, they probably won't be able to print enough copies. (Hmm... but if they happen to have warehouses full of them, all ready to go this week, it will look pretty suspicious.) If Little, Brown couldn't force-feed "Galbraith" then what chance is there for decent books to be discovered?


    Anybody care? Thoughts?
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    Jul 15, 2013 9:27 PM GMT
    There are several lists lists that a mystery, private eye, etc. book can get nominated for; Edgar, Shamus, Golden Dagger, etc. If an author has a book on any of those lists then I'll try something of theirs. Otherwise there are too many mystery books to be sampling. This could be a factor here; it's not on one of those lists yet.

    Commercial success doesn't equate to quality writing in my opinion. Although I loved the first Harry Potter book, the rest were all tiresome soap operas and I feel soiled from having read them.
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    Jul 16, 2013 1:48 AM GMT
    I found your analysis intriguing.

    However, if this turns to be a publicity stunt, it was a damn well coordinated effort and move by Rowling.

    Also, if it is genuine, I have deep respect and admiration that Rowling wanted her book to be reviewed in a more aesthetic way instead of based off her previous works.

    Overall, well done Rowling!
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    Jul 16, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidI'm not sure what to make of this story. Sure, it could all be just a publicity stunt from start to finish. But it seems to illustrate two things.

    First, I've avoided JKR's "adult" books on the assumption that her popularity is due more to hype than substance. But if the book gets rave reviews when the reviewer "doesn't know that it's her," perhaps there is really something there. (Barring the possibility that it's all just a stunt, and the reviewers were in on it.)

    Second, it reinforces the notion that the public couldn't care less about good books. With an unknown author, but rave reviews and the backing of a big publishing company, the book sold 1500 copies. Now, they probably won't be able to print enough copies. (Hmm... but if they happen to have warehouses full of them, all ready to go this week, it will look pretty suspicious.) If Little, Brown couldn't force-feed "Galbraith" then what chance is there for decent books to be discovered?


    Anybody care? Thoughts?


    I mean, do you really think book quality is always (or even generally) proportional to sales? One word... Twilight....

    I genuinely believe she wanted to keep it secret, and she probably did not even want the delayed "reveal" (certainly she doesn't need the cash - must've been the publisher's loose lips). Rowling has always been known for intense privacy and disinterest in being adored.
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    Jul 17, 2013 4:08 PM GMT
    Shot up to Amazon's #1 seller, from dead last* in two days.

    (*stratified with all the other non-sellers)