Study: Americans who quit smoking earn more than smokers or people who have never smoked

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 18, 2013 4:40 PM GMT
    http://on.wsj.com/13AV5n8

    Americans who quit smoking earn more than smokers or people who have never smoked, a study found.

    Current smokers, on the other hand, earn about 80% of nonsmokers’ wages. Even one cigarette a day triggers a wage gap, researchers said.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 18, 2013 8:23 PM GMT
    I don't think there's any question that smoking is bad/expensive/unhealthy/psychologically symptomatic/etc.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 18, 2013 8:30 PM GMT
    Matiz saidI don't think there's any question that smoking is bad/expensive/unhealthy/psychologically symptomatic/etc.


    The study suggests that those who are able to quit make more than even those who never smoked who in turn make more than those who smoke.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 18, 2013 10:37 PM GMT
    I quit a year and a half ago. I'm still waiting for my 20% raise..icon_neutral.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 18, 2013 10:42 PM GMT
    Well of course they make more they made enough to smoke in the past now they have extra money.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 12:53 AM GMT
    The same could be said of people who lost a lot of weight. My income literally tripled since I lost 70 lbs, and the weight loss was a direct influence on that (boss said it showed determination and perseverance).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 1:07 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidThe same could be said of people who lost a lot of weight. My income literally tripled since I lost 70 lbs, and the weight loss was a direct influence on that (boss said it showed determination and perseverance).


    It's all the savings in fuel hauling yer lardass.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 2:21 AM GMT
    Who even thought to do that study?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 3:56 AM GMT
    My first reaction: I bet this is correlated with age.

    Come on, guys, read the paper. The main point of the paper is that smokers earn less than nonsmokers, and the authors are looking at factors that contribute to this wage gap. The headline about quitters earning more than smokers and never-smokers is a nice attention-grabber, but it's a tangential finding; it's not news either, since the authors mention that this has been observed before.

    As for what's behind the claim that former smokers earn more than anybody else, look at the raw data. Even if you are skeptical about the use of linear regression models to 'explain' social behavior (and I count myself in that camp), you can still check out Table 2 on page 43, which reports simple averages by group. Former smokers are older than any other group, so it makes sense for them to earn more. Why would they be older? The group of former smokers includes those who quit because of health reasons, typically after years of accumulation of smoking's side effects.

    The authors' assertion that "former smokers have attributes that are more highly rewarded in the labor market than either current smokers or never smokers" is pretty bogus. Right, the attribute in question is called AGE. 'Ability to quit', as the headline claims, has nothing to do with the higher rewards.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Jul 19, 2013 4:05 AM GMT
    _zed_ saidMy first reaction: I bet this is correlated with age.

    Come on, guys, read the paper. The main point of the paper is that smokers earn less than nonsmokers, and the authors are looking at factors that contribute to this wage gap. The headline about quitters earning more than smokers and never-smokers is a nice attention-grabber, but it's a tangential finding; it's not news either, since the authors mention that this has been observed before.

    As for what's behind the claim that former smokers earn more than anybody else, look at the raw data. Even if you are skeptical about the use of linear regression models to 'explain' social behavior (and I count myself in that camp), you can still check out Table 2 on page 43, which reports simple averages by group. Former smokers are older than any other group, so it makes sense for them to earn more. Why would they be older? The group of former smokers includes those who quit because of health reasons, typically after years of accumulation of smoking's side effects.

    The authors' assertion that "former smokers have attributes that are more highly rewarded in the labor market than either current smokers or never smokers" is pretty bogus. Right, the attribute in question is called AGE. 'Ability to quit', as the headline claims, has nothing to do with the higher rewards.

    Thanks for distilling the study. I wasn't really all that interested (never smoked nor do I plan to, even if quitting later on would allegedly earn me more money) so I didn't bother reading to see how they came to their conclusions.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 4:05 AM GMT
    I tried smoking once...do I count?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 4:10 AM GMT
    turbobilly said
    paulflexes saidThe same could be said of people who lost a lot of weight. My income literally tripled since I lost 70 lbs, and the weight loss was a direct influence on that (boss said it showed determination and perseverance).


    It's all the savings in fuel hauling yer lardass.
    EX-lardass, thank you very much! icon_mad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 19, 2013 4:38 PM GMT
    _zed_ saidMy first reaction: I bet this is correlated with age.

    Come on, guys, read the paper. The main point of the paper is that smokers earn less than nonsmokers, and the authors are looking at factors that contribute to this wage gap. The headline about quitters earning more than smokers and never-smokers is a nice attention-grabber, but it's a tangential finding; it's not news either, since the authors mention that this has been observed before.

    As for what's behind the claim that former smokers earn more than anybody else, look at the raw data. Even if you are skeptical about the use of linear regression models to 'explain' social behavior (and I count myself in that camp), you can still check out Table 2 on page 43, which reports simple averages by group. Former smokers are older than any other group, so it makes sense for them to earn more. Why would they be older? The group of former smokers includes those who quit because of health reasons, typically after years of accumulation of smoking's side effects.

    The authors' assertion that "former smokers have attributes that are more highly rewarded in the labor market than either current smokers or never smokers" is pretty bogus. Right, the attribute in question is called AGE. 'Ability to quit', as the headline claims, has nothing to do with the higher rewards.


    Not sure you can say it's "pretty bogus".

    Looking at table 2 - the average age of former smokers is 46.914, non-smokers is 42.322, smokers is 41.094 and for the full population: 42.076. The average hourly wage is 15.627 for the full sample, 13.101 for smokers, 16.261 for non smokers and 16.892 for former smokers. That's still a fairly significant difference.

    They'd only be bogus if it were solely in age though I suspect they aren't - but then again there could be other factors as well.
  • heyom

    Posts: 389

    Jul 20, 2013 5:15 AM GMT
    turbobilly said
    paulflexes saidThe same could be said of people who lost a lot of weight. My income literally tripled since I lost 70 lbs, and the weight loss was a direct influence on that (boss said it showed determination and perseverance).


    It's all the savings in fuel hauling yer lardass.


    LOL!!!

    Anyways: quitting smoking now! (I wish)
  • mitshoo

    Posts: 76

    Jul 20, 2013 5:25 AM GMT
    Here's my theory - who smokes the most? Stressed people. Who is stressed more on average? Lower class people with sucky, low paying jobs. When I worked at Buffalo Wild Wings, I think I was one of two people who did not take a smoke break. I also was born into a higher social class than my waiter coworkers. When you are lower class, you have stresses upper class people don't, and jobs that are worse, and you find a way to deal in the little moments throughout the day. Many do that with nicotine. I'm not saying using a cigarette for stress management is good or healthy, but I feel like this is a pretty fair (though simplified) description of social classes with respect to smoking. So rather than say "smoking causes lower wages" (which the article implies) why not ask "under what conditions do people want to smoke?". My answer - when their lives are stressful.

    This excludes other motives, like teens wanting to look cool and such, but I think that falls outside of the particular question of the wage/smoking status link, and I wanted to keep this short.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Jul 20, 2013 5:54 AM GMT
    mitshoo saidHere's my theory - who smokes the most? Stressed people. Who is stressed more on average? Lower class people with sucky, low paying jobs. When I worked at Buffalo Wild Wings, I think I was one of two people who did not take a smoke break. I also was born into a higher social class than my waiter coworkers. When you are lower class, you have stresses upper class people don't, and jobs that are worse, and you find a way to deal in the little moments throughout the day. Many do that with nicotine. I'm not saying using a cigarette for stress management is good or healthy, but I feel like this is a pretty fair (though simplified) description of social classes with respect to smoking. So rather than say "smoking causes lower wages" (which the article implies) why not ask "under what conditions do people want to smoke?". My answer - when their lives are stressful.

    This excludes other motives, like teens wanting to look cool and such, but I think that falls outside of the particular question of the wage/smoking status link, and I wanted to keep this short.

    Very, very true.