"Hate the sin not the sinner".....

  • Paradigm_Shif...

    Posts: 251

    Sep 12, 2007 1:07 AM GMT
    What do you think about this popular Christian saying?

    Is this the first step towards reconciliation between two communities or just another way to express the first word, "Hate"?
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    Sep 12, 2007 1:21 AM GMT
    is hate a sin?
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    Sep 12, 2007 1:53 AM GMT
    The same line is used on drug addicts, adulters, thieves, and host of others whose actions are hated but the individual isn't - implying the possibility of redemption...

    At least that's what I've been seeing; yup, in light of what seems on the surface a noble perspective, when directed to us it is still hate to me.

    I don't need or want redemption for my sexual orientation. More progressive Christians would agree because they accept "gayness" as a part of God's purpose. To some, God made me gay and they know that it means more than male-to-man sex!

    It includes love.

    And love is something the fanatical Christian Right knows nothing about as evidenced by their actions, hypocracy, and politics.

    YMMV ;-)
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    Sep 12, 2007 3:27 AM GMT
    I find the fundamentalist mindset to be abominable in the very least. I would rather be gay than to be a hateful fundamentalist. It'll be fun to see the look on their faces when we all meet in Hell, eh??

    However, I bet I know which group will minister to the pain and suffering of the other group, hugging and comforting them and wiping the sweat from their brows. (grin)
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    Sep 12, 2007 3:49 AM GMT
    I think it is an outrageously arrogant conceit.

    R
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    Sep 12, 2007 4:40 AM GMT
    It's a euphemism for, "Eww, icky butt sex!"
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    Sep 12, 2007 6:12 AM GMT
    What is "sin" supposed to be anyway?
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    Sep 12, 2007 6:13 AM GMT
    "sin", "god", "christian"

    I don't believe in any of them. Superstitious nonsense used to control people's lives.
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    Sep 12, 2007 6:13 AM GMT
    ... and make money out of them.
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    Sep 12, 2007 6:44 AM GMT
    I think a few things about that statement:

    1)Few people, especially religious ones even know what is right and wrong, or sin.

    2)Certain Christians in particular can't obey their professed savior's very plain commands like love your neighbor, and even love your ENEMY. How can you call yourself a Christian when you don't even believe what he said? "But I tell you: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you" Now not only do these people hate you and call it love (and project it on GOD) but they are the ones doing the persecuting.

    3)if you spend your time obsessing about other's "sins" you are again ignoring YOUR savior's advice .. "You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye." notice the comparison with the plank in the accusers eye to the "speck" in the accused's eye.

    4)You can get into rules and interpretations of them all you want, but anyone with sense can read the words of "Jesus" in the Christian bible and see that he was, a pacifist (do not take up the sword, turn the other cheek), did not approve of the self righteous religious leaders of his day, and said that his kingdom was not of this world (i.e. governments and politics). In a nutshell the organizations that want to bothered with other people's sins and use politics and government to enforce their views are all disqualifying themselves as followers of "Jesus."

    5)read the reference in iscottosx's posting if you are caught up in rules of righteousness.

    6)You can hate many things .. broccoli, cottage cheese, pink underwear .. why should I give a crap if you hate me? frankly I would rather know if you hate me so I can watch my back when you are around.

    I could say more, but I think you can get the idea of what I think of the religious (self) right(eousness)



  • trebor965

    Posts: 200

    Sep 12, 2007 8:20 AM GMT
    ego and ignorance at its finest. the cheapest way to say i forgive you.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Sep 12, 2007 10:53 AM GMT
    It's christian code for..."I really hate you but I know I can't say it"

    If you notice the word hate is still in there
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    Sep 12, 2007 1:29 PM GMT
    a sin is something religious people like to be flexible with to promote their own goals and beliefs.

    Religion should be outlawed in my opinion the same as they did with the KKK
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    Sep 12, 2007 1:49 PM GMT
    Hate the creed, not the cretin.
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    Sep 12, 2007 2:10 PM GMT
    If the "sin" is expressing intimacy to a loved one, and they are trying to discourage the behavior, are they not hating the "sinner" as well by virtue of denying him or her true love?

    It's like loving the starving man but not allowing him to eat. Hateful.

    They can couch it any way they want. It's all just fear, ignorance, self-loathing (for the countless closet cases) and nothing more.
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    Sep 12, 2007 3:20 PM GMT
    It 's convenient for them but very hypocritical.
  • irishkcguy

    Posts: 780

    Sep 12, 2007 3:41 PM GMT
    I've heard people use that phrase before and my interpretation of it has always been to love people where they are at even though you may have problems with aspects of their lives.

    The problem I think Christians who use that statement have is they don't separate the person from the behavior, which is the point to begin with.

    A lot (certainly not all) of Christians today seem to be either ignorant of the teachings and example of Jesus or they have convenienly forgotten them.
  • irishkcguy

    Posts: 780

    Sep 12, 2007 3:43 PM GMT
    I've heard people use that phrase before and my interpretation of it has always been to love people where they are at even though you may have problems with aspects of their lives.

    The problem I think Christians who use that statement have is they don't separate the person from the behavior, which is the point to begin with.

    A lot (certainly not all) of Christians today seem to be either ignorant of the teachings and example of Jesus or they have convenienly forgotten them.
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    Sep 12, 2007 3:46 PM GMT
    I like it. Makes sense to me
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    Sep 12, 2007 3:47 PM GMT
    the problem is when they 'hate' the sin, they think they are then entitled to 'correct' it....including destroying the 'sinner.'
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    Sep 12, 2007 3:52 PM GMT
    I prefer "The only way to get rid of temptation... is to give in to it!"
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    Sep 12, 2007 4:04 PM GMT
    Embrace the sinner, engage in the sin.
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    Sep 12, 2007 4:10 PM GMT
    Oh, it's a way to consciously practice cognitive dissonance. You get to be someone's moral superior without forgoing good Christian "love." It's a prescription for smugness.

    Of course, it's totally bogus, since the condemnation of homosexuality is the condemnation of love itself.
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    Sep 12, 2007 4:28 PM GMT
    It gives license to patronizing and condescending behavior. It also encourages the person using such a saying to avoid confronting important issues intellectually.

    Example of the former: I know you love tomatoes...someday you'll realize the error of your ways, and in the meantime, I'll pray for you, and hope that you'll realize that I am right and you are wrong.

    Example of the latter: I'm on the side of righteousness, and you are not. Tomatoes are forbidden, and I can't abide the fact that you like them. I'll pray that you'll grow to accept that you've chosen tomatoes over the righteous rutabaga. Yes, I know they are both vegetables...but, clearly, tomatoes are bad, because they are forbidden.
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    Sep 12, 2007 5:01 PM GMT
    What is the sin. What is considered a sin in one community or culture is not always considered a sin by another community or culture. What was or was not a sin 100 years ago, may or may not be a sin today.

    Can there be an absolute definition of sin?

    What does it mean to "love the sinner?"