HE'S HOT!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 21, 2013 8:43 PM GMT
    Outside my door this afternoon. Adorable.

    Haawtsquirrel.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 21, 2013 9:31 PM GMT
    A rather odd formation at the base of a fallen tree. If you notice, there are many pillars of dirt, each capped off with a single rock. What do you suppose did that?

    rootcaps.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 21, 2013 9:35 PM GMT
    How Cappadocia-meets-Monolith Monsters.

    6omob4.jpg

    2djyn2h.jpg

    33wl4qo.jpg



  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Jul 21, 2013 10:07 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidA rather odd formation at the base of a fallen tree. If you notice, there are many pillars of dirt, each capped off with a single rock. What do you suppose did that?

    rootcaps.jpg


    When a rock or boulder sits upon a bed of sediment or dirt it compacts all the sediment underneath it. When erosional forces come to call, they preferentially eat away at the sediment that is not shielded and compacted, leaving behind these structures.

    Large scale versions of these are known as hoodoos, and are common in arid regions and areas with large amounts of exposed, poorly sorted glacial till. Mesas are in essence the largest hoodoos, but instead of being shielded by a cap rock they have a large weathering-resistant layer of sediment overlying layers of weaker sediments. I don't know if the dirt versions have a name.

    Hoodoos-SWA.jpg
  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Jul 22, 2013 1:49 AM GMT
    Why did you copyright that picture?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 22, 2013 3:01 AM GMT
    WhoDey saidWhy did you copyright that picture?


    Because I took it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 22, 2013 3:05 AM GMT
    oh so this thread is not about me

    *leaves thread
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 22, 2013 5:28 AM GMT
    Rhi_Bran said
    wrestlervic saidA rather odd formation at the base of a fallen tree. If you notice, there are many pillars of dirt, each capped off with a single rock. What do you suppose did that?

    rootcaps.jpg


    When a rock or boulder sits upon a bed of sediment or dirt it compacts all the sediment underneath it. When erosional forces come to call, they preferentially eat away at the sediment that is not shielded and compacted, leaving behind these structures.

    Large scale versions of these are known as hoodoos, and are common in arid regions and areas with large amounts of exposed, poorly sorted glacial till. Mesas are in essence the largest hoodoos, but instead of being shielded by a cap rock they have a large weathering-resistant layer of sediment overlying layers of weaker sediments. I don't know if the dirt versions have a name.

    Hoodoos-SWA.jpg


    What a cool phenomenon.