Should racial profiling be eliminated in the education system?

  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Jul 23, 2013 8:11 AM GMT

    Growing up as an individual with white skin and a black ethnicity as always been extremely tough. I remember back in grade six a fellow student asking me what ethnicity/race do I belong to. I was reluctant to answer such a question not because I was ashamed of my identity, but because I don't think it really matter; what my race is hasn't hindered my ability to think critically, to hold intelligent conversations, hence I don't feel the need to tell people.

    Now, when I got to high school, I have matured a bit; my understanding of who I am deepened, deeply rooted in the self understanding that curiosity is often the motive for people's insensitive attitude. However, when I started to see questions like: "what race are you? What ethnicity do you belong to?" on exams, I knew that the problem is far more pervasive than I thought; I knew that this is far deeper than it appears to be. While it is certainly arguable that this type of actions are justifiable, I am convinced that the only way that we can ensure that every student have equal access to the same educational standards, complete removal of these questions has to be explored.

    I thought it might be interesting to hear your thoughts and opinion on this issue.

  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Jul 23, 2013 8:46 AM GMT
    I must have blocked the person that made that post.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 24, 2013 7:18 AM GMT
    I was just thinking about this tonight, after watching a video CopperDevil posted in another thread. I think there would be a good reason to see these kinds of questions dissolved. I get why affirmative action is important, but in a general college application I don't see why it matters. It's also divisive..... especially on RJ profiles.icon_confused.gif
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Jul 29, 2013 6:10 AM GMT
    I don't understand what purpose they serve though. Why they are there in the first place is mind burgling.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3525

    Jul 29, 2013 6:15 AM GMT
    they really dont racially profile in canada, it is just not such a big deal here unless there is an actual language problem.
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Aug 01, 2013 4:09 AM GMT
    Apparition saidthey really dont racially profile in canada, it is just not such a big deal here unless there is an actual language problem.
    Racial profiling does exist...maybe not to the extent of the state, but It really does.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Aug 01, 2013 5:16 AM GMT
    Although this was written before the Fisher decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, here's one perspective on using race in college admissions: http://ideas.time.com/2012/10/12/why-we-still-need-affirmative-action/
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Aug 01, 2013 5:19 AM GMT
    O5vx said
    Growing up as an individual with white skin and a black ethnicity as always been extremely tough. I remember back in grade six a fellow student asking me what ethnicity/race do I belong to. I was reluctant to answer such a question not because I was ashamed of my identity, but because I don't think it really matter; what my race is hasn't hindered my ability to think critically, to hold intelligent conversations, hence I don't feel the need to tell people.

    Now, when I got to high school, I have matured a bit; my understanding of who I am deepened, deeply rooted in the self understanding that curiosity is often the motive for people's insensitive attitude. However, when I started to see questions like: "what race are you? What ethnicity do you belong to?" on exams, I knew that the problem is far more pervasive than I thought; I knew that this is far deeper than it appears to be. While it is certainly arguable that this type of actions are justifiable, I am convinced that the only way that we can ensure that every student have equal access to the same educational standards, complete removal of these questions has to be explored.

    I thought it might be interesting to hear your thoughts and opinion on this issue.


    It seems like you assume that were it not for these racial questions, there would naturally be equal access to education and not that these questions are being asked precisely because there exists racially-based inequal access (and thereby ensure equality). What makes you believe that's the case?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 9:02 PM GMT
    What you write about is not racial profiling, but statistical data gathering.* In the US, this is found everywhere from the DMV to job applications. It provides a verifiable means to insure that various entities DO NOT discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, or country of origin.

    I am of the opinion that absolutely no one gets into a ranked college w/o merit(s). I also think that in higher education it may be time to look beyond race as a part of admissions, and look at family income instead. This seems a fairer way to provide equal access, and takes away one argument against affirmative action.


    *racial profiling: the assumption of criminality among ethnic groups: the alleged policy of some police to attribute criminal intentions to members of some ethnic groups and to stop and question them in disproportionate numbers without probable cause.