Why Does My Protein Bar Say 14g of Protein Is 28% of Daily Value Based on 2k Calorie Diet?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2013 7:55 PM GMT
    People who make protein should know that 50 grams (100% DV) on a 2k calorie diet is not enough protein for a 160 lb man or a man who wants to weigh 160 lbs.

    The guy at the vitamin shop who looks like he weighs 170 lbs or less eats 180 grams of protein a day.

    I said, you could eat a whole chicken a day? Then I thought about the little fellow eating two chicken breasts in one sitting.

    That's not fair. Perhaps he could eat a breast for lunch, a breast for dinner, and the other pieces for breakfast and in between meals.

    Could you/Are you eating a chicken a day?

    What do you think would happen if I went from having 20 grams of protein per day to one day trying to eat a whole chicken and drink a Whey Isolate drink with 40 grams of protein?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 03, 2013 10:59 PM GMT
    I'm going to get attacked when I say this, but I don't think we need as much protein as they say we do. So many of these "studies" are funded by....you guessed it....supplement manufactures. I also have to wonder if the protein found in fruit and vegetables processes more efficiently than meat. I'm not saying that it does, but it's just a gut feeling I've always had.
  • Beeftastic

    Posts: 1747

    Aug 04, 2013 12:03 AM GMT
    I actually think men need more than 50 grams of protein to have optimal health. Also I have read some studies that our bodies process protein less efficiently as we get older and many issues we develop as we get older is a lower of absorption of protein.

    I also think body type has a lot to do with what your optimal protein should be. I have some lean friends that were having issues gaining muscle mass even when they did regular exercise. When they added about 50 grams of protein to their daily diets they started gaining more muscle, and they had not changed their exercise much.

    http://www.patriotledger.com/topstories/x928646735/HEALTHY-EATING-Seniors-need-more-protein
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 04, 2013 8:30 PM GMT
    By analyzing multiple nitrogen-balance studies, the Institute of Medicine decides that 0.66g protein per kilo body weight per day is the median (middle value) requirement to maintain protein balance in adults. In order to ensure 97.5% of the adult population ingest adequate amount of protein, the current recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein for adult is set at 0.8g per kilo body weight per day (which is the median value plus between individual variance). The 2000 Kcal diet presumes the average weight of American adult is 70kg (154lbs). Therefore the recommended daily protein intake is 70kg X 0.8g/kg = 56g.

    For those of you who want to gain muscle as an amateur sportsman, a value of 1.0g/kg/day can be used, so that the body maintains a positive nitrogen balance.

    If you are a professional sportsman who trains several hours a day, use a value of 1.2 to 1.4g/kg/day.

    If you are another Michael Phelps (or you think you are), use a value of 1.6 to 1.7g/kg/day.

    Caveat: Overweight or obese individuals have to calculate the ideal body weight first, and use the ideal body weight to calculate the daily protein intake. Usually a value of 0.8g/kg/day is enough, but I see many nutritionists go for the higher value of 1g/kg/day. The reason is that these individuals are usually on a calorie-restricted diet. A higher value can make sure they ingest enough protein.
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    Aug 04, 2013 8:32 PM GMT
    StephenOABC saidPeople who make protein should know that 50 grams (100% DV) on a 2k calorie diet is not enough protein for a 160 lb man or a man who wants to weigh 160 lbs.

    The guy at the vitamin shop who looks like he weighs 170 lbs or less eats 180 grams of protein a day.

    I said, you could eat a whole chicken a day? Then I thought about the little fellow eating two chicken breasts in one sitting.

    That's not fair. Perhaps he could eat a breast for lunch, a breast for dinner, and the other pieces for breakfast and in between meals.

    Could you/Are you eating a chicken a day?

    What do you think would happen if I went from having 20 grams of protein per day to one day trying to eat a whole chicken and drink a Whey Isolate drink with 40 grams of protein?


    The RDA's issued by the government are bullshit. Just know that.
  • vbbri

    Posts: 34

    Aug 04, 2013 8:42 PM GMT
    Most protein numbers are inflated and not corrected for actual protein in the product. If a product does not make a claim outside of the Nutritional or Supplement Facts Panel, then the numbers high. If the protein were from peanuts let's say, then you would need to halve the number on the panel for actual peanut protein. Other protein sources have different correction factors. The generic protein test just tests all nitrogen in the product, nitrogen can come from many other sources than protein. Your body can really only use up to 15g of protein over a two hour period, anything above that is just flushed from the body as waist. Protein before a workout and then after is a great way to keep the fuel.
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    Aug 04, 2013 9:01 PM GMT
    vbbri said...anything above that is just flushed from the body as waist...


    Probably the funnest misspelling I'll read today. So much more awesome to see a toilet full of waist than that other stuff.