Skinny guys who have put on weight in the right places

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 12, 2008 12:53 AM GMT
    I am a skinny guy, so after years of excuses I finally decided to do whatever it takes to pile on the weight. For the last 6 weeks I've hit the gym regularly, never missing a workout even when I'm tired after 12 hours at work etc. I've also almost been force feeding myself.

    I've been drinking weight gainer and protein shakes with HMB, glutamine, creatine, etc etc.

    I've started to see some results I've never been able to achieve before, and I've put on 6 kg in the last 6 weeks. For me, that's a relatively large % of my starting weight.

    Question for you guys who have done this before, how do you make sure you put on weight in the right places? I've noticed my upper body is slowly responding, but my legs are glutes are responding way faster.

    Bad thing is I've gone up about two inches on my waist, I'm not sure how much of that is just digesting food that's waiting to be... eliminated. I'm too afraid to skip meals for fear of losing my gains. I also don't want to do too much cardio, otherwise that will limit my growth.

    Any thoughts or suggestions or tips would be greatly appreciated icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 12, 2008 1:16 AM GMT
    Oh one more thing, is there a danger in eating too much ham? I'm having two ham and cheese sandwiches a day (breakfast and afternoon snack).
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Nov 12, 2008 1:33 AM GMT
    You can't "make sure" to put on weight in the right places. Your genetics determine what areas will grow slowly and quickly. You just need to allow your body to put the weight on by eating like it's your job and working out hard.

    I really wouldn't do any cardio if I were you. MAYBE one day a week of HIIT (high intensity interval training).

    If I were you, I would eat my ass off. Keep it as clean as possible, but definitely eat until you can eat no more...at every meal. Pastas, brown rice, sweet potatoes, oatmeal, lean meats, wheat bread...etc etc

    You will put on some fat, too. It is what it is. The key is minimizing the fat gain and making sure the majority of your calories will go towards the rebuilding of muscle.

    Out of curiousity, how many calories are you consuming per day? And what's a typical menu for your day?

    Good luck and be patient. Keep in mind that it will take YEARS to accomplish what you want. Years.
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    Nov 12, 2008 6:56 AM GMT
    as a fellow ectomorph, i will tell you it might be easier if you accept your lean ness and not force feed yourself for vanity. i know that easier said than done and not the advice you seek, but i thought id share. i wouldnt skip cardio- its important for your heart and keeps the fat off. i dont know about the 2 ham and cheese sandiches, but you should eat 2 fruits a day.

    when youre 40, youre currently beefier friends will probably have problems with their waist, but i doubt you will. does that make you feel better? (probably not, but i thought id try)
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    Nov 12, 2008 7:02 AM GMT
    6 kilos in 6 weeks in awesome... i talked to a couple trainers and they said a pound a week for me was pushing the possibilities, so congrats... but make sure you're still eating all your food groups and if you're not taking a general vitamin supplement (those protein shakes don't cover everything) consider it... and eat like it's your job, even when you get sick of it...
  • Djmaxvayo

    Posts: 18

    Nov 13, 2008 5:52 AM GMT
    To Those Who Find it Difficult to Gain Weight
    icon_biggrin.gif

    Take heart! There are far more serious burdens to have in life. Not only will you grow to appreciate your body's fast metabolism as others around you age and widen, but you will also have the advantage of being able to do less cardio to stay lean as you age (compared with others whose metabolism slows at age 30 or so). I've had a quick metabolic rate all my life, and it doesn't appear to be slowing now. Of course, I do stay very active.

    However, I also attribute a lot of my leanness to eating right (not "dieting" as that implies temporary nutritional modification--I'm talking about walking the nutritional talk). I don't do supplements, tablets, shakes, protein powders, or any of that trademarked nonsense. Those fads are designed for one thing: to make the people selling the products wealthy, period.

    Proper nutrition comes from foods that are real and unprocessed; the best are organics. Don't put your health in the hands of people who want to sell you products with little nutritional value. Educate yourself about how to design a nutritionally rich, real food-based meal plan. Develop your palate; try new things and be adventurous with eating. Don't overwhelm yourself at the beginning--take it slowly. It took me almost 15 years to get to my current level of understanding of food, nutrition, and the health that can come from wise planning, self-discipline, and commitment.

    If you're skeptical, I say the proof is self-evident: I don't look like I do by accident--it's by design. To a large degree, though, our body "type" is pre-programmed: we can get more toned, lose weight, gain some muscle mass, etc. But, acceptance of your limits is critical too. I'll never be "beefy" in the way that some guys are and I accept that. It doesn't matter... there are guys out there who like your "type," no matter what that is.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 13, 2008 11:09 PM GMT
    Play the sports you like, eat well, read some good books and don't worry about other people.
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    Nov 14, 2008 12:33 AM GMT
    TexanMan82 saidYou will put on some fat, too. It is what it is. The key is minimizing the fat gain and making sure the majority of your calories will go towards the rebuilding of muscle.

    Out of curiousity, how many calories are you consuming per day? And what's a typical menu for your day?


    Thanks for the advice TexanMan, I am trying to avoid putting on 'bad weight' so I'll probably keep a close eye on my bodyfat % in the coming months.

    I'm trying not to count calories as that would just drive me insane.

    My typical menu for the day:

    breakfast: ham and cheese on granary bread
    mid morning: Maximuscle Cyclone bar, Fruit & Nut bar, or muesli bar, with fruit juice
    lunch: chicken or beef with rice, sometimes I cheat and have sushi
    mid afternoon: chicken/tuna and egg salad, tuna sandwich, chicken sandwich, or whatever I can lay my hands on at that time of the day!
    pre workout: Maximuscle Progain Extreme weight gainer / protein drink, plus Maximuscle Maxipower (GAKIC etc)
    post workout: Maximuscle Progain Extreme weight gainer / protein drink
    on my way home: ham and cheese on granary bread
    dinner: beef or chicken stir fry, some veggies (not enough), white rice

    Sometimes I have another snack before I sleep as well.

    I've given myself 3 years to get to where I want to be.
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    Nov 14, 2008 12:39 AM GMT
    sundayswim saidas a fellow ectomorph, i will tell you it might be easier if you accept your lean ness and not force feed yourself for vanity. i know that easier said than done and not the advice you seek, but i thought id share. i wouldnt skip cardio- its important for your heart and keeps the fat off. i dont know about the 2 ham and cheese sandiches, but you should eat 2 fruits a day.

    when youre 40, youre currently beefier friends will probably have problems with their waist, but i doubt you will. does that make you feel better? (probably not, but i thought id try)


    I have been horrendously thin in the past, although I eat lots at mealtimes, I've never stuck to the 6 meals a day thing until now.

    I have to admit a big part of the motivation is to look more fit and attractive, but at the same time I want to at least look more normal. Besides that I want to fit into shirts etc without having to hunt for the smallest sizes.

    I only do a 5 minute bike warm up before my weights sessions, I do plenty of walking which helps somewhat. I don't normally run, but I was able to do a 5.6km run a few months back with no problems.

    I'll definitely try to fit more fruits and veggies into my diet.


    My waist is expanding slightly! So I'm looking for ways to keep that down while building the rest of my body.
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    Nov 14, 2008 12:42 AM GMT
    timidpup said6 kilos in 6 weeks in awesome... i talked to a couple trainers and they said a pound a week for me was pushing the possibilities, so congrats... but make sure you're still eating all your food groups and if you're not taking a general vitamin supplement (those protein shakes don't cover everything) consider it... and eat like it's your job, even when you get sick of it...


    It's kind of slowed down a bit now, I've been a little more lax in eating 'like it's my job' icon_smile.gif I have another 5 weeks on this 12 week programme, I'm happy with the results so far and have raised my goals a bit. I'll probably focus on keeping my weight and keeping my energy up, eating better and getting more rest for the next few weeks.

    After that I'll take a short break and do another 12 week mass gaining programme.

    I've been rather lax in keeping track of food groups and proportions, so I'll probably start doing that as well.

    Thank you icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 14, 2008 12:46 AM GMT
    Djmaxvayo said
    If you're skeptical, I say the proof is self-evident: I don't look like I do by accident--it's by design. To a large degree, though, our body "type" is pre-programmed: we can get more toned, lose weight, gain some muscle mass, etc. But, acceptance of your limits is critical too. I'll never be "beefy" in the way that some guys are and I accept that. It doesn't matter... there are guys out there who like your "type," no matter what that is.


    Very sane advice, and much appreciated. I know I'll never be 'beefy', I think I would be amazed and overwhelmed if I got to your level of size, I'd be quite happy maintaining at that size!

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    Nov 14, 2008 1:22 AM GMT
    Remember that your legs contain the biggest muscles in your body, so a 10% increase in size of the quadriceps muscles will mean much more mass than a 10% increase in the size of your biceps muscles. It's all relative. Also remember that your body is based on genetics, which also control how your body responds to training. It may just be that genetically, you are inclined to have bigger legs. Or it could simply be that you are training the legs disproportionately.

    The weight around the waist is only worrisome if it is fat. But with your body type, I would have a hard time believing that all the extra calories you are consuming is going to fat around the waist. Just be vigilant and do a body fat test every 2 weeks or month or so. Don't take this too fast though, I doubt you want to end up with stretch marks on your skin...
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 20, 2008 6:59 AM GMT
    Djmaxvayo saidTo Those Who Find it Difficult to Gain Weight
    icon_biggrin.gif

    Take heart! There are far more serious burdens to have in life. Not only will you grow to appreciate your body's fast metabolism as others around you age and widen, but you will also have the advantage of being able to do less cardio to stay lean as you age (compared with others whose metabolism slows at age 30 or so). I've had a quick metabolic rate all my life, and it doesn't appear to be slowing now. Of course, I do stay very active.

    However, I also attribute a lot of my leanness to eating right (not "dieting" as that implies temporary nutritional modification--I'm talking about walking the nutritional talk). I don't do supplements, tablets, shakes, protein powders, or any of that trademarked nonsense. Those fads are designed for one thing: to make the people selling the products wealthy, period.

    Proper nutrition comes from foods that are real and unprocessed; the best are organics. Don't put your health in the hands of people who want to sell you products with little nutritional value. Educate yourself about how to design a nutritionally rich, real food-based meal plan. Develop your palate; try new things and be adventurous with eating. Don't overwhelm yourself at the beginning--take it slowly. It took me almost 15 years to get to my current level of understanding of food, nutrition, and the health that can come from wise planning, self-discipline, and commitment.

    If you're skeptical, I say the proof is self-evident: I don't look like I do by accident--it's by design. To a large degree, though, our body "type" is pre-programmed: we can get more toned, lose weight, gain some muscle mass, etc. But, acceptance of your limits is critical too. I'll never be "beefy" in the way that some guys are and I accept that. It doesn't matter... there are guys out there who like your "type," no matter what that is.


    Don't eat processed meat, especially ham. As for weight gainer and protein shakes, unless you are a bodybuilder you're just clogging your arteries.


    Great advice-fin
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    Nov 24, 2008 8:44 PM GMT
    Here are 3 Tips you should always take into account:

    1) Eat everything, always. You'll hear a lot of people telling you to eat clean, but they don't understand our body types. In your earlier training periods diet won't matter so much, but once you're out of that newbie gain phase, the only way you'll continue to put on weight is by eating like a vacuum. A good plan is to eat/drink 2x your body weight in protein, and adjust your carb/fat intake based on weight gained, and type of weight gained.

    2) Lift heavy, using the major compound lifts (i.e. bench press for chest, deadlift for back, squats for legs). A good start is a book called Starting Strength (http://aasgaardco.com/).

    3) Track your progress w/ a training log. Write down all your lifts, and try to beat your previous weight or rep-count each workout.

    I was like you 5 years ago, and in that time I learned that these are the most important things you can do to accomplish your goals. I've gained 60lbs, and am 20lbs away from my goal ultimate goal.

    It's possible! Don't give up!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 24, 2008 8:47 PM GMT
    I thought this thread would be about those rare skinny guys with big asses. This thread Fails. icon_mad.gif
  • ArmwrestlerJi...

    Posts: 188

    Nov 24, 2008 8:54 PM GMT
    Tommo...I have about 15 pounds you can borrow for a while icon_lol.gif
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    Nov 24, 2008 8:55 PM GMT
    I'm 5 foot 9 inches, and weigh between 135-145, is that a healthy weight?
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Nov 25, 2008 12:03 AM GMT
    Mikemikemike,

    Do you have anything to back up your claim of weight gainers and protein shakes clogging arteries?
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    Nov 25, 2008 1:21 AM GMT
    CitizenSol saidI thought this thread would be about those rare skinny guys with big asses. This thread Fails. icon_mad.gif


    Haha actually my a$$ is getting pretty huge, I can't fit into my pants/trousers anymore. Need to buy some new clothes.

    ArmwrestlerJim saidTommo...I have about 15 pounds you can borrow for a while icon_lol.gif


    As long as it's muscle and it can go onto my arms and chest!

    rezdylan saidI was like you 5 years ago, and in that time I learned that these are the most important things you can do to accomplish your goals. I've gained 60lbs, and am 20lbs away from my goal ultimate goal.

    It's possible! Don't give up!


    That's awesome. For many years I tried and tried but couldn't put on weight. I think this time I'm actually trying hard enough. It was less planned this time, I just stopping analysing and started doing. So this first 12 week period I'm using as my first bulk up / habit building period. I'll have 2 weeks rest after that, and then I'll do a proper 12 week period with planned food intake and a redesigned workout programme. Right now I'm doing simple 3x10s, upper/lower body split, and eating anything I could lay my hands on. Next time around I definitely need more veggies and fruits and other good stuff.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 25, 2008 8:13 AM GMT
    TexanMan82 saidMikemikemike,

    Do you have anything to back up your claim of weight gainers and protein shakes clogging arteries?


    Ask a Cardiologist- not a guy who does roids. Eat real/healthy fats healthy carbs and healthy proteins. Men who work out regularly have had heart attacks from eating and overloading on weight gainers. (including young men). There are increased risks he should be aware of before putting too much faith in weight gainers.

    Tommo you should get a baseline blood work up including fasting and cholesterol/ triglycerides work up.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Nov 25, 2008 8:05 PM GMT
    MikemikeMike said
    TexanMan82 saidMikemikemike,

    Do you have anything to back up your claim of weight gainers and protein shakes clogging arteries?


    Ask a Cardiologist- not a guy who does roids. Eat real/healthy fats healthy carbs and healthy proteins. Men who work out regularly have had heart attacks from eating and overloading on weight gainers. (including young men). There are increased risks he should be aware of before putting too much faith in weight gainers.

    Tommo you should get a baseline blood work up including fasting and cholesterol/ triglycerides work up.


    OK, but you're still not backing up the claim. Do you have any literature that we can read that point to weight gainers as causes of heart attacks?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 26, 2008 7:06 PM GMT
    All weight gainers have different nutritional compositions. As long as it's low fat/low cholesterol, there's absolutely no way that weight gainer will clog your arteries.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 24, 2008 5:18 PM GMT
    eat. Work out. rest. Eat, work out, rest.

    I went from the skinny triathlete who had gone a bit to seed (72kg) to starting to look more like a lifter (78kg).

    The first month I stayed the same weight and just got more toned. Then I started eating until I couldn´t eat any more. I went up until I got to 76, and then got fed up, and just went back to eating quite a lot. My weight was starting to setting at 78kg. 2 inches off my stomach (due to pilates... a lot of guys who are muscular have 3 month pregnant bellies which are largely the result of weak transverse abs). Then got ill, lost weight and am now regaining. I´m aiming for lean muscle, maybe about 80kg final goal for the short term. Over the next 5 years it will hopefully go up a little as my upper body gets bigger,

    eat, lift weights until tired, rest, repeat. The secret is consistancy.

    Good gaining.


    Oh.. and the pic I have on my profil was taken at a "fat stage". I found you gain a little extra in the manic eating stage, but as long as you keep working out it calms down. I´m in another "fat" stage (inverted commas as I am NOT fat, it´s just that you can´t see the ab definition for the moment).
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    Dec 27, 2008 4:52 AM GMT
    Ah I love talking about this subject. I went from skinny (135 lbs out of high school) to "fat" 200 lbs by the time I was 30, and then down to 140 when I was 38. Sickly. Now I'm at what I call "average" but that's relative I suppose. I have a collage in my profile.

    I eat about 4000 calories a day to maintain 160 lbs. On a "minimal workout" 4 x 50 per week. I have not yet learned how to maximize my workout. I already do a lot of walking, hiking and biking, not intense or for sport so much as I love it recreationally. That's mostly why I don't gain weight. And if I don't eat this amount, I lose weight. I can easily lose a belt notch in a few days (that would be a waist size smaller). Scary, huh? LOL :-)

    I use ON Supermass twice daily (5 times a week) to me it tastes best and packs a lot of punch. I mix it with skim milk. I split the recommended serving size in half... so one half in the morning, and one half after I workout.

    That said... again... a pro should be consulted. This thread makes that point for me!
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    Dec 27, 2008 5:08 AM GMT
    rezdylan saidHere are 3 Tips you should always take into account:.

    2) Lift heavy, using the major compound lifts (i.e. bench press for chest, deadlift for back, squats for legs). A good start is a book called Starting Strength (http://aasgaardco.com/)..

    It's possible! Don't give up!


    Rezdylan has some good advice - but there is one major component missing on the 'lift heavy' mantra. That being lift heavy...

    FOR YOU!!!

    Just because you see someone doing bicep curls with 50-60 lbs dumbbells, does not mean that you will be doing that either. Trust me, noone will laugh or care if you are doing 20-25 lbs especially if that is your max. People respect the fact that you are even there trying to make good changes to your body (and in some case soul)

    Just don't be that guy looking silly and getting injured everytime he looks at a weight.

    Good Luck and make sure to check out some of the protein shake threads on here - along with weight gainer, massive amounts of protein will help you as well.