Mozart and RJ

  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Aug 01, 2013 6:08 AM GMT
    Turned on the tube, and the local PBS station was carrying the Met's production of La clemenza di Tito. I had never heard the complete opera before. So I put on the headphones and started looking at RJ. Not his best work, but at the summit of his career, has some of his best arias, and some fine clarinet passages. Needless to say , I am transported. A pity he died so young, as many of my friends did in the 80's.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 01, 2013 3:47 PM GMT
    Mozart is always easy for me to enjoy, although I lean a little more toward Brahms and Dvorak in my tastes. I have not taken the time to get to know opera very well. "La Clemenza..." has an interesting history though. Thanks Suetonius!


    3148columbus saidLove Mozart.

    How about some Diana Damrau this Thursday morning?


    Would love to hear her in person!



    OMG! icon_eek.gif *dies*
    That was delicious with my Thursday morning coffee! Great way to start a day off! Thank You! icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 01, 2013 4:23 PM GMT
    Wagner FTW



    Not moved by a great deal of classical music before the Romantic era.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 01, 2013 6:56 PM GMT
    The Marriage of Figaro was the first opera I ever loved, and I used to collect recordings of Mozart's Requiem (this is my favorite: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/mozart-requiem/id206931011 -- Ian Bostridge is the tenor soloist).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 01, 2013 7:23 PM GMT
    gayinterest saidWagner FTW



    Not moved by a great deal of classical music before the Romantic era.


    I also think Tristan is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever composed. I discovered it by accident because I really loved Bernard Hermann's score from Hitchcock's Vertigo and everyone kept saying it was a Tristan ripoff.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 01, 2013 8:51 PM GMT
    Love Mozart. The Magic Flute is my favorite of his operas.
    The Liebestod from Tistan and Isolde is the most erotic music I have ever heard.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Aug 01, 2013 11:29 PM GMT
    Aristoshark saidAlso Cosi fan tutte, another Mozart masterpiece.

    Così fan tutte is one of my favorite operas. Even with its silly plot, it has some of Mozart's best vocal music. I think Mozart was the greatest vocal composer ever, when it comes to trios and quartets. He had the ability to blend the voices together as if they were muscial intruments. The Così fan tutte trio aria, Soave sia il vento, is my favorite piece of operatic music. It is all too short.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Aug 01, 2013 11:33 PM GMT
    SF79 saidThe Marriage of Figaro was the first opera I ever loved, and I used to collect recordings of Mozart's Requiem (this is my favorite: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/mozart-requiem/id206931011 -- Ian Bostridge is the tenor soloist).

    I believe his requiem and the clarinet concerto were the last pieces he wrote before he died. Both masterpieces. I sang the requiem in a college choir, and I will never get the melodies out of my head.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 01, 2013 11:34 PM GMT
    Ah, Mozart. My favorite composer, whose imaginative music I can listen to all day.
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Aug 02, 2013 1:20 AM GMT
    gayinterest saidWagner FTW



    Not moved by a great deal of classical music before the Romantic era.

    Beethoven(whom I would call romantic - at least his later work) was a genius, but Mozart, an equal genius, was writing just before Beethoven, and there is a lot romantic in some of his later music. You might try listening to Mozart's Don Giovanni, composed toward the end of his life. It has a lot of romantic elements in it.
    Barenboim's notes on it:
    http://www.danielbarenboim.com/journal/don-giovanni.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    I've always been more of a baroque fan, but I have developed an appreciation for Mozart over the last few years. I particularly like his 40th symphony and his flute concertos.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 1:48 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidMy favorite Mozart opera is Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail, a comic opera with a delightful score.

    My favorite Wagner is Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg. Most of the Ring operas are too silly to be interesting.

    Aristo, you are so out of touch with the dictates of German Regietheater, which insists that the Ring can only be interpreted as an anti-capitalist parable of class struggle. Hence it's totally up your alley.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/02/arts/music/at-bayreuth-boos-and-dropped-jaws.html?ref=arts&_r=1&pagewanted=all&
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 1:56 AM GMT
    gayinterest saidWagner FTW



    Not moved by a great deal of classical music before the Romantic era.


    Similarly, I don't really enjoy much written in the Classical period, but Baroque is great. Romantic, Contemporary, absolutely. Honestly, having studied music history, theory, and composition, my view is that the Classical period was the least innovative and imaginative time for music.

    I remember for our assignments where we needed to write in certain forms, most students could write something that sounded passably like Mozart. The assignments for every other period were much more challenging, because sifting through endless possibilities requires a great deal of ingenuity. When I listen to a good piece by say, Prokofiev or Ravel, I find myself admiring an especially creative musical phrase thinking "how the hell did he come up with that?"

    SF79 said

    I also think Tristan is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever composed. I discovered it by accident because I really loved Bernard Hermann's score from Hitchcock's Vertigo and everyone kept saying it was a Tristan ripoff.


    Tristan is fantastic. You might really enjoy the song Im Treibhaus, a song also written by Wagner, which is one of the most interesting pieces of that musical form.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 2:02 AM GMT
    Suetonius said
    Aristoshark saidAlso Cosi fan tutte, another Mozart masterpiece.

    Così fan tutte is one of my favorite operas. Even with its silly plot, it has some of Mozart's best vocal music. I think Mozart was the greatest vocal composer ever, when it comes to trios and quartets. He had the ability to blend the voices together as if they were muscial intruments. The Così fan tutte trio aria, Soave sia il vento, is my favorite piece of operatic music. It is all too short.


    Seutonius, thank you. A director floated the idea of me singing the tenor role in this opera...

    Back to the trio (which doesn't include the tenor):

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 4:12 AM GMT
    Great thread -- so here's where all the other classical music junkies hang out...

    Well, for Mozart:

    I love "Don Giovanni" among his operas.

    I love the Sinfonia Concertante for violin and viola and orchestra (yup - I play viola...)

    The "Exultate Jubilate" for soprano and orchestra is great...

    But my favorite composer, hands down, is Bach.

    And my favorite piece of western classical music is the Monteverdi Vespers of 1610.

    I could go on for days on this thread but I'll stop now...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 4:18 AM GMT
    Aristoshark saidAlso Cosi fan tutte, another Mozart masterpiece.


    I had to perform Non Siate Ritrosi for one of my vocal juries in college. For anyone who's had to go through the process of being trained for an opera performance you know that you will never....ever......EEEEVER...in your LIFE....forget that piece. I've been continuously singing it for what...the past 6 years now?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 4:20 AM GMT
    Actually that's total bullshit I just realized I forgot like half the middle section where he's talking about his bel occhio and bel nasso.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Aug 02, 2013 4:57 AM GMT
    Actually, I hadn't previously heard of that opera although I've been at performances of other Mozart operas.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 5:06 AM GMT
    Mitridate, Re di Ponto, which was written when he was only 14, has one great aria after another. Here are a couple:



    No video needed when the singing is as good as this:



    The solo soprano parts of his C minor mass were written for his wife:

  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Aug 02, 2013 5:08 AM GMT
    Matiz said
    Aristoshark saidAlso Cosi fan tutte, another Mozart masterpiece.


    I had to perform Non Siate Ritrosi for one of my vocal juries in college. For anyone who's had to go through the process of being trained for an opera performance you know that you will never....ever......EEEEVER...in your LIFE....forget that piece. I've been continuously singing it for what...the past 6 years now?


    I like the traditional three Bs, i.e., Buxtehude, Borodin, and Bernstein. Woops, that's not right; it's Britten, Berlioz, and Bellini. Woops again, it's J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, and J.C. Bach. Or is it J.S. Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms? There are so many composers beginning with "B" that I can't keep track of them. Then there is Offen Bach.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 5:23 AM GMT
    I love Knoxville:Summer of 1915. I've got recordings of it with Eleanor Steber and with Dawn Upshaw.

    And I love the first movement of the Barber Piano Concerto.

  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Aug 02, 2013 5:27 AM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    FRE0 saidI like the traditional three Bs, i.e., Buxtehude, Borodin, and Bernstein. Woops, that's not right; it's Britten, Berlioz, and Bellini. Woops again, it's J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, and J.C. Bach. Or is it J.S. Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms? There are so many composers beginning with "B" that I can't keep track of them. Then there is Offen Bach.

    You missed one of my favorite B's, Samuel Barber




    I'm sorry about that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 02, 2013 6:00 AM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    TexDef07 saidAristo, you are so out of touch with the dictates of German Regietheater, which insists that the Ring can only be interpreted as an anti-capitalist parable of class struggle. Hence it's totally up your alley.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/02/arts/music/at-bayreuth-boos-and-dropped-jaws.html?ref=arts&_r=1&pagewanted=all&

    There is no way to make these operas even sillier, although apparently Mr. Castorp did his best.
    Anna Russell has always had the final word on the subject.

    Aristoshark, You made my day by posting the Anna Russell clip. I saw her act many years ago. I had no idea there was a film of it. I have just listened to the whole clip. She was delightful. At the time, all I knew of Wagner was Parsifal, Lohengrin, and Die Meistersinger. I had not yet suffered myself to sit through a four hour production of Das Rheingold without an intermission. And you are right, it is a silly story, although Wagner did not invent it, the story, the Nibelungenlied, having come from a 13th century epic poem derived from norse and germanic legend. We had to read some of it in german class in high school.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Aug 04, 2013 10:28 PM GMT
    MikeOnMain saidMitridate, Re di Ponto, which was written when he was only 14, has one great aria after another. Here are a couple:



    No video needed when the singing is as good as this:



    The solo soprano parts of his C minor mass were written for his wife:



    I hadn't previously heard that opera. I especially liked the first excerpt. His singing seemed so effortless even though it was a deceptively difficult aria.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 05, 2013 4:24 AM GMT
    I learned to appreciate Mozart because of this guy:

    bugsbunny.jpg
    220px-Rabbit_of_Seville_Titles.jpg