There are people on RJ from all over the world. Tell us about the country or place you live in.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 04, 2013 3:26 PM GMT
    I grew up in the east coast(Delaware). Recently moved to Portland, Maine. It's close to the ocean, but not as beautiful as Hawaii of course. The New England area is known for their lobsters, fluctuating climates, historic homes/architecture, whale watching, etc.

    The city of Boston is within driving distance. It is a big city that is quite conjested and filled with many nightlife activities. Lots of gay bars for those who are interested.icon_wink.gif

    I find it interesting to learn more about where you're from. Try to keep it short and simple. icon_smile.gif
  • Fable

    Posts: 3866

    Aug 04, 2013 3:31 PM GMT
    London.

    I grew up mainly never leaving southwest london. My mum doesn't drive and my father was always busy so we didn't trip it to many places around the city. Now I'm older I know london like the back of my hand and can pretty much get anywhere without having to TfL journey planner it.


    I love my city and the gems it offers. Something for every one. Museums galleries nightlife pubs commas for poorly structured sentences parks etc. it's a very busy city.


    I also grew up in Athens so ill save tht for another post.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 04, 2013 4:37 PM GMT
    I was born here (Pinner, UK):
    A404_Pinner_Road_-_geograph.org.uk_-_149

    Then grew up here (The Hague, Holland):
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQAfuK9sI-vBx-LGeXsMU6

    and here: (Houston TX):
    slider3.jpg

    and here: (Rangoon, Burma):
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS9rmaIHym9M7ZMExJ7KZc

    and here: (Islamabad, Pakistan)
    faisal-mosque-islamabad.jpg

    Then back to the UK: (Marlow, UK)
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQdjUQm3OBfpyLxIadsXoN

    After a bit of moving around for Uni, exes, being broke, I've ended up in Bristol, UK and I love it!

    It's liberal, vibrant, not too big / not too small, diverse, green, beautiful, edgy, arty and musical, prosperous, influential, and most of all friendly!

    Bristol. A charming city from 134Moises on Vimeo.

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    Aug 04, 2013 4:53 PM GMT
    HellNo said
    I find it interesting to learn more about where you're from. Try to keep it short and simple. icon_smile.gif

    Mission Impossible. OK - South Florida, one of the major gay meccas in the US. What with our living in Wilton Manors, rated among the top 3 US cities by gay population percentage, being adjacent to Fort Lauderdale with another heavy concentration of gay residents & tourists, and our spending lots of time in Key West, still a popular destination for vacationing gays, we find ourselves enjoying a wonderfully gay-friendly existence.

    I know some guys don't like an intense gay experience, being all gay all day, but we do and so this suits us perfectly. We're able to find the "tamer" things in our gay community, more suitable for our age, and avoid some of the scene that many guys justifiably criticize. A place can be what you make of it. Some good things:

    - It's never winter. That's what trips to New England are for.
    - Warm ocean & beaches, and inland waterways everywhere.
    - A fairly laid-back, outgoing and friendly LGBT community.
    - Generally gay-accepting straight population, unlike northern Florida.
    - Always something to see & do, typical of vacation destinations.
    - Handy airports & cruise seaports.
    - Active arts & culture scene, if not as sophisticated as some.

    Some drawbacks:

    - Summer humidity.
    - Getting into a blazingly hot car after parking outdoors.
    - Heavy traffic & poor drivers.
    - Flat, boring terrain, few scenic views.
    - Urban congestion in some parts.
    - Hurricanes guaranteed to hit at some time.
    - Hostile anti-gay State government, not likely to have gay marriage & rights here for many years.
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    Aug 04, 2013 8:14 PM GMT
    Born and raised on Long Island, NY. Right in the middle of it. One hour from NYC, 2-3 hrs from Atlantic City and a convenient ferry ride to Connecticut. Nice in spring, summer, and fall, miserable in winter. Only a 2 hr flight from Florida for a quick warm up during the worst of winter. Good food, bad traffic, selfish people. High taxes, but if you're fairly smart you can earn a good living and live in a decent home. We can't wait to retire to Arizona, where it's so different I don't know where to begin. In Phoenix you can actually laugh at the broads on a chain gang as you drive past! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 04, 2013 10:23 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]Aristoshark

    Now in Boca Raton FL, living here:

    inc_getphoto.asp?w=18&m=R3342266[/quote]


    Do you play Mahjong with the other old ladies?? icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 04, 2013 10:31 PM GMT
    I grew up in Santa Barbara, CA. Nice beaches, mountains and the downtown is pretty nice, lots of Spanish architecture around.

    Right now, I live in Thousand Oaks, which is a nice suburb with a lot of open space and natural feature. Hiking, biking and any other outdoor activities are great to do out here.
  • Sebastian18

    Posts: 255

    Aug 04, 2013 10:34 PM GMT
    I was born in Tacoma, Washington.

    WA086-2.jpg

    Spent my last year of High School in Dresden, Germany.



    Went to university in Olympia, Washington.

    Olympia-Washington-Waterfront-1.jpg

    Now living the dream in Seattle, Washington.

    seattle.jpg

    Seattle is the largest city in the Pacific Northwest region and was founded in 1869. Due to its strategic location, it was and remains one of the largest port-cities along the West Coast of the United States. The overall climate is very moderate and politically it is one of the more progressive and LGBTQ friendly cities in the US.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Aug 05, 2013 5:14 AM GMT
    I live in the United States of America, more commonly known as "America."

    Most non "Americans" seem to like to bitch about "America," yet an awful lot of them are dying to get here to go to school, or to work here, or to live here permanently. Go figure...


    sqnnz5.jpg
  • e2ksj3355

    Posts: 110

    Aug 05, 2013 5:49 PM GMT
    I grew up in rural eastern NC. It was ok, but not a good place for LGBT youth. I moved to Charlotte for college and now in DC. DC is okay, but it is very difficult there to make friends since a lot of people are moving in and out. I'm hoping to one day move to Europe.
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    Aug 05, 2013 5:52 PM GMT
    Scottsdale AZ, who wants to come and play with me in my backyard ?
    gorgeous-sedona-arizona-sunset1_zpsf85e2
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 05, 2013 6:01 PM GMT
    Grew up in a small Pennsylvania rural town and now I live in the gay mecca:

    981325_10201579428152138_654483161_o.jpg
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    Aug 05, 2013 6:18 PM GMT
    Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada:
    vancouver_skyline_281.jpg

    Childhood in Langley, British Columbia, Canada:
    home-inspection-abbotsford_med_hr.jpeg

    Teenage years in Calgary, Alberta, Canada:
    CalgarySkyline.jpg

    New London, New Hampshire, USA for a year when I was 20:
    cfiles23117.jpg

    Currently living in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada:
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    I've gotten to live in some absolutely beautiful places. Kelowna is sort of like the closest thing in Canada to California, so much so that the nickname Kelownafornia has stuck around for a long time. Very active/athletic community here, but unfortunately the gay scene is quite small, and gay/bisexual men who are also athletically competitive are close to non-existent. With the exception of one pocket in the city, Kelowna is quite homogenous in the sense that it is predominantly very white. Thanks to the opening of UBC's Okanagan campus here 6 or so years ago, we're starting to see more heterogeneity, which is quite overdue and I fully welcome. This is a city of middle class to upper class people primarily, so there is sadly some snobbery/unfriendliness between people. Young people are a little more superficial/cold than you'd expect in the Pacific Northwest, but still significantly friendlier than some of the older folks that are more set in their ways. I have loved living here, because it truly is a natural paradise.
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    Aug 05, 2013 6:22 PM GMT
    JDR62 saidScottsdale AZ, who wants to come and play with me in my backyard ?
    gorgeous-sedona-arizona-sunset1_zpsf85e2



    I LOVE Arizona!!! Been to Phoenix and Scottsdale, Sedona and went through Flagstaff(on RT 66!). It's so beautiful and clean and the people are friendly. I can't wait to retire there.
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    Aug 05, 2013 9:17 PM GMT
    I was born and raised in Paris, France. Some people think it must be awesome to grow up here. Some think it must be terrible. In reality it was just normal. It's just... home... Paris is very paradoxical because it has some of the most beautiful and famous sceneries in the world, but also some very crappy places that you could find in the third world. It's famous for luxury, sophistication and romanticism, but people here can be rude, harsh and the downtown can be pretty dirty and smelly. But for me all of this is normal.. just home. A lot of constraints. Having to sigh when the rude baker yells at me, trying to avoid the pickpockets, slalom between the tourists, getting asked money 10 times a day by beggars, having to pack in the not air-conditionned 100 years old metro. But at the end of the day, walking on a 1000 year old pavement, seeing the streets getting golden with the night lighting, and feeling that I am part of something big and old has no price. I am not proud of being Parisian, I am happy.
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    Aug 05, 2013 11:33 PM GMT
    Isugemi saidI was born and raised in Paris, France. Some people think it must be awesome to grow up here. Some think it must be terrible. In reality it was just normal. It's just... home... Paris is very paradoxical because it has some of the most beautiful and famous sceneries in the world, but also some very crappy places that you could find in the third world. It's famous for luxury, sophistication and romanticism, but people here can be rude, harsh and the downtown can be pretty dirty and smelly. But for me all of this is normal.. just home. A lot of constraints. Having to sigh when the rude baker yells at me, trying to avoid the pickpockets, slalom between the tourists, getting asked money 10 times a day by beggars, having to pack in the not air-conditionned 100 years old metro. But at the end of the day, walking on a 1000 year old pavement, seeing the streets getting golden with the night lighting, and feeling that I am part of something big and old has no price. I am not proud of being Parisian, I am happy.


    Interesting! If I may ask, how do Parisians generally act toward American tourists? And are their attitudes different when they encounter Americans who speak French? The reason for my question is one of my travel ambitions is to visit Paris and see the Eiffel Tower. But somehow, I've got a feeling that the reception will not be warm once the residents of Paris find out where I'm from. I hope I'm wrong.
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    Aug 05, 2013 11:35 PM GMT
    Brooklyn. Quite simply my favorite place on Earth.

    538278_3660913366578_613173728_n.jpg
  • deep388

    Posts: 859

    Aug 05, 2013 11:55 PM GMT
    I live in Auckland, New Zealand. It's quite similar to it's sister city L.A. in terms of landscape, weather, coastal/Beaches etc (I get a lot of people who come from the States and say that Auckland city central is much like a lot of Californian cities and I think it is true to some extent...Auckland does resemble L.A and San Fran to some extent, but ten times smaller then compared to it's big, international counterpart).

    Auckland.jpg

    (View of the city)

    It's considered the biggest polynesian capital of the South Pacific and it's a melting pot of different cultures, mainly: European Descent (ie:English/Irish/Scottish/Dutch etc), Asians (includ. South and South East Asians), Pacific Islanders and Maoris with smaller but noticeable percentages of other Europeans, Hispanic/Latino's, Middle Eastern and Africans (mainly from Ethopia, Somalia, Kenya it seems...although there are also Afro-Carribeans present).

    Auckland (known as the "Big Small City") is big enough, area wise, that you can live in the type of area that suits your outlook on life...You have areas that have rural views or parks in the middle of a city, views of the sea and sandy beaches, place that consist of mainly shopping outlets and fashion boutiques as well as gay suburbia (usually more concentrated around the CBD).

    Of course the trick is to be able to find work or a source of income "close" to your favourite suburb and this can be difficult, and you need a vehicel to get around (We have quite a poor transport system that has yet to reach any of the standards found in Australia...in fact, most of the run down trains they had were given to us).

    Nevertheless there are places in many cool suburbs close to easy motorway (sorry that's Freeway or Highway) travelling, or express busways, or train stations which can make travelling easier provided where you work is in the right place. It's a nice and very simple city.
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    Aug 06, 2013 1:51 AM GMT
    Blakes7 said[quote][cite]Aristoshark

    Now in Boca Raton FL, living here:

    inc_getphoto.asp?w=18&m=R3342266



    Do you play Mahjong with the other old ladies?? icon_biggrin.gif[/quote]

    What's wrong with Mahjong? You ever played it? Try it, it's not just for us old geezers anymore. icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 06, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    MCB17 saidBrooklyn. Quite simply my favorite place on Earth.

    538278_3660913366578_613173728_n.jpg


    Good food! Coney Island side shows!
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    Aug 06, 2013 1:58 AM GMT
    You guys are soooo lucky. Beautiful places with great history. I live in Florida, woo hoo. Only problem is, it's Jacksonville. Ugh, Great place to grow up. Close to the beach and was a fun place to live. Now, not so much. I would not recommend it to anyone who is making a trip to Fla. Unless you are coming for a Jag game or the WLOCP.
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    Aug 06, 2013 1:59 AM GMT
    I was calling him an old jewish lady with a big mole on her upper lip, sitting around playing Mah Jong and cards while eating potato chips double-dipped in sour cream. It was another silly attempt at making a joke and failing. Only those familiar with old NY and Florida jews would understand the stereotype. See why I'd make a horrible comedian?
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    Aug 06, 2013 2:13 AM GMT
    I saw the humor and smiled. I'm sure Sharky will as well. But really, give the game a try. It's fun. Find a person from the Philipines to play with. They take that shit serious, or at least the ones I've known did.
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    Aug 06, 2013 2:34 AM GMT
    I've played tei pei, or however it's spelled, on the computer, that's about it. I know a philipino, I'll ask him about it. Right now I'm trying to develop a new habit of staying physically active. I've been on realjock for almost a year, it's about time I became one (again).
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    Aug 06, 2013 3:01 AM GMT
    I grew up in a southern, stereotypical Texan town. During football season on Fridays, shops would literally close for the the game. We got a lot of tourists during the rodeo in February and spring break. They had to drive through the town to get to the beach. I now live in New Orleans. Sure, there are good and bad things about it, but I am glad I live here. There is no other city like it in the U.S.