"Qi" and "xi" should not be Scrabble words.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 06, 2013 1:37 PM GMT
    I just had to tell somebody.

    If other game features/rules bother you, feel free complain about them in this thread.
  • hins108

    Posts: 4

    Aug 06, 2013 1:56 PM GMT
    They're chinese pin yin, which means they're not in the English dictionary.
  • Kazachok

    Posts: 415

    Aug 06, 2013 2:36 PM GMT
    Maybe I'm taking this too seriously, but I always thought pin yin needed to stay in the textbooks... Wade-Giles always made so much more sense when it comes to daily use.
  • tseca66

    Posts: 26

    Aug 06, 2013 2:49 PM GMT
    QI is the Chinese energy life-force. XI is a Greek letter. Both are admissible according to the Webster's Scrabble dictionary. I particularly like those 11pts.
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    Aug 06, 2013 2:55 PM GMT
    Qi is bullshit. Xi is acceptable.

    Za also needs to go. Mostly because anyone who refers to a pizza as a "za" is insufferable.

    M and P are too easy to use to be worth 4 points in Words With Friends.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 06, 2013 3:17 PM GMT
    tseca66 saidQI is the Chinese energy life-force. XI is a Greek letter. Both are admissible according to the Webster's Scrabble dictionary. I particularly like those 11pts.


    Not just Chinese... Also found spelled Ki in Japanese
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 06, 2013 3:24 PM GMT
    Kazachok saidMaybe I'm taking this too seriously, but I always thought pin yin needed to stay in the textbooks... Wade-Giles always made so much more sense when it comes to daily use.


    I couldn't disagree more. Tsing-tao versus Qingdao? Tsai versus cai? Two completely different sounds are being transliterated the same way ("ts"). Sure, you have to learn pinyin to be able to pronounce it correctly, but I think it's a much better system.

    As for "qi" in scrabble, it's a word that most English speakers know, recognize, and use. Why shouldn't it be accepted? icon_confused.gif
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    Aug 06, 2013 5:31 PM GMT
    Why not? I've won several games with those little gems! LOL
  • Kazachok

    Posts: 415

    Aug 06, 2013 5:46 PM GMT
    Bunjamon said
    Kazachok saidMaybe I'm taking this too seriously, but I always thought pin yin needed to stay in the textbooks... Wade-Giles always made so much more sense when it comes to daily use.


    I couldn't disagree more. Tsing-tao versus Qingdao? Tsai versus cai? Two completely different sounds are being transliterated the same way ("ts"). Sure, you have to learn pinyin to be able to pronounce it correctly, but I think it's a much better system.

    As for "qi" in scrabble, it's a word that most English speakers know, recognize, and use. Why shouldn't it be accepted? icon_confused.gif

    No, Tsing-tao is the postal Romanization name. Wade-Giles has it as Ch'ing-tao. I like wade more because the apostrophe tells you when to aspirate.
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    Aug 06, 2013 6:24 PM GMT
    wvufan87 saidWhy not? I've won several games with those little gems! LOL


    agreed - they are the handiest words in the game
  • mizu5

    Posts: 2599

    Aug 06, 2013 7:09 PM GMT
    Those words are really only sue by people who aren't clever enough to come up with anything better.





    And I've used them on occasion. lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 06, 2013 8:23 PM GMT
    The sanctioned two letter word list and definitions for scrabble. This list is the key to winning.

    AA: n pl. –S rough, cindery lava
    AB: n pl. –S an abdominal muscle
    AD: n pl. –S an advertisement
    AE: adj one
    AG: adj pertaining to agriculture
    AH: interj – used to express delight, relief, or contempt
    AI: n pl. –S a three-toed sloth
    AL: n pl. –S an East Indian tree
    AM: present 1st person sing. of BE
    AN: indefinite article – used before words beginning with a vowel
    AR: n pl. –S the letter R
    AS: adv to the same degree
    AT: prep in the position of
    AW: interj – used to express protest, disgust, or disbelief
    AX: v –ED, -ING, -ES to work on with an ax (a type of cutting tool)
    AY: n pl. –S aye
    BA: n pl. –S the eternal soul in Egyptian mythology
    BE: v AM, ARE, ART, WAS, WERE, WAST, WERT, BEEN, BEING to have actuality
    BI: n pl. –S bisexual
    BO: n pl. –S a pal
    BY: n pl. –S a pass in certain card games
    DE: prep of; from – used in names
    DO: n pl. –S the first tone of the diatonic scale
    ED: n pl. –S education
    EF: n pl. –S the letter F
    EH: interj – used to express doubt
    EL: n pl. –S an elevated railroad or train
    EM: n pl. –S the letter M
    EN: n pl. –S the letter M
    ER: interj – used to express hesitation
    ES: n pl. ESES the letter S (also spelled ESS)
    ET: a past tense of EAT
    EX: n pl. EXES the letter X
    FA: n pl. –S the fourth tone of the diatonic musical scale
    FE: n –FES a Hebrew letter
    GO: v WENT, GONE, GOING, GOES to move along
    HA: n pl. –S a sound of surprise
    HE: n pl. –S a male person
    HI: interj – used as a greeting
    HM: interj – used to express thoughtful consideration
    HO: interj – used to express surprise
    ID: n pl. –S a part of the psyche
    IF: n pl. –S a possibility
    IN: v INNED, INNING, INS to harvest
    IS: v present 3d person sing. of BE
    IT: pron the 3rd person sing. of BE
    JO: n pl. -ES a sweetheart
    KA: n pl. –S the spiritual self of a human being in Egyptian religion
    KI: n pl. -S the vital force in Chinese thought
    LA: n pl. –S the sixth tone of the diatonic musical scale
    LI: n pl. a Chinese unit of distance
    LO: interj – used to attract attention or to express surprise
    MA: n pl. –S mother
    ME: pron the objective case of the pronoun I
    MM: interj – Used to express assent or satisfaction
    MO: n pl. –S a moment
    MU: n pl. –S a Greek letter
    MI: n pl. –MIS the third tone of the diatonic musical scale
    MY: pron the possessive form of the pronoun I
    NA: adv no; not
    NE: adj born with the name of (also NEE)
    NO: n pl. NOS or NOES a negative reply
    NU: n pl. –S a Greek letter
    OD: n pl. –S a hypothetical force of natural power
    OE: n pl. –S a whirlwind off the Faeroe Islands
    OF: prep coming from
    OH: v –ED, -ING, -S to exclaim in surprise, pain, or desire
    OI: v – oy--used to express dismay or pain
    OM: n pl. –S a mantra used in contemplation of ultimate reality
    ON: n pl. –S the side of the wicket where a batsman stands in cricket
    OP: n pl. –S a style of abstract art
    OR: n pl. –S the heraldic color gold
    OS: n pl. –S ORA, OSSA, or OSAR either an orifice, a bone, or an esker
    OW: interj – used to express sudden pain
    OX: n pl. OXEN or OXES a hoofed mammal or clumsy person
    OY: interj – used to express dismay or pain
    PA: n pl. –S a father
    PE: n pl. –S a Hebrew letter
    PI: v PIED, PIEING, PIING, or PIES to jumble or disorder
    QI: n pl. -S the vital force that in Chinese thought is inherent in all things
    RE: n pl. –S the second tone of diatonic musical scale
    SH: interj – used to urge silence
    SI: n pl. –S ti
    SO: n pl. –S the fifth tone of the diatonic musical scale
    TA: n pl. –S an expression of gratitude
    TO: prep in the direction of
    TI: n TIS the seventh tone of the diatonic musical scale
    UH: interj – used to express hesitation
    UM: interj – used to express hesitation
    UN: pron pl. –S one
    UP: v UPPED, UPPING, UPS to raise
    US: pron the objective case of the pronoun we
    UT: n pl. –S the musical tone C in the French solmization system, now replaced by do
    WE: pron the 1st person pl. pronoun in the nominative case
    WO: n pl. –S woe
    XI: n pl. –S a Greek letter
    XU: n pl. XU a monetary unit of Vietnam
    YA: pron you
    YE: pron you
    YO: interj – used to call attention or express affirmation
    ZA: n pl. -S a pizza
  • tegga8

    Posts: 59

    Aug 06, 2013 9:17 PM GMT
    I the UK we also allow the following. Sorry for any repeats:
    ch, da, di, ea, ee, fy, gi, gu, io, ja, ko, ky, ny, ob, oo, ou, po, st, te, ug, ur, yu, zo.

    By the way, I think I once read that 'QI' is actually the most common word played in the game.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 07, 2013 5:11 AM GMT
    I did not mean to suggest that "qi" and "xi" are not words; I was merely complaining that they are Scrabble cop outs.

    I am, as it turns out, fairly terrible at Scrabble in both my languages.