How to break through a plateau?

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    Aug 06, 2013 6:30 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    I've been training for a couple years on and off. And as all people find out at the beginning, the gains are fast, you gain 5 or so lbs of muscle, you notice wider shoulders, a more V shape for your torso, bigger pecs, biceps, triceps, legs, etc...

    Then you hit a plateau. My mistake was not acting fast when I hit that plateau. And I have been there for a while now, a year or so (although that may be because of my irregular training habits).

    So how can I break through a plateau in lifting more weights? I know diet is very important, but does it affect the amount of weight I can lift directly?

    How about having a spotter so I can push myself to lift more weights with help at first, in order to be able to handle them alone in subsequent tries?

    Thanks
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    Aug 06, 2013 8:07 PM GMT
    I broke through a plateau by sorting out my core strength which made it much easier to support the heavier weights.
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    Aug 06, 2013 8:10 PM GMT
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bbinfo.php?page=PlateauBusting
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    Aug 06, 2013 8:18 PM GMT
    Hire a personal trainer like myself. I am known for putting through my clients through workouts nobody has seen before!!icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 06, 2013 9:04 PM GMT
    A couple of quick tips:
    If your bench plateaus, leave the bench alone for a few weeks and do flyes, etc., ie., something quite out of the ordinary for your routine. Return to the bench and work your way back up and through the plateau. Continue switching your routine when you hit the plateaus.

    If you level off, I suggest adding 5-10 lbs. to your top set. Make sure you have a spotter, and even though you do less reps the lower weight will feel comparatively light and you can break through. Also, doing negatives with the slightly higher weight (again, with an experienced spotter) will help bust it up.

    Look at your diet carefully. Enough protein at the right times? Keep your carbohydrates complex (stay away from sugars, processed flour/dough/cookies, etc.) and abundant for energy. Oh, if the label says "Energy Bar," generally don't eat it. Cooked rice, vegetables & fruits.

    Getting enough rest? Or too much? Give each muscle at least 36 hours to recuperate, up to 48. Too much rest and your body grows accustomed to the light load and scales the muscle's resources back. Too little rest and your muscle can't be repaired in time and eventually atrophies.

    Do not stretch before a workout. Instead, work out with very light weights slowly to warm up the muscle before going for your peak. Lots of warmup is better than little.

    What's your peak time of day? Some people are at their peak in the morning, some in the afternoon or evening. See your best gains at your best time, but make sure your body doesn't grow accustomed to that time--and mix it up.

    Work complementary muscles from time-to-time (biceps AND triceps day every few weeks).

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    Aug 06, 2013 9:36 PM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidA couple of quick tips:
    If your bench plateaus, leave the bench alone for a few weeks and do flyes, etc., ie., something quite out of the ordinary for your routine. Return to the bench and work your way back up and through the plateau. Continue switching your routine when you hit the plateaus.

    If you level off, I suggest adding 5-10 lbs. to your top set. Make sure you have a spotter, and even though you do less reps the lower weight will feel comparatively light and you can break through. Also, doing negatives with the slightly higher weight (again, with an experienced spotter) will help bust it up.

    Look at your diet carefully. Enough protein at the right times? Keep your carbohydrates complex (stay away from sugars, processed flour/dough/cookies, etc.) and abundant for energy. Oh, if the label says "Energy Bar," generally don't eat it. Cooked rice, vegetables & fruits.

    Getting enough rest? Or too much? Give each muscle at least 36 hours to recuperate, up to 48. Too much rest and your body grows accustomed to the light load and scales the muscle's resources back. Too little rest and your muscle can't be repaired in time and eventually atrophies.

    Do not stretch before a workout. Instead, work out with very light weights slowly to warm up the muscle before going for your peak. Lots of warmup is better than little.

    What's your peak time of day? Some people are at their peak in the morning, some in the afternoon or evening. See your best gains at your best time, but make sure your body doesn't grow accustomed to that time--and mix it up.

    Work complementary muscles from time-to-time (biceps AND triceps day every few weeks).



    Amazing tips buddy. I suspect it's a combination of nutrition, rest and a routine training program. Will try some of these tips and let you know if they work out for me icon_smile.gif Thanks again
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    Aug 06, 2013 9:36 PM GMT
    darius30 saidhttp://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bbinfo.php?page=PlateauBusting


    Will check those as well. Tnx
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    Aug 07, 2013 3:40 AM GMT
    Breaking a Plateau - #1 Increase your Macros; #2 Switch up your exercises once a month; #3 Increase your Macros icon_razz.gif
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    Aug 07, 2013 7:05 AM GMT
    Exprexxion saidBreaking a Plateau - #1 Increase your Macros; #2 Switch up your exercises once a month; #3 Increase your Macros icon_razz.gif


    Macros as in meals?