How to Land an Airbus A-380 at SFO

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    Aug 07, 2013 4:46 PM GMT
    https://www.youtube.com/v/AfHl87p7X5o

    Lufthansa, so some accompaniment of Wagner at the end. (Lohengrin or Meistersinger - I can't remember which. Any operaphiles on here?) Lohengrin would be appropriate, since it is a great big bird.
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    Aug 07, 2013 5:20 PM GMT
    Thanks for posting this! It was beautifully done. Great views of the Bay Area from the air - from the Golden Gate Bridge to Silicon Valley.
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    Aug 07, 2013 6:50 PM GMT
    Very cool. I had to laugh at the lufthansa.com on the side of the airplane. Why were the airplane's cockpit displays in English? Does it make things easier to switch to the language that the control tower is using?
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    Aug 07, 2013 6:58 PM GMT
    Puppenjunge saidhttps://www.youtube.com/v/AfHl87p7X5o

    Lufthansa, so some accompaniment of Wagner at the end. (Lohengrin or Meistersinger - I can't remember which. Any operaphiles on here?) Lohengrin would be appropriate, since it is a great big bird.


    For take off we could use Vaughan Williams Lark Ascending

    Great clip though. Enjoyed it much.
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    Aug 07, 2013 7:01 PM GMT
    An airplane story of mine.

    Back in the 70s I was in the Navy on an aircraft carrier. Both takeoffs and landings are interesting. For the takeoff a steam catapult literally throws the jet off the ship; the jet doesn't have enough power to take off by itself. For both takeoffs and landings the ship is steaming as fast as it can, into the wind. For the landings the jet has to touch down in just the right spot for the tail hook to snag these monster steel cables, called the arresting cables or arresting gear. When they snag one the cable is reeled out at a controlled rate. Because they may miss the cables they apply full power at the moment they touch down in order to keep going and try again. If things were slow in the shop where I worked I'd go up to the observation deck and watch flight ops. You often saw planes missing the arresting cables; it was obviously quite tricky.

    One time I was on a Navy regular airline type of jet, 727 or somesuch, transporting a bunch of us sailors to San Diego. It was at night and a little foggy. The pilots that fly those probably have never taken off or landed on an aircraft carrier. We're coming in for the landing and for whatever reason the pilot didn't make the runway just right and suddenly we feel him applying full power and taking back off, doing what's called a touch and go. After all of us having watched aircraft carrier pilots landing on the carrier we were a little freaked out to think that this pilot was having trouble hitting the runway. The runway at an airport is huge compared to how small it is on an aircraft carrier. And it's not moving, and bouncing up and down. A true wtf moment.
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    Aug 09, 2013 12:14 AM GMT
    That was amazing. I've wondered what it was like in the cockpit to land such a beast. Thank you for sharing this.
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    Aug 09, 2013 12:47 AM GMT
    Lumpynose saidVery cool. I had to laugh at the lufthansa.com on the side of the airplane. Why were the airplane's cockpit displays in English? Does it make things easier to switch to the language that the control tower is using?


    Actually English is the standard language used in international flying - at least in the Western world, most of Asia and Africa.
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    Aug 09, 2013 12:48 AM GMT
    psblond said
    Lumpynose saidVery cool. I had to laugh at the lufthansa.com on the side of the airplane. Why were the airplane's cockpit displays in English? Does it make things easier to switch to the language that the control tower is using?


    Actually English is the standard language used in international flying - at least in the Western world, most of Asia and Africa.

    Ah hah; thanks. I had no idea.
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    Aug 09, 2013 12:59 AM GMT
    Another airplane story. I read this in a flying magazine. It was one of those last page stories, inside the back cover. This was long ago, in the 70s that I read this.

    Some of the airline pilots for 747s believed this urban rumor, so to speak, that if the leading edges were left in the out and down position that it would save fuel. The leading edges are just what it sounds like, they're on the leading edges of the wings and you can see them go forward and out and down when the plane is landing (and taking off as well perhaps).

    The leading edges retract by themselves when the plane reaches a certain speed, or something; it's automatic. In order to force them to stay out the pilots would pull some circuit breaker to override the automatic retraction.

    So on this 747 the pilot had done this and they're cruising along. But at high speed the leading edges got torn off and this jumbo 747 full of passengers starts to fall out of the sky. You can imagine the pandemonium in the airplane.

    As it happened the pilot also did stunt flying and had an idea of what to do and wrestled with the airplane and managed to pull it out of the nose dive fairly close to the ground.

    Sounds sort of far-fetched but it was an interesting story.
  • mr_bijae

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    Aug 09, 2013 1:04 AM GMT
    I love to fly. that was an awesome clip! Thanks for posting that!
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    Aug 09, 2013 1:41 AM GMT
    Great post. The 380 is one mighty airship. Only a dozen or so US airports can handle them.
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    Aug 09, 2013 1:44 AM GMT
    Unfortunately, this thread will have to be removed now. The pilot said "retard" and I'm sure the PC Police will report it.

  • Aug 09, 2013 2:10 AM GMT
    Puppenjunge saidhttps://www.youtube.com/v/AfHl87p7X5o

    Lufthansa, so some accompaniment of Wagner at the end. (Lohengrin or Meistersinger - I can't remember which. Any operaphiles on here?) Lohengrin would be appropriate, since it is a great big bird.


    The music is actually from Tannhäuser. The Pilgrims' chorus theme.
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    Aug 09, 2013 2:35 AM GMT
    wow, they make it look so easy! Nice job, love to be a passenger in a landing like this.
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    Aug 09, 2013 2:47 AM GMT
    Lumpynose said
    psblond said
    Lumpynose saidVery cool. I had to laugh at the lufthansa.com on the side of the airplane. Why were the airplane's cockpit displays in English? Does it make things easier to switch to the language that the control tower is using?

    Actually English is the standard language used in international flying - at least in the Western world, most of Asia and Africa.

    Ah hah; thanks. I had no idea.

    English is the common language for airlines that fly internationally. If a common language was not used it would be impossible for airplanes to safely fly over countries that spoke a language other than that of the originating country. The crews could not communicate with the air control operations of those countries whose airspace they entered, creating obvious safety & security problems.
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    Aug 09, 2013 3:11 AM GMT
    Gymguy_FL saidGreat post. The 380 is one mighty airship. Only a dozen or so US airports can handle them.


    The A380 is indeed a nice plane - flew it on Thai Air from Frankfurt to Bangkok a few months ago - although I prefer Lufthansa's Boeing 747-800 (newest version) which I flew on the first leg of that trip from LAX to Frankfurt. Coming home from Singapore the Boeing 777-ER seemed mundane by comparison to both of them even with Cathay Pacific's superb trans-Pacific service.
  • groundcombat

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    Aug 09, 2013 3:31 AM GMT
    I never get this view on approach to SFO but it's probably because I'm always coming from the south via LAX.
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    Aug 09, 2013 4:19 AM GMT
    Lumpynose saidVery cool. I had to laugh at the lufthansa.com on the side of the airplane. Why were the airplane's cockpit displays in English? Does it make things easier to switch to the language that the control tower is using?


    Air traffic control is in English world wide.
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    Aug 09, 2013 4:25 AM GMT
    ColumbusOH_Russ said
    Puppenjunge saidhttps://www.youtube.com/v/AfHl87p7X5o

    Lufthansa, so some accompaniment of Wagner at the end. (Lohengrin or Meistersinger - I can't remember which. Any operaphiles on here?) Lohengrin would be appropriate, since it is a great big bird.


    The music is actually from Tannhäuser. The Pilgrims' chorus theme.


    Actually it's from "What's Opera, Doc"

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    Aug 09, 2013 5:35 AM GMT
    Beautiful! I've made that landing so many times, but never have seen it from those viewpoints.

    Here's the video embeded.

  • ChicagoSteve

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    Aug 09, 2013 11:57 AM GMT
    Puppenjunge saidhttps://www.youtube.com/v/AfHl87p7X5o

    Lufthansa, so some accompaniment of Wagner at the end. (Lohengrin or Meistersinger - I can't remember which. Any operaphiles on here?) Lohengrin would be appropriate, since it is a great big bird.


    Great video, thanks for posting!
  • MikemikeMike

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    Aug 09, 2013 2:17 PM GMT
    I love the first 2 Airplane movies. When they are aware they might crash and the movie playing is plane crashes.icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Plus when she blows up the autopilot.
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    Aug 09, 2013 5:17 PM GMT
    ColumbusOH_Russ said
    Puppenjunge saidhttps://www.youtube.com/v/AfHl87p7X5o

    Lufthansa, so some accompaniment of Wagner at the end. (Lohengrin or Meistersinger - I can't remember which. Any operaphiles on here?) Lohengrin would be appropriate, since it is a great big bird.


    The music is actually from Tannhäuser. The Pilgrims' chorus theme.

    Thanks. Another opera I have never seen, but heard only on recordings.
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    Aug 09, 2013 5:42 PM GMT
    Great to see! Thanks for posting.

    Many of you are too young to know that there was a time you had to 'advance' or 'retard' the timing on your car manually.