Is 3-4 hours sleep healthy?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 10, 2013 7:41 PM GMT
    For the past year ever since starting my first year at university. I only get around 3-4 hours sleep. I am extremely busy every single day of the week juggling with paid work, studies and cardio at the gym. I only eat one meal a day due to the lack of time I have, which was one of the contributing factors for my weightloss programme (wasnt followed properly but I managed to lose loads of fat which was my goal).

    Since my summer vacation, I still work my same contracted hours at my job in a supermarket which is 24 hours per week. However, I cannot sleep for more than 4 hours, say if I go to bed at 9......I won't fall asleep until 2/3ish in the morning, and by 6 am I wake up naturally without feeling sluggish or exhausted.

    Will there be any long-term side affects? Bare in mind currently I am experiencing no problems with 4 hours sleep and am capable with my cardio at the gym and one meal a day since I am no longer hungry in the mornings or evenings.
  • andrewisi

    Posts: 13

    Aug 11, 2013 3:28 AM GMT
    :/ Longterm lack of sleep is terrible for brain, heart, skin, physique- the list goes on.

    If you are active, your body should crave more sleep, so I think it must have to do with your mind. You are nonstop, but it is very important to make room for yourself to relax before bedtime - meditation, goal list, or whatever it takes to make your mind at peace despite the circumstances of the day (and the next)..
    If possible, try to use your bedroom for sleeping only (no reading/tv/chilling) to associate sweet dreams with it. If you can't fall asleep after awhile, go do something outside of it and try again later. Best of luck.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 3:30 AM GMT
    no....just straight up, no
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 4:20 AM GMT
    Unfortunately, I've been doing it since college... 1995+ icon_sad.gif

    Cheers,

    Sean
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Aug 11, 2013 4:35 AM GMT
    Are you manic? Have you tried lithium?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 4:51 AM GMT
    No, it's not healthy.
    you may feel like you don't need it, but the effects will not show right away.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Aug 11, 2013 5:20 AM GMT
    When you're dead, you won't really care that your sleep deprivation was unhealthy. So live fast and die young icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 11:17 AM GMT
    Hell no! I can't do without my 10hours a day. . . .but that prob aint healthy eithericon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 11:22 AM GMT
    That's kind of unhealthy...but it's going to be like that for me in two weeks icon_neutral.gif
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Aug 11, 2013 12:08 PM GMT
    andrewisi said:/ Longterm lack of sleep is terrible for brain, heart, skin, physique- the list goes on.

    If you are active, your body should crave more sleep, so I think it must have to do with your mind. You are nonstop, but it is very important to make room for yourself to relax before bedtime - meditation, goal list, or whatever it takes to make your mind at peace despite the circumstances of the day (and the next)..
    If possible, try to use your bedroom for sleeping only (no reading/tv/chilling) to associate sweet dreams with it. If you can't fall asleep after awhile, go do something outside of it and try again later. Best of luck.



    I found reading a couple of pages of a really boring book (interesting subject by a prof. who you know must have whole lecture theatres snoring away within minutes) sent me off quickly. Those 1200 pages cured any insomnia for years.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Aug 11, 2013 5:32 PM GMT
    GeekZN saidHell no! I can't do without my 10hours a day. . . .but that prob aint healthy eithericon_rolleyes.gif

    Why do you think rest may be unhealthy?
  • Montague

    Posts: 5205

    Aug 11, 2013 5:37 PM GMT
    The_Guruburu said
    GeekZN saidHell no! I can't do without my 10hours a day. . . .but that prob aint healthy eithericon_rolleyes.gif

    Why do you think rest may be unhealthy?


    you get fat!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 5:44 PM GMT
    Lack of sleep is not good for your health. Here you have some effects!
    Thanks

    http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/excessive-sleepiness-10/10-results-sleep-loss?page=2
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 5:44 PM GMT
    A few questions: is it very bright in your room when you awaken from sleep? Is your sleep schedule necessitated by your job (and crimped by your 2 AM natural bedtime)? Are you on medication?

    If you are allowed to sleep longer than 6 AM, have you tried an eye cover or a darkened room?
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Aug 11, 2013 5:46 PM GMT
    Montague said
    The_Guruburu said
    GeekZN saidHell no! I can't do without my 10hours a day. . . .but that prob aint healthy eithericon_rolleyes.gif

    Why do you think rest may be unhealthy?


    you get fat!

    You get fat from sleeping.

    ...

    Education, y u fail us?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 5:52 PM GMT
    SharpX saidFor the past year ever since starting my first year at university. I only get around 3-4 hours sleep. I am extremely busy every single day of the week juggling with paid work, studies and cardio at the gym. I only eat one meal a day due to the lack of time I have, which was one of the contributing factors for my weightloss programme (wasnt followed properly but I managed to lose loads of fat which was my goal).

    Since my summer vacation, I still work my same contracted hours at my job in a supermarket which is 24 hours per week. However, I cannot sleep for more than 4 hours, say if I go to bed at 9......I won't fall asleep until 2/3ish in the morning, and by 6 am I wake up naturally without feeling sluggish or exhausted.

    Will there be any long-term side affects? Bare in mind currently I am experiencing no problems with 4 hours sleep and am capable with my cardio at the gym and one meal a day since I am no longer hungry in the mornings or evenings.


    Your behavior is a prescription for disaster.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 6:46 PM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidA few questions: is it very bright in your room when you awaken from sleep? Is your sleep schedule necessitated by your job (and crimped by your 2 AM natural bedtime)? Are you on medication?

    If you are allowed to sleep longer than 6 AM, have you tried an eye cover or a darkened room?


    My bedroom is very dark. I am on no medication. When I wake up from bed things look normal. I do not quite understand by your question regarding sleep schedule necessitated with my job? =)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 6:49 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    SharpX saidFor the past year ever since starting my first year at university. I only get around 3-4 hours sleep. I am extremely busy every single day of the week juggling with paid work, studies and cardio at the gym. I only eat one meal a day due to the lack of time I have, which was one of the contributing factors for my weightloss programme (wasnt followed properly but I managed to lose loads of fat which was my goal).

    Since my summer vacation, I still work my same contracted hours at my job in a supermarket which is 24 hours per week. However, I cannot sleep for more than 4 hours, say if I go to bed at 9......I won't fall asleep until 2/3ish in the morning, and by 6 am I wake up naturally without feeling sluggish or exhausted.

    Will there be any long-term side affects? Bare in mind currently I am experiencing no problems with 4 hours sleep and am capable with my cardio at the gym and one meal a day since I am no longer hungry in the mornings or evenings.


    Your behavior is a prescription for disaster.


    I generally got on fine with life though. I get work done at my job and scrape good grades at school, and cardio at the gym is no issue. I just wanted to know since I am doing fine now, is it safe the way I'm heading?
  • Montague

    Posts: 5205

    Aug 11, 2013 6:56 PM GMT
    The_Guruburu said
    Montague said
    The_Guruburu said
    GeekZN saidHell no! I can't do without my 10hours a day. . . .but that prob aint healthy eithericon_rolleyes.gif

    Why do you think rest may be unhealthy?


    you get fat!

    You get fat from sleeping.

    ...

    Education, y u fail us?


    I know right? Obviously you can't read in depth and see all that time resting means you must be lazy.
  • 1sub2bind4use

    Posts: 20

    Aug 11, 2013 8:08 PM GMT
    No one knows the absolute answer for all of us. And it's very hard to tell what's at cause for those just starting out in there growth after puberty & teenage growth spurts.

    Most of us, in our older years, if we don't have the rare & so admirable "lean genes" (passed down in our family - if your parents aren't naturally lean, chances are there are no miracles happening for you, it's just temporary) or bodies will start to show different & unexpected results ('cause this is your first time in the growth process of life).

    Look at all of us older guys & ask us what struggles we've gone through to make up for our wild, excited & (what we think is) the unique results we thought were happening because we were special, & we had some amazing handle on how life works, & how our body & mind works.

    It's common during human development (especially boys/men) to think we're possibly "the one" (I think it's called, "the messiah syndrome), and we have some special "powers" & abilities beyond everyone one else, or we "have it all down", or, "handled".

    You might actually have something, but 80 or more percent of us after our late 20's, after growth hormones have done whatever they're gonna do, have started to show signs of struggle reflective of our "unique recipe" of how we've some how singularly come across the secret miracle to doing it all better then anyone else has ever come up with, with lasting results.

    I used to tan everyday thinking I figured out how to do it so I wouldn't damage my skin like those who did, smoke cigarettes as though I was the invulnerable one to it's dangers, & get wasted everyday to prove I could live through it better then anyone else has ever done (or die a hero because I beat old age & conformity). Now, in my 50's, I didn't get cancer or die from getting wasted, tanning or smoking, but my liver & mental skills have suffered a bit & my skin has lost it's elasticity, & my body's natural healthy cravings & needs have been altered so much I can't really tell what it naturally needs (which happens with fast food & other overly processed foods, by the way).

    We are all unique, but not all that much different. What's recommended by most experts for all of us to follow as healthy is a good guideline to start with, & slight modifications, depending on your family genes and your personal body & lifestyle desires, can make the valuable difference in creating & maintaining what outcomes you want, but if it's drastic, look at & ask us older folk, from our own actual experiences (not what we THINK might happen) how our habits could have possibly taxed us in the long run.

    I, personally, since the age of 16 admired lean skinny body types & tried so hard to come up with "the secret" to living skinny. It wasn't naturally in my genes, so I knew I needed to alter my habits. I reduced my calorie intake & that worked for awhile during my late teens, early 20's, but after awhile I was feeling too hungry & gaining weight. I added diet pills, but that wasn't realistic for a lifetime habit. I added exercise but didn't have enough energy, and the pills were making it hard to sleep, so I was extra tired & my heart was racing. My metabolism was messed up, along with other things thet would have benefit my intended outcomes & desires, but I didn't know I was defeating the purpose.

    It took me years (& still pretty much working on it) to evolve my habits from unrealistic to much more realistic, and it's all looking more & more like what most experts have been learning through out the years: eat the best nutrients for your body to work at it's best, have at least 8 hours of sleep each night, keep at least an hour's worth of physical heart elevating activity available each day, drink plenty of water, eliminate stress by loving yourself & those around you with understanding & compassion while you continue to practice creating a healthy you, and building on the opportunities thet really light you up (never regretting where you are & what you don't have), and for those of you who want bigger muscles, add strength building workouts.

    [Even for us older folk, it's our first time going through all of this. We've never been older then we are now, but we continue to get older then all the new kids born & we all try our best to figure out how to do it best. We older folk have done it before you, but we don't necessarily know any better, and we still don't necessarily know all, though we might think we do.]
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Aug 11, 2013 8:16 PM GMT
    You're a college student, have you tried Googling sleep deprivation? Sleep has been shown to be more and more important when it comes to memory retention. 60 Minutes and CBS News have done some great reports over the last couple of years.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18560_162-3939721.html

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-3445_162-57394985/the-perils-of-sleep-deprivation/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 14, 2013 2:42 PM GMT
    Please don't deprive the sleep you deserve. Right now it may be ok but Stress and impatience may come to haunt you later. And if you are working out in the gym, sufficient rest again is required.

    Take care.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Aug 14, 2013 3:37 PM GMT
    Montague said
    The_Guruburu said
    Montague said
    The_Guruburu said
    GeekZN saidHell no! I can't do without my 10hours a day. . . .but that prob aint healthy eithericon_rolleyes.gif

    Why do you think rest may be unhealthy?


    you get fat!

    You get fat from sleeping.

    ...

    Education, y u fail us?


    I know right? Obviously you can't read in depth and see all that time resting means you must be lazy.

    You don't know much about sleep health, do you?icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 09, 2013 2:12 AM GMT
    I believe you should get at least 6 hrs a night
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Oct 09, 2013 2:14 AM GMT
    And the cause of those dark rings under your eyes is...?

    Ask any doctor, even the nurse at your campus health center and you will be told that 3-4 hours of sleep is not enough.