Words that are rendered meaningless.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2013 5:10 PM GMT
    How did we come to live in a world where the phrase "that's cool" can mean anything from "I sincerely admire that" to "I don't really care" to "Screw you" ? ... and do you find this ambiguity useful or frustrating in your interactions with others?
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Aug 11, 2013 5:33 PM GMT
    I would have to say it is fucking awesome for words to have such diversity ... But I am sure there are those that see it as fucked up ... But what the fuck, fuck em'
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    Aug 11, 2013 5:46 PM GMT
    the word "hero" is pretty much meangingless.
    Example: All the people who died in the World Trade Center attack are called heroes. I do not doubt that many of them were heroes, notably the firemen and police officers that rushed to try and rescue those trapped. But simply dying does not make one a hero, even if it was in a terrorist attack.
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    Aug 11, 2013 6:03 PM GMT
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    Aug 11, 2013 8:49 PM GMT
    Right - I would say hero is the number two overused/meaningless word.
    Others are superstar, hit (as in tv show), hilarious, and viral (as in "gone viral" which it probably hasn't).
    The number one overused/meaningless word is LOL - if that's a word. People tack it onto too many posts to show mockery when I really doubt they're laughing out loud. icon_wink.gif
    P.S. I was too lazy to put quotes around the words we're talking about.
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    Aug 11, 2013 9:36 PM GMT
    In acting class long, long years ago we had to perform a play using only the word Oh.

    Oh. (getting the idea)

    Oh. (unimpressed)

    Oh? (curious)

    Oh? (sarcasm)

    Oh. (pain)


    Oh. (pleasure)

    Oh. (brightly, happy with an answer)

    Try this in front of a mirror, add inflection. One word can mean many things. icon_wink.gif

    Try it again using only the word 'really'. Try it again using only the word 'no' or 'yes'. Is it the age of texting that is causing us to lose this skill in spoken language?
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    Aug 11, 2013 9:39 PM GMT
    "Brave", when referring to someone with a serious illness. Bravery is when you choose to battle something, but with disease it's not like you have a choice. I suppose some people can have a disease AND be brave, but just because they're having a rough time of it, does not automatically make them brave.

    Unique idea for a thread by the way.
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    Aug 11, 2013 9:43 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said"Brave", when referring to someone with a serious illness. Bravery is when you choose to battle something, but with disease it's not like you have a choice. I suppose some people can have a disease AND be brave, but just because they're having a rough time of it, does not automatically make them brave.

    Unique idea for a thread by the way.


    Bravery in respect to a serious illness is describing how that particular person is dealing with said illness. icon_wink.gif
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    Aug 11, 2013 9:52 PM GMT
    @ airforce: Bill and I did this with the word Oh one lazy afternoon when my sister was over. She cracked up.

    PS That I made you laugh made my day!

    (you deserve a happy laugh, I think you don't get to do enough of that)

    *hug*
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    Aug 11, 2013 10:04 PM GMT
    meninlove said In acting class long, long years ago we had to perform a play using only the word Oh.

    Oh. (getting the idea)

    etc...

    Try this in front of a mirror, add inflection. One word can mean many things. icon_wink.gif

    Try it again using only the word 'really'. Try it again using only the word 'no' or 'yes'. Is it the age of texting that is causing us to lose this skill in spoken language?

    Oooooh! (amazement, when a huge boner pops out)

    OH! (sudden surprise, when a boner delivers a premature facial)

    Oooooh... (delivering a facial)

    Oooooh... (slipping in the shower together while washing off a facial)

    And yeah, trying those in front of mirrors is fun, the more inflection the better. And trying again, using the word "fuck". icon_wink.gif
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    Aug 11, 2013 10:31 PM GMT
    airforcelungs said
    meninlove said In acting class long, long years ago we had to perform a play using only the word Oh.

    Oh. (getting the idea)

    Oh. (unimpressed)

    Oh? (curious)

    Oh? (sarcasm)

    Oh. (pain)


    Oh. (pleasure)

    Oh. (brightly, happy with an answer)


    Try this in front of a mirror, add inflection. One word can mean many things. icon_wink.gif

    Try it again using only the word 'really'. Try it again using only the word 'no' or 'yes'. Is it the age of texting that is causing us to lose this skill in spoken language?


    LMAO!!!! this had me cracking up.


    Didn't you just say this was pointless or is it just pointless when other people use it?
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    Aug 11, 2013 11:03 PM GMT


    Didn't you just say this was pointless or is it just pointless when other people use it?

    yeah, i said that. i meant it when i said it though. man, i contradict myself a lot. icon_neutral.gif[/quote]

    We probably all do at times. It's all good. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 11, 2013 11:06 PM GMT
    I know, to me this site is not very user friendly. At least not for a dummy like me.
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    Aug 12, 2013 1:46 AM GMT
    I don't think the problems are the words so much as the lies behind them. There are times when people give you a sincere compliment, but it could just be a lie. Words always have ambiguity. But sometimes reading into them too much is the problem.
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    Aug 12, 2013 2:14 AM GMT
    You don't understand. That is the one that gripes my ass. Don't tell me about your shit and when I give you my opinion you say, you don't understand. Bullshit, I understand plenty, you are just too fucking stupid to realize it.
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    Aug 12, 2013 2:56 AM GMT
    meninlove said In acting class long, long years ago we had to perform a play using only the word Oh.

    Oh. (getting the idea)

    Oh. (unimpressed)

    Oh? (curious)

    Oh? (sarcasm)

    Oh. (pain)


    Oh. (pleasure)

    Oh. (brightly, happy with an answer)

    Try this in front of a mirror, add inflection. One word can mean many things. icon_wink.gif

    Try it again using only the word 'really'. Try it again using only the word 'no' or 'yes'. Is it the age of texting that is causing us to lose this skill in spoken language?

    Now try it again using only the word 'dude.'
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    Aug 12, 2013 3:00 AM GMT
    meninlove said
    Scruffypup said"Brave", when referring to someone with a serious illness. Bravery is when you choose to battle something, but with disease it's not like you have a choice. I suppose some people can have a disease AND be brave, but just because they're having a rough time of it, does not automatically make them brave.

    Unique idea for a thread by the way.


    Bravery in respect to a serious illness is describing how that particular person is dealing with said illness. icon_wink.gif


    Yeah, I covered that in my post. But people say that about everyone who's ill.
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    Aug 12, 2013 3:07 AM GMT
    On a more serious note, a word can be rendered meaningless when it is redefined to apply to only one group of people.
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    Aug 12, 2013 4:21 AM GMT
    The word "whatever". It's constantly used in verbal or written debates, especially when the person saying the word is giving up or no longer has anything to add to the conversation.