stationary rowers

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 14, 2008 11:30 PM GMT
    benefits? costs? any big believers in them? please speak up.
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Nov 15, 2008 4:30 AM GMT
    i like them, i'll either use those or an elliptical machine for my cardio. although i prefer the row.

    I have some medical issues, so about 5 minutes on a treadmill i get very nauseous. same for running outside.
    and the crappy seats on the bikes at the gym tend to make me numb in places i really shouldn't be.

    it works the full body, and is low impact.

    as far a cost, i have no clue.
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    Nov 15, 2008 7:34 AM GMT
    its a hell of a workout, one major thing though is that form is absolutely key, if you aren't doing the rowing motion 1. you are cheating yourself of a full workout, 2. you have the chance of messing up your back (as is partially the case with me)

    The payoffs are big, it is a full body workout and i'd highly recommend it if you can do it right, there's nothing worse than seeing someone going through the motions on one of these with horrible form at the gym
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Nov 16, 2008 2:09 PM GMT
    agentorange saidthere's nothing worse than seeing someone going through the motions on one of these with horrible form at the gym


    I agree, i was on one once, and some girl came and started rowing next to me, it's a good thing she wasn't rowing for real, because everyone with her would have had whiplash.
    normally when you have a single whooosh sound per stroke, hers was like 5 steps.

    some of the newer rowers have a display with a power, you want a nice curve. I'm sure her's would have looked like the loch ness monster.
    5graphicdisplays.jpg

    Take it easy the first couple times, till your body gets the movement down.
    try this link for some good basic instructions
    http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/tipsandtricks/ht/HowToRow.htm
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    Nov 16, 2008 2:25 PM GMT
    There is always classes available. Trust me if you are doing it wrong, there will be no benefits. You should barely being using your arms, its all legs and back.
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    Nov 16, 2008 2:26 PM GMT
    glad to see people responding to this. they have one at the gym that I was using... hell of a workout... lot of work to keep going.

    the proper form though... back straight and elbows in, right?
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    Nov 16, 2008 2:33 PM GMT
    I did crew in college and for a bit after and let me tell you, watching someone f themselves up on an erg is painful to watch. Yes, form is everything. EVERYTHING.

    There are plenty of good videos on youtube but here's the best one in my opinion:



    One of the best things about this video is it shows you how to use an erg in more ways than just lugging away on it doing the full sequence.
  • Justbe_NYC

    Posts: 18

    Nov 16, 2008 3:17 PM GMT
    Hi

    First you have to make sure you train on a Concept 2 machine. These have been designed specifically for rowing.


    go check http://www.concept2.com/us/training/technique.asp

    and

    http://www.concept2.co.uk/training/technique_video.php

    Try to find your pace: typically 20-22 stroke per minute for which you could row hours. Then with that same rhythm try to increase the strength.
    I've even done a half marathon once icon_smile.gif at 2min / 500m

    The day you want to drain yourself out you accelerate the pace and increase the the strength. It's tough to reach the same number of stroke per minute on a rowing machine compare to what you could reach in a eight. But don't worry you will easily reach a level that will worn you out. try to keep the 1:30 / 500m as long as you can. But never sacrifice the quality of your stroke (as show on the video) for either pace or strength (you could heart yourself).

    Enjoy

    B
  • tbalsamo

    Posts: 11

    Nov 16, 2008 3:35 PM GMT
    I'm a crew coach at a club in the area and technique is super super super important on an erg. Without proper technique, you can't apply power correctly or efficiently which means 1) you're not getting the workout you could be getting 2) you could potentially hurt yourself 3) you're not going as fast as you could be and 4) when you bring bad technique from an erg to the boat- it's bad news.

    We spend a TON of time just fixing technique issues. Some basic pointers I can give are:
    - Sit up straight, don't hunch your back
    - Keep your shoulders relaxed
    - Bend from your hips

    and most importantly
    -Follow this order of movements from the finish (legs down, hands pulled in to your chest)
    1- Pop your arms out quick from your chest (REALLY fast)
    2- Rotate your torso forward from your hips until you feel tightness in your hamstrings
    3- Lock your torso in place and slowly move up the slide (bring your knees up very slowly- the last 1/4 of the slide should be the slowest)
    4- As you get as far forward as your legs will take you, you should push through your legs (feel a sort of lock as the fan spins up)
    5- After you push through the legs, then swing back with the body, and THEN pull in the arms (REALLY FAST)

    REPEAT

    The ratio of time between the drive (pushing) and the recovery (moving back up the slide) should be 1:3 - This is also VERY IMPORTANT if you plan on rowing in a boat.

    Feel free to ask any questions