Fish farms cause rapid sea-level rise

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 19, 2013 6:21 PM GMT
    This one I don't quite believe. It's really the land sinking, as opposed to the sea rising.

    Groundwater extraction for fish farms can cause land to sink at rates of a quarter-metre a year, according to a study of China’s Yellow River delta1. The subsidence is causing local sea levels to rise nearly 100 times faster than the global average.

    http://www.nature.com/news/fish-farms-cause-rapid-sea-level-rise-1.13569

  • tegga8

    Posts: 59

    Aug 19, 2013 7:57 PM GMT
    What's not to believe? It's an isostatic, rather than eustatic sea level change.
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    Aug 19, 2013 8:04 PM GMT
    tegga8 saidWhat's not to believe? It's an isostatic, rather than eustatic sea level change.


    Perhaps it's not any kind of sea level change at all, but rather a land level change, no?
  • thadjock

    Posts: 2183

    Aug 19, 2013 8:13 PM GMT
    stupid fish farms

    i keep planting caviar and get NOTHING!
  • tegga8

    Posts: 59

    Aug 19, 2013 9:29 PM GMT
    GoNYMets2012 said

    Perhaps it's not any kind of sea level change at all, but rather a land level change, no?


    Yes, that's correct, it is a "land level change". That's generally what isostatic sea level rise is. It's common in places where ice has retreated over the last few thousand years and the land is slowly rising up again, without the additional mass. Draining land is also a recognised cause, but has the opposite affect of causing the land to sink in relation to the sea. It's still a sea level change though, if you live there!
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    Aug 20, 2013 1:30 AM GMT
    tegga8 said
    GoNYMets2012 said

    Perhaps it's not any kind of sea level change at all, but rather a land level change, no?


    Yes, that's correct, it is a "land level change". That's generally what isostatic sea level rise is. It's common in places where ice has retreated over the last few thousand years and the land is slowly rising up again, without the additional mass. Draining land is also a recognised cause, but has the opposite affect of causing the land to sink in relation to the sea. It's still a sea level change though, if you live there!


    I think they are having the same problem along the Gulf Coast.