Cornell, Any current or graduate Big Red's?

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    Aug 21, 2013 11:05 AM GMT
    Cornell University is my top choice for study transfer in 2014, out of all the programs from other U.S. colleges I keep coming back to Cornell. Please share your study experiences, cheers icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 21, 2013 3:10 PM GMT
    lol, Ithaca isn't the greatest way to see America. If I were you, I'd want to go to a big city like New York (Columbia, NYU, U.Chicago, Rice, Harvard) or somewhere in the South rural or otherwise (Vanderbilt, UVA, Davidson, Washington and Lee). Rural New York wouldn't be at the top of my list.

    If you're just choosing based upon "program strength", then Cornell is a fine choice. It's a good school.
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    Aug 21, 2013 3:13 PM GMT
    lol oh yeah Houston is a great way to see America. Dude go to Cornell, Ithaca is fine (and good hockey, lacrosse, soccer)
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    Aug 21, 2013 3:16 PM GMT
    somersault saidlol oh yeah Houston is a great way to see America icon_lol.gif


    Better than Cornell haha, but yea, Rice probably wasn't the greatest example. Houston isn't the coolest city ever, especially to visit. I was trying to just list off some good schools in big cities. Northwestern would be good, too.
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    Aug 21, 2013 3:27 PM GMT
    Thanks for the reply I didn't expect a swift response on this thread lol. I know Ithaca is not NYC but I'm yes looking for program strength rather then a cultural experience, although seeing sites in off time would be great. I have looked at Harvard's program but Cornell is ranked 2 atm in my program and has focuses that appeal to me more, while MIT also looks really great.

    My definite alternatives are Unv Illinois Urbana- Champagne, Georgia Tech and Madison-Wisconsin
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    Aug 21, 2013 5:26 PM GMT
    All I'm saying, allll I'm saying is that I am really biased. Still Virginia Tech is one of the best schools around despite being in Virginia. Cheap rent, college town, not in Georgia, and great academics. Engineering companies go there by the boatload to hire people and the design program is really, really good.

    If your not looking into one of those I would look at VT to see how the program fairs there. There are a few other oddballs that are really good, but not that many. Our business program is an example of one major other universities do better than us.
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    Aug 21, 2013 5:38 PM GMT
    oh, you should go to Harvard, not Cornell, no matter what the rankings say.
  • Destinharbor

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    Aug 21, 2013 6:49 PM GMT
    Heynice2meetya saidThanks for the reply I didn't expect a swift response on this thread lol. I know Ithaca is not NYC but I'm yes looking for program strength rather then a cultural experience, although seeing sites in off time would be great. I have looked at Harvard's program but Cornell is ranked 2 atm in my program and has focuses that appeal to me more, while MIT also looks really great.

    My definite alternatives are Unv Illinois Urbana- Champagne, Georgia Tech and Madison-Wisconsin

    What are the programs that attract you to Cornell? Cornell is tops in some areas. Not so much in others. It is Ivy, sort of.
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    Aug 21, 2013 7:05 PM GMT
    My brother is a current undergrad at Cornell and he likes it.

    Personally it is one my top favorite ivies. The kids there are not as intense compared to Yale, Princeton, or Harvard. The kids are very similar to those you would see at Villanova, Georgetown, Boston College, and Notre Dame.
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    Aug 21, 2013 7:36 PM GMT
    I didn't attend Cornell, but I did spend the summer of 1980 (yes, I'm old...) living in a sublet in Ithaca with a good friend from back home who was an undergrad there. Ithaca is a really cool town and Cornell is a great school if you want to be in a somewhat remote area. The summer I spent living in Collegetown section of Ithaca I worked for Cornell Dining Services and spent lots of time just enjoying the beautiful hills and gorges and waterfalls in the area...

    That was the summer between my freshman and sophomore years at the University of Pennyslvania (Hurrah the Red and the Blue!). Penn was a great school and I loved Philadelphia, but, again I don't know what your field of study is.

    In any event, good luck!
  • WrestlerBoy

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    Aug 21, 2013 7:50 PM GMT
    Heynice2meetya saidThanks for the reply I didn't expect a swift response on this thread lol. I know Ithaca is not NYC but I'm yes looking for program strength rather then a cultural experience, although seeing sites in off time would be great. I have looked at Harvard's program but Cornell is ranked 2 atm in my program and has focuses that appeal to me more, while MIT also looks really great.

    My definite alternatives are Unv Illinois Urbana- Champagne, Georgia Tech and Madison-Wisconsin


    I'm a Yale (College and Law) grad, but even I wouldn't recommend it unless it was precisely for something in which it is ranked #1 (which I guess it isn't in your field). Despite its "handy" proximity to New York, New Haven simply isn't the friendliest town in the country, and we wouldn't want you to get the wrong impression.

    But....I did debate....twice....at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Despite its being, quite literally, in the middle of a cornfield, when that wind blows from the Vet School onto the main campus, it can be quite....sickening: I mean, just DON'T DO IT, man :-)

    Or, it just dawns on me, if you're between Cornell and UIUC, maybe you are involved in agriculture in some way???

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    Aug 21, 2013 8:27 PM GMT
    I went to Georgia Tech. Atlanta was great, and the people I met at GT were some of the most interesting people I've ever met, though granted it takes a bit of filtering out the standard drone engineer.
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    Aug 21, 2013 8:31 PM GMT
    Be warned. Upstate New York winters are cold!
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    Aug 21, 2013 11:39 PM GMT
    KingofDC saidAs a wannabe/reject yellow jacket, I recommend GT. You really can't beat the campus, sports, academics and people. The students can be a bit off but they are some of the most passionate and genuinely intelligent people in the nation. My current roommate attended and loved Cornell but regrets not picking a college in a city with internship/externship opportunities. If you go to GT, you will have the option to work for Georgia Pacific, Southern Company, Coca-Cola, MWV, RockTenn, Suntrust Bank, RaceTrac, Mohawk etc. Due to GTs close proximity to all the major companies, students get hand selected to work for them while in school. It's much harder to get recruited when companies have to work around your travel to interview and bring you to them. Many of my friends went to GT and they all worked during school and were offered incredible jobs. The football stadium looks out over the Atlanta skyline - nothing better. I say be one hell of an engineer! What's the good word!

    Excellent points you are making.

    I have 3 nieces and nephews going through Cornell and they all loved the experience, but shit is that place expensive.
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    Aug 21, 2013 11:44 PM GMT
    Ithaca is, like, dyke central. Not that that is a bad thing...icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 21, 2013 11:46 PM GMT
    I don't know about program strength, but just so you know Ithaca is a little run down. It's not exactly the prettiest "city", but there are definitely uglier ones out there.

    Sungod17 saidBe warned. Upstate New York winters are cold!


    Oh yeah they are. icon_razz.gif We love our snow!
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    Aug 22, 2013 12:10 PM GMT
    Error said


    I knew someone would post this lol, only saw this episode the other day

    PGrooveAll I'm saying, allll I'm saying is that I am really biased. Still Virginia Tech is one of the best schools around despite being in Virginia. Cheap rent, college town, not in Georgia, and great academics. Engineering companies go there by the boatload to hire people and the design program is really, really good.

    If your not looking into one of those I would look at VT to see how the program fairs there. There are a few other oddballs that are really good, but not that many. Our business program is an example of one major other universities do better than us.


    I haven't even looked at Vtech but sadly the only thing I know about it is the awful event in '07 icon_sad.gif However cheap rent sounds good icon_biggrin.gif

    KJSharpoh, you should go to Harvard, not Cornell, no matter what the rankings say.


    Rankings are rankings, I know it will look awesome on your resume but not all employees will regard you better.......who am I kidding yes they will ha ha

    WrestlerBoyI'm a Yale (College and Law) grad, but even I wouldn't recommend it unless it was precisely for something in which it is ranked #1 (which I guess it isn't in your field). Despite its "handy" proximity to New York, New Haven simply isn't the friendliest town in the country, and we wouldn't want you to get the wrong impression.

    But....I did debate....twice....at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Despite its being, quite literally, in the middle of a cornfield, when that wind blows from the Vet School onto the main campus, it can be quite....sickening: I mean, just DON'T DO IT, man :-)

    Or, it just dawns on me, if you're between Cornell and UIUC, maybe you are involved in agriculture in some way???



    I haven't even really thought about Yale, although I do Town Planning and Law. In the QS ranking system many of the Ivies are not even in the top 10 to my surprise.

    I actually wikipedied (good ol wiki lol) UIUC and didn't realise its about 200 km away from Chicago, though I think my co-ordinater meant UIC because he said it was in the Chicago down town, so no shortcuts through the paddocks lol icon_wink.gif

    Thank you very much for everyone else's responses much appriciated icon_smile.gif
  • WrestlerBoy

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    Aug 22, 2013 2:35 PM GMT
    That's really interesting. If you're doing law, then you definitely need to be looking at Yale, Harvard, and the University OF Chicago, but certainly not Champaign or Univ of Illinois AT Chicago; that's a real hole.

    Yale also has a great architecture program, as you know, so with that combination you might want to consider "suffering" in New Haven (GREAT pizza though!!!) after all.
  • Destinharbor

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    Aug 22, 2013 2:42 PM GMT
    Harvard has a great Urban Planning department at the grad school level. And look at Dartmouth (my school). They have a fairly unique system that allows you to design your own major and extend your time abroad to study in some great cities.
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    Aug 22, 2013 3:10 PM GMT
    WrestlerBoy saidThat's really interesting. If you're doing law, then you definitely need to be looking at Yale, Harvard, and the University OF Chicago, but certainly not Champaign or Univ of Illinois AT Chicago; that's a real hole.

    Yale also has a great architecture program, as you know, so with that combination you might want to consider "suffering" in New Haven (GREAT pizza though!!!) after all.


    Lol its clear you don't like UIC/UIUC point taken ha ha, though my family rather me to go to Denmark, but I'm stubborn and am pretty set on the states, maybe I just want to be like Harry Potter in a nice old college library lol.

    I'll suss out Yale but I believe I'm more into planning atm, but at the same time land rights for communities that cant defend themselves is what attracted me to law. I love pizza but I'm dairy and gluten intolerant, and I know the states especially in less dense areas is not so pro-active on GF foods, and is expensive icon_sad.gif

    DestinHarborHarvard has a great Urban Planning department at the grad school level. And look at Dartmouth (my school). They have a fairly unique system that allows you to design your own major and extend your time abroad to study in some great cities.


    That's pretty cool I'm more into flexibility with programs where they try different methods, but then again sometimes a solid program structure i.e. Harvard is beneficial too,you will have to give me some advice on how to contact Dartmouth if possible, cheers
  • Destinharbor

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    Aug 22, 2013 3:21 PM GMT
    Heynice2meetya said
    WrestlerBoy saidThat's really interesting. If you're doing law, then you definitely need to be looking at Yale, Harvard, and the University OF Chicago, but certainly not Champaign or Univ of Illinois AT Chicago; that's a real hole.

    Yale also has a great architecture program, as you know, so with that combination you might want to consider "suffering" in New Haven (GREAT pizza though!!!) after all.


    Lol its clear you don't like UIC/UIUC point taken ha ha, though my family rather me to go to Denmark, but I'm stubborn and am pretty set on the states, maybe I just want to be like Harry Potter in a nice old college library lol.

    I'll suss out Yale but I believe I'm more into planning atm, but at the same time land rights for communities that cant defend themselves is what attracted me to law. I love pizza but I'm dairy and gluten intolerant, and I know the states especially in less dense areas is not so pro-active on GF foods, and is expensive icon_sad.gif

    DestinHarborHarvard has a great Urban Planning department at the grad school level. And look at Dartmouth (my school). They have a fairly unique system that allows you to design your own major and extend your time abroad to study in some great cities.


    That's pretty cool I'm more into flexibility with programs where they try different methods, but then again sometimes a solid program structure i.e. Harvard is beneficial too,you will have to give me some advice on how to contact Dartmouth if possible, cheers


    Just go to Dartmouth.edu, then Admissions. Since both Urban Planning and Law are grad school items, I really liked Dartmouth because it's focus is on undergraduate education, and the profs do the teaching, not grad students. And the college owns about a third of the state of New Hampshire and has its own ski-way. Some promote an urban environment as rich for cultural opportunities but I think undergrad years should be for thinking and learning in an environment of beauty. You'll spend the rest of your life in a city.
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    Aug 25, 2013 3:56 AM GMT
    DestinHarborJust go to Dartmouth.edu, then Admissions. Since both Urban Planning and Law are grad school items, I really liked Dartmouth because it's focus is on undergraduate education, and the profs do the teaching, not grad students. And the college owns about a third of the state of New Hampshire and has its own ski-way. Some promote an urban environment as rich for cultural opportunities but I think undergrad years should be for thinking and learning in an environment of beauty. You'll spend the rest of your life in a city.


    I looked at the site and I couldn't actually find a planning program at Dartmouth? Maybe it's a combined degree under a different name? But true on the surroundings I find it more inspiring to learn in a quiet natural environment then the city, and ski-way sounds awesome icon_smile.gif