HIV/AIDS Cure

  • MotorBrett

    Posts: 145

    Nov 17, 2008 9:05 AM GMT
    If anyone hasn't heard about the man in Germany who had the bone marrow transplant who had AIDS:

    Effectively his doctors did a match with a donor that was CCR5 gene deficient, which makes those individuals immune to HIV.

    After the transplant he has been testing HIV NEGATIVE for two years now.

    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1858843,00.html

    This is a big deal, but bone marrow transplants are risky due to graft-versus-host disease which may prove fatal.

    I think there is a reliably safe way around this. If anyone on RJ does (or knows someone doing) advanced research in cellular manipulation (recombinant dna) please contact me. It would be greatly appreciated.

    I'd love to discuss this and view it as a potentially enormous breakthrough.

    Thanks,
    Brett =)
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Nov 17, 2008 12:29 PM GMT
    Hello, I actually work with bone marrow transplant patients. The idea behind what they did of course was search for a donor with a particular type of cell marker that has shown resistance to HIV. Killed off the patients bone marrow with some rather harsh chemicals, and replace it with his. None of the articles discusses how his Graft vs. host disease is progressing, but I can tell you if it gets out of control, it's not pretty. Most transplant patients live about five to six years tops and it's one thing after another from infections to GVH complications. The promise for this however is that the donors cells have so far, made the patient HIV negative. It shows that a particular type of cell can be used to fight HIV. There is another project going on that is similar and closer to being used in humans. Basically they took a T-cell that has been shown to resist HIV, genetically strengthened it so now it even recognizes variants of HIV. They are starting to test it in mice that have been altered to produce human cells. The hope is of course a cure, but they want to make sure it doesn't attack other parts of the body as well.
  • MotorBrett

    Posts: 145

    Nov 17, 2008 5:11 PM GMT
    Do you know what they are doing in terms of HLA matching? Or do you have the link to this study by any chance?
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    Nov 17, 2008 5:21 PM GMT
    There's also a very promising study underway at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. The researchers believe they have found the virus' achilles heel, a genetic marker that remains constant (i.e., does not mutate). If this proves out, it could be a much less invasive procedure than something like bone marrow transplantation.

    Houston doctors say they may have found a way to destroy HIV

    http://www.kvue.com/news/state/stories/072908kvuehivbreakthrough-cb.14e217f8.html

    http://publicaffairs.uth.tmc.edu/media/newsreleases/nr2008/hiv.htm
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    Nov 17, 2008 5:35 PM GMT
    if you read the articles they say this is not an effective treatment and will not bear out to the general population. the person first has to be a match for the bone marrow and then the donor has to be one of the few that are considered immune to most strains of hiv, which is a 1 in 1000 chance in europeans. The only thing this does is show us that gene therapy might be the path to follow
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    Nov 17, 2008 5:38 PM GMT
    An interesting article but not practical for the millions that have HIV. Transplants of any sort are risky and very invasive. I will stick with drug treatment of my HIV thanks.
  • MotorBrett

    Posts: 145

    Nov 18, 2008 3:12 AM GMT
    chungo44 saidif you read the articles they say this is not an effective treatment and will not bear out to the general population. the person first has to be a match for the bone marrow and then the donor has to be one of the few that are considered immune to most strains of hiv, which is a 1 in 1000 chance in europeans. The only thing this does is show us that gene therapy might be the path to follow


    yeah, i've got a theoretical way around issues of donor matches. and large-scale preventative and cure treatment.

    ie - retroactive vaccination.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Nov 19, 2008 3:18 AM GMT
    Here is some information I talked about earlier.

    http://www.physorg.com/news145458050.html
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    Nov 27, 2008 8:38 AM GMT

    In the recent article on early HIV treatment - at what point does the cd4t
    cell count indicat HIV ( anything below 800 ? ) - at what point in this cell count is one infective to others ? skipskip
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    Nov 27, 2008 8:40 AM GMT
    skipskip said
    In the recent article on early HIV treatment - at what point does the cd4t
    cell count indicat e HIV ( anything below 800 ? ) - at what point in this cell count is one infective to others ? skipskip
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    Nov 27, 2008 8:42 AM GMT
    skipskip said
    skipskip said
    In the recent article on early HIV treatment - at what point does the cd4t
    cell count indicat e HIV ( anything below 800 ? ) - at what point in this cell count can one infecti others ? skipskip
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 27, 2008 8:42 AM GMT
    skipskip said
    skipskip said
    skipskip said
    In the recent article on early HIV treatment - at what point does the cd4t
    cell count indicat e HIV ( anything below 800 ? ) - at what point in this cell count can one infect others ? skipskip
  • MotorBrett

    Posts: 145

    Nov 27, 2008 10:52 AM GMT
    skipskip,

    When using Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy (HAART) to treat HIV, the CD4 T Cell count remains high and one is considered undectable when viral load is less than 5 copies per mL of blood.

    Comparatively, one is considered infectious when viral load is above 1700.

    And for all those people out there getting tested negative and fucking bareback, here's the kicker:

    During the first few weeks to months of acute HIV infection, when the Western Blot test will come back negative due to the "window period" of infection, there are around 100 MILLION VIRAL COPIES PER MILLILETER OF BLOOD.

    So before the body can attack HIV and develop antibodies, people are most infectious when they are testing negative by Western Blot.

    The only way around this is the expensive RNA PCR test, which can produce positive results several days after exposure.

    So please, USE CONDOMS until you are 100% sure you and your partner are negative.

    Brett ;)