So...who's done Crossfit?

  • BryUSC88

    Posts: 198

    Aug 25, 2013 2:17 PM GMT
    There is a new Crossfit gym opening near my workplace, and I was thinking about giving it a shot. I'm looking for something to shake things up a bit. We have a great gym at work, but I don't think I'm getting as much out of it as I should. When I'm working out alone, I tend to be a bit slack. I've heard that Crossfit is tough, but gives quick results (depending on diet, of course) as long as you stick with it...which is another problem I have. Anyway, just wanted to get some opinions. Thanks!
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    Aug 25, 2013 3:52 PM GMT
    I'll never do it and I think at your age and weight you should approach with caution.

    I've found that almost everyone who shares their experiences with P90X, Crossfit and other programs of that ilk online positively rhapsodize about them. Like a cult attracting like-minded people, it's great for those who prefer the camaraderie, support and pressure of training in a team environment.

    Light birdlike people that make exceptional runners would probably be the least likely to injure themselves performing Crossfit, P90X, Insanity and other calisthenic bootcamp bodyweight exercises. But it's a bad idea for people like me with knee and joint problems, and a terrible one for the morbidly obese - I literally cringe during "The Biggest Loser" when all those contestants do jumping lunges to exhaustion. I'll never be a convert to that type of high impact, high intensity training. I totally get why some people like it having recently experienced a runner's high sprinting HIIT on a flexdeck treadmill but within a week my knees and back started hurting and a long-healed torn foot ligament started acting up. I'll stick with weights, yoga and HIIT on an elliptical and in the pool only.
  • pelotudo87

    Posts: 225

    Aug 25, 2013 6:09 PM GMT
    I think Crossfit can be good and bad

    (disclaimer: I have never done Crossfit, so this is just my outside opinion):

    Positives:
    -You are more likely to push yourself and be consistent in a group atmosphere
    -Metabolic circuit training that involves full-body, free weight exercises with short rest intervals=a lot of fat loss

    Negatives:
    -A lot of the exercises are quite complex, so mastering them is critical. Not knowing how to do a deadlift + trying to do the maximum number of reps for time = one way ticket to "snap city"
    -It depends on what your goal is. If your goal is to have good overall fitness, Crossfit is better than a traditional weightlifting / bodybuilding workout; however, if your goal is to have the maximum amount of muscle mass and the minimum amount of fat in order to "sculpt" your physique, then Crossfit might not be the best option since it is not specifically physique-oriented----it's actually performance oriented.


    So, overall, I think that for someone who likes the group dynamic and wants to "get in shape," it can be good; however, make sure that the instructors are good and that you know what you are doing, or else you WILL get injuryed...also, if your goal is to build your physique, Crossfit will help you some, but not as much as doing a bodybuilding workout.

    My thoughts.
  • RaggedyMan

    Posts: 7185

    Aug 25, 2013 7:54 PM GMT
    I love it. I think you should give it a try and see for yourself. They usually offer free classes for newbies
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    Aug 25, 2013 9:00 PM GMT
    One thing to note is that anyone can open a crossfit gym and call themselves a crossfit instructor. So you really need to be a smart consumer and observe the gym. Like SJ said, most have intro classes/sessions that are free or lower cost. This is the time to take mental notes. Do they emphasize form and safety? Is the equipment and facilities in good condition? Is the staff certified in CPR and first aid? And so on.

  • BryUSC88

    Posts: 198

    Aug 25, 2013 9:47 PM GMT
    So, what I've learned from this thread so far is that I'm too old and fat, although I don't feel like I'm either. Crossfit is tough and can be dangerous unless you have a good instructor. And Crossfit can be cult-like. LOL

    The new gym's website does say they offer free intro classes, so I'll probably give it a try...at least once. They're not open yet though. Still under construction I guess.

    Any more opinions of Crossfit?
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    Aug 25, 2013 10:31 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidI'll never do it and I think at your age and weight you should approach with caution.

    I've found that almost everyone who shares their experiences with P90X, Crossfit and other programs of that ilk online positively rhapsodize about them. Like a cult attracting like-minded people, it's great for those who prefer the camaraderie, support and pressure of training in a team environment.

    Light birdlike people that make exceptional runners would probably be the least likely to injure themselves performing Crossfit, P90X, Insanity and other calisthenic bootcamp bodyweight exercises. But it's a bad idea for people like me with knee and joint problems, and a terrible one for the morbidly obese - I literally cringe during "The Biggest Loser" when all those contestants do jumping lunges to exhaustion. I'll never be a convert to that type of high impact, high intensity training. I totally get why some people like it having recently experienced a runner's high sprinting HIIT on a flexdeck treadmill but within a week my knees and back started hurting and a long-healed torn foot ligament started acting up. I'll stick with weights, yoga and HIIT on an elliptical and in the pool only.



    Sorry, but that's a load of bullshit. "At his age?" He's 48.....not 98. Maybe he should just go shoot himself, huh? icon_rolleyes.gif

    I'm older than the OP and I started in March of this year, and I'm in the best shape of my entire life now. I'm doing things that I couldn't even do as a kid. On many days I beat the pants off the 20 year olds too. Yeah, it's cult like and that's what makes it so much fun. That being said, it takes a particular type of personality to enjoy it. Fortunately, my personality is made for CrossFit. I was so bored with my regular gym.....everyone doing their stupid bicep curls in front of the dumbbell rack, staring in the mirror, afraid to make eye contact. Headphones stuck in everyone's ears, so forget about anything social taking place. I was feeling like I was working out in a library. CrossFit is the complete opposite. You'll never see anyone with headphones in their ears and this is the crazy part.....people will actually greet you when you walk in by your name!

    But before you go, do this: Go to http://map.crossfit.com/ and make sure the place you're going to is an affiliate and not just some random place ripping off the CrossFit name. Go to an introductory class and ask about their safety measures. Some boxes are more safety oriented than others (like any gym.)
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Aug 25, 2013 11:33 PM GMT
    It's almost 2 years old, but still a pretty good article. If I remember right, the overall opinion was negative, largely due to questions about the knowledge and training of the instructors. But check it out.

    http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/cult-crossfit
  • BryUSC88

    Posts: 198

    Aug 25, 2013 11:39 PM GMT
    Thanks for the map scruffy...the gym I'm looking at is on there...and they're not even open yet.
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    Aug 26, 2013 1:57 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    eagermuscle saidI'll never do it and I think at your age and weight you should approach with caution...
    Sorry, but that's a load of bullshit. "At his age?" He's 48.....not 98. Maybe he should just go shoot himself, huh? icon_rolleyes.gif

    BryUSC88 saidSo, what I've learned from this thread so far is that I'm too old and fat

    WRONG takeaway. Plus I'd have interpreted my opinion as a thoughtful answer demonstrating care for another's well-being, not an insult. I guess this proves no good deed goes unpunished, but since I'm a glutton for punishment I'll address these two responses.

    Re weight - you can be solid muscle and it can still be problematic. There's a reason you don't see a lot of lean heavyweight bodybuilders taking cardio classes - weight wears. When I'm a solid 185 I feel I can jump around like a flea compared to when I'm a solid 200. At 185 (for me) my knees, back and joints are fine. Over 190 yoga starts becoming problematic - keeping my thigh at a 90 degree angle to the floor doing "warrior" poses strains my knee more over that weight. Over 200 I'll only stick to the floor exercises because my balance is off and if I fall I'll land harder.

    Re age - wear and tear occurs over time no matter how good you look and how carefully you train. My neurologist, who I see for a cervical herniation I incurred while flexibility training, absolutely LOVES to remind me every time I see him that I have a 50 year old neck. (Yeah, thanks bitch.) A large percentage of his practice is weightlifters who injure themselves through a lifetime of wear and tear, and lithe runners who wind up needing knee replacements.

    "The Most Dangerous Crossfit Moves" - http://spryliving.com/articles/the-most-dangerous-crossfit-moves/

    "Crossfit injuries" - http://www.google.com/#fp=5681937abd98690f&q=crossfit+injuries
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    Aug 26, 2013 4:12 PM GMT
    A bud of mine has his own CROSS-FIT set up in his back yard. It's a short intense work out that uses a combination of free weights, hi intensity excersise and they even push old giant tires around. They also do swimming and fast sprints. He has a big group and a lot of females too who want to work off the ass.

    I loaned him my my gym set that gets a lot of use and I do Cross Fit also, but I love to hike my ass and bust my legs off that way.....

    DO IT...
    Check out this official INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/crossfit

    Get off the Couch, stop eating potato chips, KILL the TV and retire the sedentary lifestyle!!


  • BryUSC88

    Posts: 198

    Aug 27, 2013 12:18 AM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    Scruffypup said
    eagermuscle saidI'll never do it and I think at your age and weight you should approach with caution...
    Sorry, but that's a load of bullshit. "At his age?" He's 48.....not 98. Maybe he should just go shoot himself, huh? icon_rolleyes.gif

    BryUSC88 saidSo, what I've learned from this thread so far is that I'm too old and fat

    WRONG takeaway. Plus I'd have interpreted my opinion as a thoughtful answer demonstrating care for another's well-being, not an insult. I guess this proves no good deed goes unpunished, but since I'm a glutton for punishment I'll address these two responses.

    Re weight - you can be solid muscle and it can still be problematic. There's a reason you don't see a lot of lean heavyweight bodybuilders taking cardio classes - weight wears. When I'm a solid 185 I feel I can jump around like a flea compared to when I'm a solid 200. At 185 (for me) my knees, back and joints are fine. Over 190 yoga starts becoming problematic - keeping my thigh at a 90 degree angle to the floor doing "warrior" poses strains my knee more over that weight. Over 200 I'll only stick to the floor exercises because my balance is off and if I fall I'll land harder.

    Re age - wear and tear occurs over time no matter how good you look and how carefully you train. My neurologist, who I see for a cervical herniation I incurred while flexibility training, absolutely LOVES to remind me every time I see him that I have a 50 year old neck. (Yeah, thanks bitch.) A large percentage of his practice is weightlifters who injure themselves through a lifetime of wear and tear, and lithe runners who wind up needing knee replacements.

    "The Most Dangerous Crossfit Moves" - http://spryliving.com/articles/the-most-dangerous-crossfit-moves/

    "Crossfit injuries" - http://www.google.com/#fp=5681937abd98690f&q=crossfit+injuries


    Don't get me wrong eagermuscle...I do appreciate the opinion. That's why I asked the question on here...to get opinions. I will say I was surprised that the first opinion I got was saying my age and weight could be a problem. I guess I wasn't expecting that. But thanks for chiming in. The Crossfit gym I'm considering doesn't open until October...so I have some time to decide.
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    Aug 27, 2013 12:27 AM GMT
    BryUSC88 saidSo, what I've learned from this thread so far is that I'm too old and fat, although I don't feel like I'm either. Crossfit is tough and can be dangerous unless you have a good instructor. And Crossfit can be cult-like. LOL

    The new gym's website does say they offer free intro classes, so I'll probably give it a try...at least once. They're not open yet though. Still under construction I guess.

    Any more opinions of Crossfit?


    Let us know how it goes. We've been interested, and unlike some of the negatives, our sons, who both do CrossFit, say there are men our age who do it and we should give the beginner class a chance. Though we haven't, it's just circumstance. So maybe you'll be our inspiration. Great luck to you (even at "your age" icon_lol.gif ) and hope it works out for you (and us).
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    Aug 27, 2013 12:44 AM GMT
    BryUSC88 saidSo, what I've learned from this thread so far is that I'm too old and fat, although I don't feel like I'm either. Crossfit is tough and can be dangerous unless you have a good instructor. And Crossfit can be cult-like. LOL

    The new gym's website does say they offer free intro classes, so I'll probably give it a try...at least once. They're not open yet though. Still under construction I guess.

    Any more opinions of Crossfit?


    Too old?? Screw that. Listen to your own body and determine for yourself what you may be too old for. I started Crossfit last year at 50. I love it, it challenges me to my core, it pushes me to limits I would not reach myself. I keep a balance between Crossfit and my regular gym workout. I would def recommend you try it for yourself and throw yourself into it with all you have. Expect to be humbled and deeply personally challenged, then savor the feeling of accomplishment as you walk out to your car at the end.
    Good luck with it...and you're not too old.

    Peace
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    Aug 27, 2013 12:50 AM GMT
    I'm all about TRX suspension training and WOD (workout of the day)...totally addicted and live almost religiously by it
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    Aug 27, 2013 1:04 AM GMT
    sanjose408 saidI love it. I think you should give it a try and see for yourself. They usually offer free classes for newbies


    and join the cult...lol
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    Aug 27, 2013 3:17 AM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    Scruffypup said
    eagermuscle saidI'll never do it and I think at your age and weight you should approach with caution...
    Sorry, but that's a load of bullshit. "At his age?" He's 48.....not 98. Maybe he should just go shoot himself, huh? icon_rolleyes.gif

    BryUSC88 saidSo, what I've learned from this thread so far is that I'm too old and fat

    WRONG takeaway. Plus I'd have interpreted my opinion as a thoughtful answer demonstrating care for another's well-being, not an insult. I guess this proves no good deed goes unpunished, but since I'm a glutton for punishment I'll address these two responses.

    Re weight - you can be solid muscle and it can still be problematic. There's a reason you don't see a lot of lean heavyweight bodybuilders taking cardio classes - weight wears. When I'm a solid 185 I feel I can jump around like a flea compared to when I'm a solid 200. At 185 (for me) my knees, back and joints are fine. Over 190 yoga starts becoming problematic - keeping my thigh at a 90 degree angle to the floor doing "warrior" poses strains my knee more over that weight. Over 200 I'll only stick to the floor exercises because my balance is off and if I fall I'll land harder.

    Re age - wear and tear occurs over time no matter how good you look and how carefully you train. My neurologist, who I see for a cervical herniation I incurred while flexibility training, absolutely LOVES to remind me every time I see him that I have a 50 year old neck. (Yeah, thanks bitch.) A large percentage of his practice is weightlifters who injure themselves through a lifetime of wear and tear, and lithe runners who wind up needing knee replacements.

    "The Most Dangerous Crossfit Moves" - http://spryliving.com/articles/the-most-dangerous-crossfit-moves/

    "Crossfit injuries" - http://www.google.com/#fp=5681937abd98690f&q=crossfit+injuries


    Why does no one ever post the dangerous shit people do in regular gyms? I think people pick on CrossFit because they don't have the guts to do it, so they put it down and make it sound dangerous. Newsflash: ALL exercise is potentially dangerous! I used to be a personal trainer and I can tell you that I've seen WAY more hazardous lifting techniques in my regular gym than I have in CrossFit. The coaches at CrossFit are always on your ass about form. Form form form form and more form. They beat it into you. Before each and every workout, we're lectured about form....not only lectured about it, but actual physical demonstrations, even though most of us know these exercises like the back of our hand. My coach knows I have back issues, so I'm given alternative exercises to do when they think it might be too intense for my disc issue. I'm so sick of people knocking something they've never even tried.
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    Aug 27, 2013 3:43 AM GMT
    Op I think crossfit is unsafe. Some of the exercises that represent crossfit are awful for the body.

    It sounds like you need to be pushed to your limit but there's a safe way to do that.
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    Aug 27, 2013 3:44 AM GMT
    Depending on the cost, you might be better off hiring a personal trainer. A lot of trainers are familiar with crossfit-style lifts and workouts, plus you'd be getting a completely customized plan and someone watching only you to make sure you're doing things safely and effectively. I'm a little biased because I am a trainer myself and I see mine 3x per week, but my physique didn't start transforming until I hired him and I know my clients get results because I'm fully invested in their success.

    OTOH, I know a lot of people who love it and who thrive in the group atmosphere. If that sounds like you, go for it.
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    Aug 27, 2013 4:09 AM GMT
    SF79 saidDepending on the cost, you might be better off hiring a personal trainer. A lot of trainers are familiar with crossfit-style lifts and workouts, plus you'd be getting a completely customized plan and someone watching only you to make sure you're doing things safely and effectively. I'm a little biased because I am a trainer myself and I see mine 3x per week, but my physique didn't start transforming until I hired him and I know my clients get results because I'm fully invested in their success.

    OTOH, I know a lot of people who love it and who thrive in the group atmosphere. If that sounds like you, go for it.


    I agree a great personal trainer can kick his ass in a safer way
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    Aug 27, 2013 4:52 AM GMT
    eagermuscle said...A large percentage of [my neurologist's] practice is weightlifters who injure themselves through a lifetime of wear and tear, and lithe runners who wind up needing knee replacements.

    Scruffypup saidWhy does no one ever post the dangerous shit people do in regular gyms?...Newsflash: ALL exercise is potentially dangerous!

    My point is that given the innate nature of Crossfit - speedy, high intensity load bearing cardiac compound movements where you're competing not just against yourself but are influenced to keep up with others with whom you interact who can quite easily distract you - a lot more bad things can happen if you lose focus for even a moment. This can happen under the watchful eye of even the best trainers in the best studios. If I can get a cervical herniation from a golf swing, and aggravate it despite proper form and the best of intentions during a class at a yoga studio, imagine what can happen with an enthusiastic Crossfit newbie. I'm not telling anyone NOT to do Crossfit, just that they proceed with more caution than they would with most other programs if they're not young, marginally overweight or unathletic, and that personally I'd never do it. If I did, I'd go the safest Crossfit route with a one-on-one personal trainer as SF79 suggested even though that might not be as interesting and motivating as a class.