Anyone had a heel spur/bone spur?

  • BryUSC88

    Posts: 198

    Aug 25, 2013 10:17 PM GMT
    I think I have a heel spur. It started about 2 weeks ago, and it's a sharp pain in my left heel. It comes and goes, but strangely enough, after I walk or run on it a few minutes, it feels better. But sometimes when I first get out of bed, I can barely walk. I've googled it, but wanted to get some opinions on here.

  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Aug 26, 2013 2:31 AM GMT
    Podiatrist time. However, before you do anything about it get several opinions. It can be a tricky surgery and not at all easy recuperation. I amy hae read somewhere that they are using ultrasound on them, but I am not sure.
  • brickboy1966

    Posts: 359

    Aug 26, 2013 11:33 AM GMT
    Yeah that sounds really familiar. I had one till I left my job in 2010. Haven't had a problem with since. Someone told me it was because I walked on concrete all day.
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    Aug 26, 2013 12:19 PM GMT
    Are you sure it's not plantar fasciitis?
    It usually presents as a heel pain, similar to a stone bruise.




    http://www.plantar-fasciitis.org/
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    Aug 26, 2013 8:29 PM GMT
    If it's plantar fasciitis the night splint thing you wear helped me a lot. I was working at a desk and would put it on at work and then at home whenever I was sitting around, and at night when I slept.
  • joedocker

    Posts: 47

    Aug 27, 2013 4:29 AM GMT
    A heel spur should hurt more the more you use it - arthritis from degenerative changes will often lead to pain that improves with use as you loosen up - het a medically trained doctor or trainer to examine you and find out what's going on it makes a big difference in treatment options
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    Sep 12, 2013 11:48 PM GMT
    Sounds like plantar fasciitis, PF, (more correctly an -osis than an -itis). Osteoarthritis does not tend to produce sharp pain, unless it's pretty severe.

    Osteophytic changes/heel spurs are not the primary cause of pain the pain, contrary to popular belief and out-dated knowledge that may be held by some physicians. Osteophytes form due to increased stress on bone, and in many cases this stress is caused by tension on the bone from the pull of a muscle/tendon or tension from ligaments. So, you'll often find heel spurs along with PF.

    See your physician, or a PT, for an evaluation.

    More info, if you're interested:
    Fairly simple and short article. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3687890/
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    Sep 22, 2013 1:58 PM GMT
    Of course the first thing is to find out what is going on, but what then? I struggled with plantar fasciitis for two years (was not a surgical candidate due to another problem; orthotics, cort. shots, a "boot", ESWT, medication and PT did not help). Strange as it seems, and I did it as a last resort, dry needling and graston technique worked miracles. (In weeks, I went from not being able to walk to the car without a cane, to hiking up to 3 miles.) Not many American docs are familiar with these procedures and many that are pooh-pooh them. The first double blind study on dry needling is going to be published from La Trobe University in Australia showing it is as effective as other treatments. - the effect size was 0.49 which is similar to other treatments for plantar heel pain including orthotics, cortisone, stretching and taping. The key is not to let it get chronic; if it does, the inflammation is harder to get rid of. (I have now used dry needling and graston for shoulder pain, lower back pain and arm pain - it is amazing.)
  • LeanBuilt

    Posts: 26

    Dec 15, 2015 12:29 AM GMT
    You wrote "I think I have a heel spur. It started about 2 weeks ago, and it's a sharp pain in my left heel. It comes and goes, but strangely enough, after I walk or run on it a few minutes, it feels better. But sometimes when I first get out of bed, I can barely walk. I've googled it, but wanted to get some opinions on here."

    It is more likely, as mentioned, that the fascia on the underside of your foot that connects to the heel bone on the side closer to the toes has gotten inflamed at the insertion point to the heel bone.

    At night as you sleep you point your toes, which relaxes the fascia all night, and then when you first step, it has to reach its full length again and minor tears occur on your first steps, which causes pain, until it relaxes a little bit.

    If you leave this untreated I have seen on Youtube that you may get a bone spur, as fascia can't stretch much, but your body can grow bone, and the body will grow a bone spur to relieve the pressure on the fascia.

    My Suggestion to help would be to never walk barefoot on hard surfaces. So use flip flops at home and in the gym wet areas, and keep them near the bed so you slip into them right away on waking. Never walk barefoot on tile or concrete.

    Going to a physiotherapist who is trained in feet is also a good idea as they can see if there is a mechanical imbalance in how you walk. They can put your feet on a kind of 3D scanner and have orthotic inserts made for your main shoes to correct the imbalance. These typically have a spongy hole under the bone spur area, You can start by buying drug store orthotics, but if you have coverage, custom orthotics may be better.

    Foot exercises like rolling your foot on a baseball will help, along with loosening the muscles of the calf that connect under around your heel.

    Your physio can get you a special sock which pulls your toes up at night and connects to a tight band below your knee just above your big calf muscle. There are also shoes that prevent your feet from pointing, as mentioned above.

    If you google plantar fasciitis on Youtube you will find lots of stuff. It takes a while to go away, but you kinda need your feet, so worth the effort.