Earth-size 'lava planet' with 8.5-hour year among fastest ever seen

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    Aug 27, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    That's a lot of birthdays for the average person!

    Astronomers have discovered a hot Earth-size planet so close to its star that a year on that exoplanet lasts just 8.5 hours, making it one of the fastest alien planets ever seen.

    The small orbital period -- one of the shortest ever discovered for an alien planet among the worlds discovered by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope -- means the planet is far outside what is considered the habitable zone of its star, where liquid water, and maybe life, could exist. In fact, scientists have described the new world as a so-called "lava planet."




    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57600138/earth-size-lava-planet-with-8.5-hour-year-among-fastest-ever-seen/
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    Aug 27, 2013 5:14 AM GMT
    Holy hell. That would be a crazy planet to tan on.
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    Aug 28, 2013 12:34 AM GMT
    SSSurfer saidHoly hell. That would be a crazy planet to tan on.


    But you would age very fast.
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    Aug 28, 2013 12:55 AM GMT
    SSSurfer saidHoly hell. That would be a crazy planet to tan on.

    hell is the right term
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    Aug 28, 2013 1:16 AM GMT
    so which is longer....a day or a year on the "lava-planet"?icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 28, 2013 4:02 AM GMT
    GoNYMets2012 saidThat's a lot of birthdays for the average person!

    Astronomers have discovered a hot Earth-size planet so close to its star that a year on that exoplanet lasts just 8.5 hours, making it one of the fastest alien planets ever seen.

    The small orbital period -- one of the shortest ever discovered for an alien planet among the worlds discovered by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope -- means the planet is far outside what is considered the habitable zone of its star


    I think they mean FAR INSIDE the habitable zone. Not that I'm a know-it-all, but I at least understand this statement is wrong, even though my only credentials are an engineering background and a one-time Astronomy class in college.

    An 8.5 hr orbit means it's REALLY close to the sun. The habitable zone depends on the star size because it basically depends on how much energy is given to a planet. You don't want too much or too little. In this case, it's too much.

    If it were far outside of the habitable zone, it'd be like Pluto: cold and desolate.

    Lava is quite the opposite.