Who Knew? Democrats Led The Passage of the Civil Rights Act

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    Aug 30, 2013 7:07 PM GMT
    This is interesting. I was under the impression that Republicans led the way on Civil Rights in the 60s. It's a good thing we have the L.A. Times to make such important revisions to history:

    Since Democrats led the passage of civil rights legislation that marchers pushed for in 1963, Republicans have struggled to recover with black voters, leaving a stark racial divide in American politics.


    http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-obama-march-20130829,0,488441.story
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    Aug 30, 2013 7:39 PM GMT
    Perhaps you're confused because Lincoln was a Republican.
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    Aug 30, 2013 10:02 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidPerhaps you're confused because Lincoln was a Republican.


    What are you talking about? This is referring to the 1960s, not the 1860s.
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    Aug 31, 2013 5:02 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidPerhaps you're confused because Lincoln was a Republican.


    Perhaps your confused about the Civil Rights Act/s because Orval Faubus, George Wallace, Lester Maddox, Robert Byrd, J william Fulbright, Albert Gore SR., Sam Ervine, Richard Russell, Lyndon B. Johnson were all Democrats.


    “is a farce and a sham–an effort to set up a police state in the guise of liberty. I am opposed to that program. I have voted against the so-called poll tax repeal bill. . .. I have voted against the so-called anti-lynching bill.”
    Lyndon B. Johnson (D., Texas), 1948 by then Senator Johnson about President Truman's Civil Rights Program.



    “I am a former Kleagle [recruiter] of the Ku Klux Klan in Raleigh County. . . . The Klan is needed today as never before and I am anxious to see its rebirth here in West Virginia. It is necessary that the order be promoted immediately and in every state in the union.”
    Robert C. Byrd , 1946, Democrat Senator from West Virginia

    “Mr. President, the crime of lynching . . . is not of sufficient importance to justify this legislation.”
    Sen. Claude Pepper (D., Fla.), Spoken as part of a six-hour speach aginst the antilynching bill.






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    Aug 31, 2013 5:30 PM GMT
    HereAndThere said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidPerhaps you're confused because Lincoln was a Republican.


    What are you talking about? This is referring to the 1960s, not the 1860s.


    1960s, 1860s or the 1760s, doesn't matter, Democrats have always engaged in the politics of racism and stood in the way of civil rights.

    “are inferior to the whites in the endowments of both of body and mind.”

    Thomas Jefferson Co-founder of the Democratic party on the subject of "Blacks".

    “I hold that the present state of civilization, where two races of different origin, and distinguished by color, and other physical differences, as well as intellectual, are brought together, the relation now existing in the slaveholding states between the two, is, instead of an evil, a good–a positive good.”

    Sen. John C. Calhon (D., S.C.), Vice President, 1825-1832

    “Resolved, That the Democratic Party will resist all attempts at renewing, in Congress or out of it, the agitation of the slavery question, under whatever shape or color the attempt may be made.”

    Democratic Party platform, 1852

    “Resolved, That claiming fellowship with, and desiring the co-operation of all who regard the preservation of the Union under the Constitution as the paramount issue–and repudiating all sectional parties and platforms concerning domestic slavery, which seek to embroil the States and incite to treason and armed resistance to law in the Territories; and whose avowed purposes, if consummated, must end in civil war and disunion, the American Democracy recognize and adopt the principles contained in the organic laws establishing the Territories of Kansas and Nebraska as embodying the only sound and safe solution of the ‘slavery question’ upon which the great national idea of the people of this whole country can repose in its determined conservatism of the Union–NON-INTERFERENCE BY CONGRESS WITH SLAVERY IN STATE AND TERRITORY, OR IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA”.

    Democratic Party platform 1856


    “Resolved, That the enactments of the State Legislatures to defeat the faithful execution of the Fugitive Slave Law, are hostile in character, subversive of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their effect.”
    Democratic Party platform 1860

    “Instead of restoring the Union, it [the Republican Party] has, so far as in its power, dissolved it, and subjected ten states, in time of profound peace, to military despotism and Negro supremacy.”
    Democratic Party Platform 1868

    “These Negroes, they’re getting pretty uppity these days and that’s a problem for us since they’ve got something now they never had before, the political pull to back up their uppityness. Now we’ve got to do something about this, we’ve got to give them a little something, just enough to quiet them down, not enough to make a difference. For if we don’t move at all, then their allies will line up against us and there’ll be no way of stopping them, we’ll lose the filibuster and there’ll be no way of putting a brake on all sorts of wild legislation. It’ll be Reconstruction all over again.”
    Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson (D., Texas) 1957

    “I did not lie awake at night worrying about the problems of Negroes.”
    Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, 1961








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    Aug 31, 2013 7:45 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]HereAndThere said[/cite]This is interesting. I was under the impression that Republicans led the way on Civil Rights in the 60s. "

    1860s.

    As in 150 years ago
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    Aug 31, 2013 7:48 PM GMT
    SteveFla9 said[quote][cite]HereAndThere said[/cite]This is interesting. I was under the impression that Republicans led the way on Civil Rights in the 60s. "

    1860s.

    As in 150 years ago


    Yes, I think anyone who is competent in basic arithmetic is aware that the 1860s were around 150 years ago. What does your mathematical revelation have to do with the topic, which is about the Civil Rights Act in the 1960s?
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    Aug 31, 2013 8:07 PM GMT
    Lyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.
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    Aug 31, 2013 8:18 PM GMT
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Please directly respond to this fabrication by the LA Times:

    Democrats led the passage of civil rights legislation that marchers pushed for in 1963.

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    Aug 31, 2013 8:29 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]HereAndThere said[/cite]This is interesting. I was under the impression that Republicans led the way on Civil Rights in the 60s."

    Which Republicans are you thinking of?

    Barry Goldwater, the 1964 Republican candidate for president, was as hardcore racist as his fellow Republican Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.

    1964 was the turning point from the era of Eisenhower moderation. In 1964 Republicans decided that to be the opposite of the Democrats they had to oppose Civil Rights as well.

    Republicans were not naturally racists, obviously.
    But they were eager to win again, by any means necessary.
    They chose to appeal to racism and they marketed racial distrust and separation.
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    Aug 31, 2013 8:34 PM GMT
    By 1968 the Nixon campaign fully employed what they called "The Southern Strategy" .

    This didn't make Nixon's team racists. It just made them cynics who would use racism to their political advantage.
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    Aug 31, 2013 9:13 PM GMT
    HereAndThere said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Please directly respond to this fabrication by the LA Times:

    Democrats led the passage of civil rights legislation that marchers pushed for in 1963.



    It's not a fabrication, Lyndon Johnson helped make the push, despite the fact that would damage Democratic standing in the South and he was backed by other Democrats. In 1964, Barry Goldwater ran on an anti-civil rights platform and got crushed everywhere, but the south.

    That said, going by region, more Northern Republicans voted no than Northern Democrats did. And how many Southern Republicans voted Yes? Zero, whereas some Southern Democrats voted yes.
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    Aug 31, 2013 10:08 PM GMT
    blkapollo said
    HereAndThere said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Please directly respond to this fabrication by the LA Times:

    Democrats led the passage of civil rights legislation that marchers pushed for in 1963.



    It's not a fabrication, Lyndon Johnson helped make the push, despite the fact that would damage Democratic standing in the South and he was backed by other Democrats. In 1964, Barry Goldwater ran on an anti-civil rights platform and go crushed everywhere, but the south.

    That said, going by region, more Northern Republicans voted no than Northern Democrats did. And how many Southern Republicans voted Yes? Zero, whereas some Southern Democrats voted yes.



    Democrats led the passage of civil rights legislation that marchers pushed for in 1963.

    OK. We'll just leave history rewritten then.

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    Aug 31, 2013 10:44 PM GMT
    For the young Republicans who may not know their US history:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Democrats
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    Aug 31, 2013 11:12 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidFor the young Republicans who may not know their US history:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Democrats



    Good idea:

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2010/may/25/michael-steele/steele-says-gop-fought-hard-civil-rights-bills-196/

    The Civil Rights Act -- which is best known for barring discrimination in public accommodations -- passed the House on Feb. 10, 1964 by a margin of 290-130. When broken down by party, 61 percent of Democratic lawmakers voted for the bill (152 yeas and 96 nays), and a full 80 percent of the Republican caucus supported it (138 yeas and 34 nays).


    When the Senate passed the measure on June 19, 1964, -- nine days after supporters mustered enough votes to end the longest filibuster in Senate history -- the margin was 73-27. Better than two-thirds of Senate Democrats supported the measure on final passage (46 yeas, 21 nays), but an even stronger 82 percent of Republicans supported it (27 yeas, 6 nays).
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    Aug 31, 2013 11:20 PM GMT
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.
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    Aug 31, 2013 11:22 PM GMT
    HereAndThere said
    Lumpyoatmeal saidFor the young Republicans who may not know their US history:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Democrats



    Good idea:

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2010/may/25/michael-steele/steele-says-gop-fought-hard-civil-rights-bills-196/

    The Civil Rights Act -- which is best known for barring discrimination in public accommodations -- passed the House on Feb. 10, 1964 by a margin of 290-130. When broken down by party, 61 percent of Democratic lawmakers voted for the bill (152 yeas and 96 nays), and a full 80 percent of the Republican caucus supported it (138 yeas and 34 nays).


    When the Senate passed the measure on June 19, 1964, -- nine days after supporters mustered enough votes to end the longest filibuster in Senate history -- the margin was 73-27. Better than two-thirds of Senate Democrats supported the measure on final passage (46 yeas, 21 nays), but an even stronger 82 percent of Republicans supported it (27 yeas, 6 nays).


    Kewl. I'm on the droid so I didn't see that you already did it for him.
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    Aug 31, 2013 11:42 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.


    And look at the numbers, it's all regional and more southern Democrats voted for it than southern Republicans, which basically is all that needs to be said. Those northern Republicans that voted Yes were run out of the party years ago, they'd be closer to being independents or Democrats now.

    The only thing that is really worth looking at is regionalism and Southern Republicans in Congress were more anti-civil rights than Southern Democrats.
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    Aug 31, 2013 11:49 PM GMT
    blkapollo said
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.


    And look at the numbers, it's all regional and more southern Democrats voted for it than southern Republicans, which basically is all that needs to be said. Those northern Republicans that voted Yes were run out of the party years ago, they'd be closer to being independents or Democrats now.

    The only thing that is really worth looking at is regionalism and Southern Republicans in Congress were more anti-civil rights than Southern Democrats.



    Spin spin spin. "The only thing that is really worth looking at..."

    How about we let everyone else make up their mind. By writing that, I know full well that most will spin it the way you are, but after all, this is a gay site and that's what gays do. ;-)
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    Sep 01, 2013 12:11 AM GMT
    HereAndThere said
    blkapollo said
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.


    And look at the numbers, it's all regional and more southern Democrats voted for it than southern Republicans, which basically is all that needs to be said. Those northern Republicans that voted Yes were run out of the party years ago, they'd be closer to being independents or Democrats now.

    The only thing that is really worth looking at is regionalism and Southern Republicans in Congress were more anti-civil rights than Southern Democrats.



    Spin spin spin. "The only thing that is really worth looking at..."

    How about we let everyone else make up their mind. By writing that, I know full well that most will spin it the way you are, but after all, this is a gay site and that's what gays do. ;-)


    And conservatives love the word "spin" when they can't refute truth. The southern Republicans that voted no are more representative of the current GOP, that's a fact.
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    Sep 01, 2013 12:18 AM GMT
    blkapollo said
    HereAndThere said
    blkapollo said
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.


    And look at the numbers, it's all regional and more southern Democrats voted for it than southern Republicans, which basically is all that needs to be said. Those northern Republicans that voted Yes were run out of the party years ago, they'd be closer to being independents or Democrats now.

    The only thing that is really worth looking at is regionalism and Southern Republicans in Congress were more anti-civil rights than Southern Democrats.



    Spin spin spin. "The only thing that is really worth looking at..."

    How about we let everyone else make up their mind. By writing that, I know full well that most will spin it the way you are, but after all, this is a gay site and that's what gays do. ;-)


    And conservatives love the word "spin" when they can't refute truth. The southern Republicans that voted no are more representative of the current GOP, that's a fact.


    Truth you say? Well, the truth, back by numbers, is that MOST Republicans voted for it, not "some"
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    Sep 01, 2013 12:24 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo said
    HereAndThere said
    blkapollo said
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.


    And look at the numbers, it's all regional and more southern Democrats voted for it than southern Republicans, which basically is all that needs to be said. Those northern Republicans that voted Yes were run out of the party years ago, they'd be closer to being independents or Democrats now.

    The only thing that is really worth looking at is regionalism and Southern Republicans in Congress were more anti-civil rights than Southern Democrats.



    Spin spin spin. "The only thing that is really worth looking at..."

    How about we let everyone else make up their mind. By writing that, I know full well that most will spin it the way you are, but after all, this is a gay site and that's what gays do. ;-)


    And conservatives love the word "spin" when they can't refute truth. The southern Republicans that voted no are more representative of the current GOP, that's a fact.


    Truth you say? Well, the truth, back by numbers, is that MOST Republicans voted for it, not "some"


    But those Republicans wouldn't even be Republicans today, they would have been defeated in primaries for being "too politically correct". You're talking about a different era, that Republican Party is dead.

    That aside, you can't claim that Republicans were the only ones responsible for passing the Civil Rights Act.
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    Sep 01, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
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    Sep 01, 2013 7:24 AM GMT
    blkapollo said
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo said
    HereAndThere said
    blkapollo said
    freedomisntfree said
    blkapollo saidLyndon Johnson was a Democrat, not a Republican and the Civil Rights Act would have never become law had he not signed it. The divide was southern vs. northern, not Republican vs. Democrat, as the few southern Republicans that were around then voted against the Act. And the many of the Democrats that voted no later became Republicans or were otherwise very conservative. Stop ignoring the fact that the Southern Strategy permanently restructured the Republican Party.

    Some Republicans may have voted for the Civil Rights Act, but they didn't lead the fight.


    Some? Do yourself a favour .... tell me percentage of Republicans in the senate and the house who voted for it versus the Democrats.


    And look at the numbers, it's all regional and more southern Democrats voted for it than southern Republicans, which basically is all that needs to be said. Those northern Republicans that voted Yes were run out of the party years ago, they'd be closer to being independents or Democrats now.

    The only thing that is really worth looking at is regionalism and Southern Republicans in Congress were more anti-civil rights than Southern Democrats.



    Spin spin spin. "The only thing that is really worth looking at..."

    How about we let everyone else make up their mind. By writing that, I know full well that most will spin it the way you are, but after all, this is a gay site and that's what gays do. ;-)


    And conservatives love the word "spin" when they can't refute truth. The southern Republicans that voted no are more representative of the current GOP, that's a fact.


    Truth you say? Well, the truth, back by numbers, is that MOST Republicans voted for it, not "some"


    But those Republicans wouldn't even be Republicans today, they would have been defeated in primaries for being "too politically correct". You're talking about a different era, that Republican Party is dead.

    That aside, you can't claim that Republicans were the only ones responsible for passing the Civil Rights Act.


    You SAID some Republicans votes for the Civil Rights Act and I said MOST Republican voted for it, and the numbers show?

    I never made any other claims, now did I?
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    Sep 01, 2013 4:57 PM GMT
    Republicans should claim pride in the passage of the Civil Rights Act. This will give them ownership and a continuing investment in the equality of opportunity that we all want to see.

    Ten years from now Republicans will look back and claim credit for marriage equality. We can laugh if we want to but most important of all, is that they finally got on the right side.