Technology misapplied - EU to require 70 MPH speed limiters

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    Sep 01, 2013 3:53 PM GMT
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/road-safety/10278702/EU-plans-to-fit-all-cars-with-speed-limiters.html

    Ridiculous

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    Sep 01, 2013 11:42 PM GMT
    The Germans won't like that!
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    Sep 02, 2013 12:09 AM GMT
    The US would never do that, because it would take away too much revenue from speeding tickets.
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    Sep 02, 2013 12:16 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidThe US would never do that, because it would take away too much revenue from speeding tickets.


    That's true. Sometimes I feel like I am personally funding the operations of Broward County!
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    Sep 02, 2013 12:32 AM GMT
    HereAndThere said
    paulflexes saidThe US would never do that, because it would take away too much revenue from speeding tickets.


    That's true. Sometimes I feel like I am personally funding the operations of Broward County!
    Try 13 tickets in under two years.

    Of course I won 9 of them; but the last four I lost cause the lawyers said I was too much of a repeat offender and the court wouldn't accept their pleas. icon_lol.gif
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    Sep 02, 2013 12:53 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    HereAndThere said
    paulflexes saidThe US would never do that, because it would take away too much revenue from speeding tickets.


    That's true. Sometimes I feel like I am personally funding the operations of Broward County!
    Try 13 tickets in under two years.

    Of course I won 9 of them; but the last four I lost cause the lawyers said I was too much of a repeat offender and the court wouldn't accept their pleas. icon_lol.gif


    Wow! icon_eek.gif
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    Sep 02, 2013 2:07 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    HereAndThere said
    paulflexes saidThe US would never do that, because it would take away too much revenue from speeding tickets.


    That's true. Sometimes I feel like I am personally funding the operations of Broward County!
    Try 13 tickets in under two years.

    Of course I won 9 of them; but the last four I lost cause the lawyers said I was too much of a repeat offender and the court wouldn't accept their pleas. icon_lol.gif


    I'd hate to say how many I had when the NMSL was in place.
  • kew1

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    Sep 02, 2013 9:19 AM GMT
    HereAndThere saidThe Germans won't like that!

    Manufacturers or drivers used to Autobahns without speed limits?
    btw, they aren't the only place in Europe where you can drive at whatever speed you want, the Isle of Man has no limits in a lot of the island, if you fancy pretending to be a TT racer, the roads are a bit narrow though,with stone walls.
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    Sep 02, 2013 4:58 PM GMT
    Just wait until the hacktivists get a hold of this.

    With all the radar, cameras and speed control...they'll have a field day using the cars to run over anybody they don't like. icon_twisted.gif
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    Sep 02, 2013 7:14 PM GMT
    Around 30,000 people die on the roads in Europe every year. (The figure is about the same for the US.) Now a lot of those deaths will not be attributable to speeding, but an awful lot of them will.

    If we had 30,000 aircraft-related or train-related deaths every year, could anyone sensibly argue that leaving things as they are was a viable option?

    We should at least be looking into the idea of smart speed regulating devices for new vehicles, instead of dismissing the idea out of hand. If it were not a good idea on road safety grounds, it would still be worthy of consideration on environmental and energy conservation grounds.
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    Sep 03, 2013 12:25 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidAround 30,000 people die on the roads in Europe every year. (The figure is about the same for the US.) Now a lot of those deaths will not be attributable to speeding, but an awful lot of them will.

    If we had 30,000 aircraft-related or train-related deaths every year, could anyone sensibly argue that leaving things as they are was a viable option?

    We should at least be looking into the idea of smart speed regulating devices for new vehicles, instead of dismissing the idea out of hand. If it were not a good idea on road safety grounds, it would still be worthy of consideration on environmental and energy conservation grounds.



    "In the US, recent stats show that 12.8% of all fatal traffic crashes were alcohol-related, and 40% of that number involved teens driving while drinking alcohol."

    From http://www.alcoholalert.com/alcohol-and-drunk-driving-articles.html



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    Sep 03, 2013 1:09 PM GMT
    Tangiers said

    "In the US, recent stats show that 12.8% of all fatal traffic crashes were alcohol-related, and 40% of that number involved teens driving while drinking alcohol."

    From http://www.alcoholalert.com/alcohol-and-drunk-driving-articles.html


    I did say not all road deaths are attributable to speeding, though, even within the statistics you quote, speeding whilst under the influence of alcohol and speeding by inexperienced drivers are bound to be significant factors.

    The case for speed-limiters is probably strongest among younger drivers and, as well as saving lives, might do something to reduce crippling insurance premiums among that group.
  • kew1

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    Sep 03, 2013 5:50 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said

    The case for speed-limiters is probably strongest among younger drivers and, as well as saving lives, might do something to reduce crippling insurance premiums among that group.


    It's cheaper & easier to reduce the insurance premiums with trackers . They know your speed , when & where.Then adjust your premium if found speeding.Some companies are already doing this (I think it's an app using the phone's gps).
    Retro-fitting hardware to put the brakes on (as suggested by the EU) would be much more complicated,if even possible.
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    Sep 03, 2013 6:34 PM GMT
    kew1 said
    Ex_Mil8 said

    The case for speed-limiters is probably strongest among younger drivers and, as well as saving lives, might do something to reduce crippling insurance premiums among that group.


    It's cheaper & easier to reduce the insurance premiums with trackers . They know your speed , when & where.Then adjust your premium if found speeding.Some companies are already doing this (I think it's an app using the phone's gps).
    Retro-fitting hardware to put the brakes on (as suggested by the EU) would be much more complicated,if even possible.


    They started fitting trackers to MOD vehicles a few years ago. I know I was very conscious of my speed when I was driving with one, so they do work.

    That said, most satnavs are enabled to recognise the prevailing speed limit, so I don't think it would be too difficult or expensive to link one to a speed governor, especially on a new vehicle.