microwave only?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 05, 2013 5:38 AM GMT
    Are there foods that you can only cook in the microwave? That is, you can't figure out how to cook them on the stove?

    For example, I'll make a big batch of brown rice and freeze it in 1 cup portions. I can't see how I'd heat/reheat the frozen rice on the stove; the microwave is perfect for that.

    Or, if you don't have a microwave, how do you cook dry or goopy stuff?
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    Sep 05, 2013 6:30 AM GMT
    Wow. I've never heard of anyone cooking rice in the microwave. icon_eek.gif

    Rice is easy to cook. Just get a rice cooker. icon_biggrin.gif

    I only use the microwave to re-heat food or warm up frozen entrees. I think microwave cooking was huge in the late 70s and early 80s. I recall seeing several microwave cookbooks at the library.

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    Sep 05, 2013 6:31 AM GMT
    Oh wait. I take that back. I occasionally "bake" a potato in the microwave. Surprisingly, it turns out well.
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    Sep 05, 2013 6:44 AM GMT
    Sorry for the confusion about the rice. What I meant is heating it up after it's been frozen. I cook it in an electric pressure cooker, which is similar in operation to a rice cooker but perhaps a bit faster.

    Let me edit that sentence...
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    Sep 05, 2013 6:46 AM GMT
    xrichx saidOh wait. I take that back. I occasionally "bake" a potato in the microwave. Surprisingly, it turns out well.

    Yes, it's my favorite way to cook one; I like to eat the skin and prefer it soft. If you're not worried about presentation I like to cut it into many pieces and cook it in a glass bowl, covered, stirring it after several minutes and pouring off any collected condensation.
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    Sep 05, 2013 6:54 AM GMT
    A big part of the reason I'm asking is that for years I used the microwave for many things that would ordinarily be done on the stove; for example, boiling water.

    But I got a new stove and bringing to a boil 4 cups of water probably takes 3 or 4 minutes. Probably even less than 3, much less. This thing is fast.

    On the other end of the scale, its low settings are really nice and low; I could probably melt chocolate directly on it without having to use the bowl over simmering water method.

    So it's making me rethink how I've been cooking things.
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    Sep 05, 2013 7:00 AM GMT
    PLEASE be careful when using the microwave to boil water. icon_sad.gif


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    Sep 06, 2013 4:08 AM GMT
    I make microwaved potato chips. Otherwise it's mostly for heating water.

    2012May13001_1_1.jpg
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    Sep 09, 2013 7:54 PM GMT
    theantijock saidI make microwaved potato chips. Otherwise it's mostly for heating water.

    2012May13001_1_1.jpg

    What's the recipe for this? Sounds good.
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    Sep 09, 2013 8:39 PM GMT
    Not really. I can't think of anything that CAN'T be cooked some other way.

    Before Microwave, a lot of things used to be gently thawed and cooked in a double boiler.

    Or my Dad's favorite method was to throw a block of something frozen into an iron skillet with a spoonful of lard and turn it on high! Once it thaws out/starts smoking, maybe throw an egg in there and stir it all up. icon_redface.gificon_cry.gificon_redface.gif

    I don't recommend this.
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    Sep 09, 2013 10:11 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidWhat's the recipe for this? Sounds good.


    I learned about making chips while reading something else and it just made sense. Healthy potato chips. But for when I'm out having a sandwich, I've not bought a bag since I started making them.

    The micro dries the slices like a dehydrator. You have to be very careful towards the end not to burn. They take about 8 minutes, then turn and if desired separate, then another two or until done. It varies greatly based upon how much potato is being cooked, slice dimensions, etc.

    I made those by slicing thin though now I have a mandolin to slice even thinner. Then I spray coat a glass pan with olive oil just to keep from sticking. And then just add whatever you want, just salt, or garlic powder, whatever. Those in pic are done with fresh garlic which turn into little garlic chips, and rosemary and probably some salt and pepper.

    With the mandolin they get so thin as to take the shape of the glass pan. You could probably make potato chip bowls and then fill that with tuna salad or something like a bread bowl for soup.

    It may not be quite as tasty as store bought but they're pretty good and it totally satisfies the desire to eat crunchy.
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    Sep 09, 2013 11:47 PM GMT
    Ok, thanks. I'll try it some time. Russet or some other type?
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    Sep 09, 2013 11:52 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidBefore Microwave, a lot of things used to be gently thawed and cooked in a double boiler.

    Thawing frozen stuff is probably the main thing I use the microwave for now. And for something that's dry, like brown rice I've frozen and thawed in the fridge for 24 hours.

    I think I'm saving electricity by using the stove instead of the microwave. My microwave has something called an inverter which I suspect is shunting some of the power away but the magnetron or whatever is still using 100% of the power. On lower settings it doesn't cycle on and off like my old one did.
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    Sep 10, 2013 1:19 AM GMT
    From a quick Google search, it looks like those inverter technology microwave ovens are still cycling on and off, only at very high frequency, using pulse-width modulation. The super fast on-off cycles make the heating much more even than being cranked on high for a number of seconds then turned off for a number of seconds.
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    Sep 10, 2013 3:01 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidOk, thanks. I'll try it some time. Russet or some other type?


    I've tried a number of them, whichever look good at the store, but haven't really paid very much attention to results but to note that some are tougher to dry out and some remain somewhat soggy.

    I think I had trouble getting new potatoes to crisp. Regular baking potatoes seem to work well best. I tried a yam or sweet but it didn't come out so good. That was early on before I had the timing down so maybe I'll try it again. I think you just need to experiment and see what works for you. Oh, and no need to peel. Just scrub under the faucet and slice.
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    Sep 10, 2013 3:15 AM GMT
    paradox saidFrom a quick Google search, it looks like those inverter technology microwave ovens are still cycling on and off, only at very high frequency, using pulse-width modulation. The super fast on-off cycles make the heating much more even than being cranked on high for a number of seconds then turned off for a number of seconds.

    Ah, thanks. Very good to know.
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    Sep 10, 2013 3:36 AM GMT
    I do scrambled eggs in the microwave. It does take some stirring between jolts.
  • Rhi_Bran

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    Sep 14, 2013 3:39 AM GMT
    You shouldn't try to bake microwave dinners in the oven. Molten plastic does not taste very good.
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    Sep 14, 2013 7:10 AM GMT
    Rhi_Bran saidYou shouldn't try to bake microwave dinners in the oven. Molten plastic does not taste very good.

    Agreed. Although I haven't had one in years. I used to love Stouffers macaroni and cheese. I've had to really cut back on the rich stuff.