Intensity of cardio workouts

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 10, 2007 2:40 PM GMT
    Hey all, just curious what people do for a cardio workout. How long and how intense do people work? Does anyone regularly use a heart rate monitor chest band and if so what do you try to keep your heart rate at.
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Jan 10, 2007 5:01 PM GMT
    Hi Red: I love intense cardio, and there are a few ways I get it. I've been teaching spin bike classes since the bikes first came out. I always warn people who attend the classes that it's cardiovascular exercise in a league all its own. I also love the LifeFitness Crosstrainer. When I was thirty-seven I made a goal for myself that I would be able to get the calorie-burned meter to hit the 800 mark by the time I turned forty. A week before my birthday, I did 818 calories in thirty minutes on the machine. I don't know how accurate the reading is, but when everyone else is struggling to hit 500 calories in the same amount of time, it's a pretty awesome achievement. Jamie Sale, the figure skater, sometimes would work out next to me, and she once told me that she had never seen anyone sweat as much as me. Still, my heart rate usually doesn't get much higher than about 162 during the hardest parts. The thing I like about that machine is the fact that I can watch the readouts and determine the relationship between my intensity level, the RPMs, my heart rate and the calories burned. It's a great piece of equipment.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Jan 10, 2007 6:14 PM GMT
    hey red:

    if you are doing cardio for overall good health. use the Max Aerobic HR formula www.markallenonline.com/base.asp Learn to teach your body to burn fat as fuel not carbs. the spin guy reply, is only burning carbs and over training. not very healthy or safe. Use a HR monitor with a chest strap. the equipment in the gyms are not very reliable. hope that helps you.
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    Jan 10, 2007 6:44 PM GMT
    Thanks for the replies, Art and US!

    That's an interesting, article US. My reason for posting was to get an idea of what people are doing and yes maybe modify what I'm doing. I do use a heart rate monitor chest strap for my cardio workouts. I really don't see how I got along without one before or anyone does without them for that matter.

    Anyway, like Mark Allen says, it just feels too easy keeping my heart rate as low as he recommends. Plus, I feel like even though I'm nearing 40, I don't think my maximum heart rate should be compared to someone my age who isn't active. So yeah, I confess I tend to get pretty intense and have to work to keep from getting my heart rate up to the 150s and 160s which like you, a few others tell me is too vigorous. I can easily keep in in the 160s for an entire session.

    I feel fine while doing it but I don't want be the kind of guy who thinks he knows it all. I don't. So I guess I need give this a try then and see what kind of results I get.
  • art_smass

    Posts: 960

    Jan 10, 2007 9:01 PM GMT
    I'm not overtraining. I'm a twenty-year veteran of the fitness business who is the ONLY guy I know who hasn't had a fitness-related injury of any kind. Coming from someone in endurance sports, that comment only seems more self-centered. No one has more injuries than runners. Anyway, he asked what people did for cardio, and I told him what I do. I use the cross-trainer once a week and I teach two spin classes. You do Ironman triathlons, so get a grip.
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    Jan 10, 2007 9:45 PM GMT
    Honestly I am interested in what others are doing. I see people at the gym who seem fairly lost on their plan as I sometimes feel lost when it comes to doing any resistance training. My higher intensity has been good for me, I feel. However, I'm willing to consider other ideas and that's why I was curious what you other guys do.

    Like I said, I just kind of consider myself a student and part o why I'm here is to learn and get exposed to other methods.

    So again, I think you both for taking the time to do just that!

    Steve
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    Jan 27, 2007 10:19 PM GMT
    You'll like this one then ! Not!

    I dont do your traditional cardio ie running and all that malarchy my cardio vascular workout is from the intensity of my workout which is structured for thsi purpose.

    So its long slow lifts, supersets, tricets and quads with minimal rests in between. It gets the heart racing but enables you to keep the lungs in control.

    End result BP down HR down and weight down.
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    Jan 29, 2007 3:28 PM GMT
    That's a good point I think. I've been reading some about keeping your heart rate elevated during a weight training session so that it's got a cardio aspect as well. I guess that's a newer concept but it does make sense. My weakness is weight training as anyone can tell hehe. But I am trying to be conscious of that on a workout. A heart rate monitor is a great help.
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    Jan 31, 2007 4:49 AM GMT
    I came into weight training from a background of competitive distance running...lots of structured workouts, sequenced races, running and duathlons (they were called biathlons back ten) and was very successful runner. However, I shudder when I look at pictures of myself back then. I was a twig.

    Now, I am willing to wager, I am still a nutty runner compared to most on realjock...still managing abotu 50 miles per week, with no injuries...no arthritis...nada. But I have also worked in lots of weight training, comparatively (about 5 hr per week).

    I'm not advocating the running. It's just something I do. But it burns calories about as efficiently as any activity, minute for minute. By the way, the running I am talking about is NOT on treadmills or other machines. No matter what the dials say, you are NOT running, say, a six minute per mile pace on such devices. At least you're not running that equivalent to what you could do even on a flat road...because even on a flat road there are irregularities and hard pavement which is not "giving" at all. Oops...that's a tangent. Sorry.

    Running works well when intermixed with weight training, if you like running.