Help designing movement sequence!

  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 11, 2013 6:14 PM GMT
    Ciao everyone,

    I'm currently experimenting with creating various movement sequences for differing purposes (opening the shoulders, lengthening back, awakening core, etc.).
    Right now I'm interested in making one for myself (and others if interested), for an early morning wake up and preparation for the day.

    So my questions are:

    1. What movements/actions do you consider to be fundamental, that you would incorporate in some manner?

    2. In what order would you approach the different parts of the body/mind, assuming you're beginning straight after waking up?
  • Ethrim

    Posts: 44

    Sep 11, 2013 6:48 PM GMT
    I almost always have a mixture of a stretch, then a ballet (barre) warm up, and then a (Graham) modern movement to finish getting my body happy.
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 11, 2013 6:52 PM GMT
    What stretches, which part of the barre, and which graham? ;)
  • Ethrim

    Posts: 44

    Sep 11, 2013 7:06 PM GMT
    I stretch from the top down, so neck, shoulders, arms, little bit of back. then hips/legs, ankles, wrist, and then more back.

    then ballet is plie/releve, tendu, rond de jambe a terre, rond de jambe en l'air (90 degrees), then repeat at about 120 degrees, or where my body says it'll work. then degage, battlements.

    For the Graham tech, I like to do...well...a lot of her basic vocabulary. The contraction/ release feels so good in the morning.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Sep 11, 2013 7:07 PM GMT
    I think he means Martha Graham, but I like graham cracker better.

    Tried Tai Chi? It sounds right down you alley. [pun]

  • Ethrim

    Posts: 44

    Sep 11, 2013 7:09 PM GMT
    HOW DID YOU KNOW I MEANT THE CRACKER? D:
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 12, 2013 11:40 AM GMT
    Ethrim saidI stretch from the top down, so neck, shoulders, arms, little bit of back. then hips/legs, ankles, wrist, and then more back.

    then ballet is plie/releve, tendu, rond de jambe a terre, rond de jambe en l'air (90 degrees), then repeat at about 120 degrees, or where my body says it'll work. then degage, battlements.

    For the Graham tech, I like to do...well...a lot of her basic vocabulary. The contraction/ release feels so good in the morning.



    Are your stretches staticdynamicpnf....?

    Is your barre work all in turn out?

    I've only learned a little Graham, sadly. Is that contraction release stuff while sitting, or lying?
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 12, 2013 11:41 AM GMT
    LJay saidI think he means Martha Graham, but I like graham cracker better.

    Tried Tai Chi? It sounds right down you alley. [pun]



    Not enough, but yes. I've been practicing a daoyin exercise taught by a master in Sydney that's really interesting. Wave hands.
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 12, 2013 11:45 AM GMT
    S5000I saidI model my morning routines on John Romaniello's Neural Wake Up Call (NWUC). The basic template can be found in several places online, and it is mostly lower-body dominate. The sequence is easy enough to modify so it addresses a person's specific needs, such as mobility and/or reinforcing movement patterns.

    I stay away from long duration static stretches since the body is cold upon waking. If necessary I'll add a few more repetitions of the dynamic movements and increase the range.

    Movements I consider fundamental are lower-body movements that break up the hips. The spiderman lunges work nicely, but so do goblet squats with a lateral shift. Thoracic extension movements. Actions to open the shoulders like over-unders. And a bodyweight compound like pushups or squats for more CNS activation.

    The above is pretty much my order of approach. Single-limb with increasing ROM in subsequent repetitions, thoracic, shoulder/upper-body work, then once the body is warmed up an increasingly dynamic compound.


    I'll look NWUC up, thank you very much =]

    What do you mean by 'break up the hips'? Just moving them through their range of motion in flexionextensionrotation?

    May i ask why you work from the limbs first?
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 12, 2013 3:18 PM GMT
    Not necessarily dancing, but I guess I am a bit biased. ;)

    A question about starting with the 'weaker' side. Do you end up doing the same amount of repetitions? And do you finish one side before beginning on the other?

    If you compare the two sides of your body afterwards, does it feel more even/balanced/equally available after you do this sequence?

  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    Sep 18, 2013 9:29 PM GMT
    Whoops! Missed the last reply.

    My training regimen is actually fairly loose at the moment. I do a lot of feldenkrais in the mornings, and whenever I can through the day. When I have a spare moment, I find a spot, and explore a motion, taking it from slow to vigorous usually, doing many repetitions, discovering the subtleties of it. I try to make sure that I'm touching upon different parts of my body through the day, and of course it depends on which parts feel the need, or are painful. Still nursing a bunch of old injuries, hence keeping things generally slow.

    In terms of the original idea of this post, I was looking to see if there were things that I was completely missing, that I should examine more. The sequence should also eventually serve as an initial preparation/warm up. For instance, I made an exercise for my sister to help her open her shoulders and connect to her sternum and spine, that I find very good before a yoga series, for example. But at the moment, it is very upper body focused, and linear.