People Who Have Good Jobs- How'd You Get It?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 13, 2013 3:10 AM GMT
    I'm job hunting for a higher paying position but it's proving to be a frustrating uphill battle with the deck (seemingly) stacked against me. I'm getting interviews but unfortunately many interviewers put up a wall and I can tell within the first min or so they're not going to hire me or I think it went well and never hear back from them again...

    I have a college degree (then again so does everyone else) and have an demand skill set but no real job offers after 7 months of applying. Just some intern or "contract" offers.

    I got an eye opener when my BF told me he his current job by networking and his boss told him, he wouldn't have been hired if he didn't graduate from the same school he went to icon_eek.gif

    I'm happy he got a job finally but that's a bit unfair for other equally qualified candidates. Then again I met my BF through a mutual friend so that made him more trustworthy... like I've said before job hunting is like dating: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1278504

    Anyway, how'd you find your current job if you like it? Networking? Applying online? I'm curious to know since it's rough out there for job seekers.
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    Sep 13, 2013 3:17 AM GMT
    I think the answers you get will vary widely by location. I'm still in college but I'll use my brother as an example. He went to a university directly after high school and graduated with his bachelor's degree in computer science when he was 21 or 22, can't recall. He started sending out his resume (with no experience in the CS field) and got hired before graduation at a nationally known insurance company.

    Meanwhile, I hear about people in California having to basically be in bed with someone high on the food chain to get an entry level job.

    Of course networking is probably going to be the best way to get a job anywhere, but it's less necessary in other areas. Maybe my brother just got lucky, but it also depends on the demand in your field. For comparison, I'm an RN student and every student who graduated from the program last semester found employment within 1 month (a survey was done). But, the situation is more bleak in major metro areas in California/New England. I, however, live in Oklahoma. Big difference in job availability there.
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    Sep 13, 2013 3:33 AM GMT
    Im a Senior Mobile Developer and Software Solutions Architect. I got my job through contract work, and I love where I am right now, good pay and great benefits. Once you get your Computer Science degree or you build software that shows your skills and creativity it is very easy to find work at a high pay. I know that if I quit my job i can get a 15% salary increase elsewhere due to my experience but I really like where I am and I wouldnt change that for a bit if money.


    I think linked in and recruting agencies can help you out quite a bit.
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    Sep 13, 2013 3:41 AM GMT
    I've gotten the last 2 or 3 jobs as referrals from friends and acquaintances. In this day and age where almost everyone has a college degree, it's really about who you know and not so much about what you know.

    So network, network, network. Get yourself out there.
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    Sep 13, 2013 3:45 AM GMT
    charlitos saidIm a Senior Mobile Developer and Software Solutions Architect. I got my job through contract work, and I love where I am right now, good pay and great benefits. Once you get your Computer Science degree or you build software that shows your skills and creativity it is very easy to find work at a high pay.


    CS is a good field to be in right now.

    I do a bit of freelance mobile web design and optimization for small business owners as something I'm building up on my own here in NYC and they're always sending me referrals of their friends businesses. Would be great if it were more stable and frequent since it's in demand by all types of companies, I'd work with much larger companies but I'm self taught so I don't know as much as others in the field.

    Already on LinkedIn but I think I need to actively use it more often.
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    Sep 13, 2013 3:46 AM GMT
    Erobert said
    I have a college degree (then again so does everyone else) and have an demand skill set but no real job offers after 7 months of applying. Just some intern or "contract" offers.


    Internships and temp work are the new "entry level" positions...since the job listings for entry level positions usually look something like this:

    "Entry level position. Requires a bachelor's degree in [ insert major here ] and 3+ years of experience doing [ insert list of job duties here ]."

    That's the catch 22 for young graduates: you need experience in your field in order to start work in your field. But you can't get experience unless you actually start working in your field.

    I just started a new position last month as a Scientist for a Pharma company. I applied for lots of jobs online, and a recruiting agency found my resume. The agency took my resume and submitted it to companies who were looking to hire people with my laboratory skill sets. Long story short, I'm now working for one of those companies. ;)

    I say take the internship or contract work if its financially possible for you. The ticket to landing a good job isn't simply a degree anymore, but networking and your previous work experience. Even if that internship or contract work doesn't land you a permanent position, you will have gained work experience to put on your resume and you have plenty of opportunities to network during your assignment.

    Just my $0.02 from a fellow young graduate trying to find stable employment. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Sep 13, 2013 6:31 AM GMT
    I have had a couple interviews for jobs I should have gotten, I actually asked afterward, and they were happy to tell me what they thought. I was kinda pissed at the results. "I would have hired you but I thought you would leave"

    ..um..new interview strategy...clarify that point. Can't hurt right.
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    Sep 13, 2013 6:50 AM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    Apparition saidI have had a couple interviews for jobs I should have gotten, I actually asked afterward, and they were happy to tell me what they thought. I was kinda pissed at the results. "I would have hired you but I thought you would leave"

    ..um..new interview strategy...clarify that point. Can't hurt right.

    I asked that question too, after an interview.
    The lady looked at me pleasantly and said "We didn't hire you because, well, we didn't fucking feel like it. Have a nice day!"
    I got burned once. An interviewee asked what I thought of him and asked if I thought he was qualified for the job. I was honest. I told him that he seemed competent to do the job, but felt that he wouldn't enjoy it. By the way, it was a software related position, but he kept going on and on about his networking experience.

    So anyways, naturally he was in between jobs and was desperate for a paycheck. So with my feedback in his mind, he turned up the charm/hunger in the next round of interviews. And despite my thumbs down feedback to management, they hired him anyways. A year later, this guy is struggling bad and dragging down the rest of the team. And unfortunately, his manager doesn't have the balls fire him. icon_rolleyes.gif

    So now when an interviewee asks for my opinion about him, I just sidestep the question.
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    Sep 13, 2013 6:53 AM GMT
    Erobert saidI'm job hunting for a higher paying position but it's proving to be a frustrating uphill battle with the deck (seemingly) stacked against me. I'm getting interviews but unfortunately many interviewers put up a wall and I can tell within the first min or so they're not going to hire me or I think it went well and never hear back from them again...

    I have a college degree (then again so does everyone else) and have an demand skill set but no real job offers after 7 months of applying. Just some intern or "contract" offers.

    I got an eye opener when my BF told me he his current job by networking and his boss told him, he wouldn't have been hired if he didn't graduate from the same school he went to icon_eek.gif

    I'm happy he got a job finally but that's a bit unfair for other equally qualified candidates. Then again I met my BF through a mutual friend so that made him more trustworthy... like I've said before job hunting is like dating: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/1278504

    Anyway, how'd you find your current job if you like it? Networking? Applying online? I'm curious to know since it's rough out there for job seekers.


    Was writing something along the lines of an essay to your question but it brought too many thoughts that would need many hours to iron out and communicate them well enough for you to read it, so I will save that writing for another time perhaps or use it when someone else brings up a similar question, or if someone in particular posts in this thread, even with a simple gif or one word comment or something, I may consider spending the time to complete my thoughts on this matter (that's why I'm a lurker, and at best I'm an in-person conversationalist, and not a person that does it online).... I will say this though, bring a lot to the table and build relationships.












  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Sep 13, 2013 8:05 AM GMT
    Just like everyone else. Finished high school, stuck it out another 4 years, and then resume spammed the hell out of various different companies.

    It took me about three months before I found a career path I really liked. It's within the logistics field which is a huge plus considering that is one of the focuses of my major in college.

    During interviews there's a number of different factors that set you apart from other candidates. These are often arbitrary and minute. Your interviewer may simply not like the way you smile and will then give someone of equal experience the position over you.

    It's really like winning the lottery in the modern job hunting world. That's not to say that some have higher odds than others based on their previous accomplishments.
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    Sep 13, 2013 10:26 AM GMT
    Aristoshark said
    Apparition saidI have had a couple interviews for jobs I should have gotten, I actually asked afterward, and they were happy to tell me what they thought. I was kinda pissed at the results. "I would have hired you but I thought you would leave"

    ..um..new interview strategy...clarify that point. Can't hurt right.

    I asked that question too, after an interview.
    The lady looked at me pleasantly and said "We didn't hire you because, well, we didn't fucking feel like it. Have a nice day!"



    Maybe it was your excessive make-up.
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    Sep 13, 2013 10:37 AM GMT
    Am I really the only one here who's slept my way to the top?? How weird. .

    No, but seriously, I think your best bet is dedication and hard work. icon_biggrin.gif
  • KepaArg

    Posts: 1721

    Sep 13, 2013 11:22 AM GMT
    At the moment I work for my family, but I would say networking helps alot. I've got a job interview lined up once I'm in Sydney through a friends dad.
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    Sep 13, 2013 12:10 PM GMT
    I start creative companies,have not worked for anyone since high school. I can't even imagine what that sort of existence would be like.
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    Sep 13, 2013 12:16 PM GMT
    I've been interning (and getting paid!!!) in sales at a global communications firm in NY for the last two summers and now have the inside track to be hired full time when I finish college. My cousin works in the company, and he got me an interview. I did the rest.

    Sometimes it's who you know. A lot of the time, actually.
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    Sep 13, 2013 10:00 PM GMT
    Yeah, I knew someone who helped me get my foot in the door, but if I were incompetent I wouldn't have gotten where I am now. So half and half. It certainly helps, but not always necessary. The union is a big help, too. It takes perseverance, no one starts out at the top.
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    Sep 13, 2013 11:42 PM GMT
    Try a head hunter. Recent grads are sort of in a screwy situation at the moment. I had to do post-grad schooling after my first diploma to become really marketable. you might want to look at that. you can specialize in certain field or skill and that makes you a hot commodity.
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    Sep 14, 2013 12:35 AM GMT
    My niece knew nothing about technology or finance. While attending her mediocre state college for a communications degree she was a bartender at a high end franchise steak house and got her great job, dumbing down tech lit for training materials and hosting training seminars, from a bar patron who owned a company that makes custom internal software for financial corporations. I guess he found her personable and it didn't hurt that she's a knockout. Now at 28 she makes at least $80K (high for Florida) and bought a house which would be $1M if it were in my NYC suburb.

    Sort of reminded me of a gay neighbor who was the head of the New York division of a major film studio who hired a hot Fire Island Pines bartender as his secretary so he'd have medical insurance.

    I'd take a mixology course!
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    Sep 14, 2013 1:32 AM GMT
    MCB_ saidI've been interning (and getting paid!!!) in sales at a global communications firm in NY for the last two summers and now have the inside track to be hired full time when I finish college. My cousin works in the company, and he got me an interview. I did the rest.

    Sometimes it's who you know. A lot of the time, actually.


    I've been interning with an engineering company in CT my past two summers in a similar way. I got my job after a good interview I got at a SHPE Conference (society of hispanic professional engineers). Two summers later, I have a great track record with this company, more experience, connections, and some potential offers to consider. I'm so grateful.

    But at the same time I'd be painting a completely different picture about my job experience had I not been a part of SHPE. Your network >>> Your resume.

  • isuflyboy

    Posts: 363

    Sep 14, 2013 7:35 PM GMT
    The guy I like pulled a few string a and got me a job as airport operations manager!
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    Sep 14, 2013 7:38 PM GMT
    I got my job because I was willing to start at the bottom. I see with my kids that they expect a CEO type position and they don't understand why they don't get it. Find an area you like and take a lower paying job and work your way to where you want to be. I'm paid nicely now and have stayed there 30 years because it's been a good job.

    Everyone has a degree now, it's basically no advantage unless you're very specialized. Networking, who you know and starting at the bottom are your best bets.
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Sep 14, 2013 7:49 PM GMT
    I happened to find my current job when I first moved here 3 years ago through a Microsoft college board. I think it's rare to get something good in other parts of the country like that. But NYC is different in that way. In-person networking is HUGE! Attend Meetups, both professional and hobby. In the organizations I'm in I see jobs pass to people before they're even posted. An inside track is your best bet.

    Also, a web presence definitely goes a long way: having a website, recommendations on LinkedIn, a semi-professional blog. When I was first looking I was relentless in searching different sites (gov, corporate, academic, craigslist). Not just applying for anything, but for things I was interested in and what I thought would be a good fit. Previous experience with large recruiting firms taught me they're largely a waste of time. They're out for their own commission. Beware: Robert Half will never leave you alone once you go in... 3 years later, I can't stop their calls.

    Contract work is a great way to get in the door and close the gap on unemployment, but I'd continue searching if I was still in that position.

    Good luck!
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    Sep 14, 2013 7:55 PM GMT
    Statistically, more than two thirds of all positions are filled through networking. An ever-shrinking percentage is filled through internet job boards.

    Crappy jobs gave me the opportunity to tackle difficult challenges, gain experience, prove myself, and not make the news if, despite my best efforts, screwed something up. Today, I support visible and important projects with some great engineers watching my back, but at a small company with fewer than 100 people who hold me in high regard.

    I've worked at highly-regarded companies with coworkers who didn't have the history of crappy jobs to appreciate what some felt was the best work environment anyone would find. Then profit pressure hit that and I realized the time demand was unhealthy.

    Love my current job. Just wish there was a bigger gap between my living expenses and pay to put more on my 401K.
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    Sep 14, 2013 7:59 PM GMT
    TheBizMan saidJust like everyone else. Finished high school, stuck it out another 4 years, and then resume spammed the hell out of various different companies.




    Don't do that. By the way, I'm a paying client of Paul Anderson, who has done more good for my job search strategy...
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    Sep 14, 2013 8:06 PM GMT
    When I graduated from college with my Comp Sci degree it was around 9/11 and the economy was rough. I took a low paying but high visibility programming job - worked my ass off to get experience and then through a referral got my current job at a very large corp. When I got there I kept my head down, worked my ass off and proved I was a reliable and hard working employee.

    Now, through my network, I am approached to fill positions within the company and not the other way around. It's who you know absolutely, but it's also their reputation at stake so when they recommend you, you better have convinced them you can deliver.

    Good luck with the search!