What words/phrases irk you?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:20 AM GMT
    for me it's:

    man cave

    sorry, my bad

    110% (as in "I want your 110% effort")

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:24 AM GMT
    "YOLO"
    "Swag"
    "Homeboy"
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:26 AM GMT
    bussy
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:27 AM GMT
    Any word/phrase that is profane.
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:28 AM GMT
    "Impact" used as a verb. I admit, I do it too. But only because the suits won't understand. Gotta speak their lingo to get stuff done. icon_neutral.gif
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:29 AM GMT
    Neight saidbussy


    Yessss, ugh that word sounds gross!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 14, 2013 6:22 AM GMT
    HASHTAG

    It's the fracking Pound sign.
    I'll also except it as the number sign.
    hashtag my ass.
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    Sep 14, 2013 6:23 AM GMT
    va jay jay

    kim jun il

    tits

    pussy juice

    so cuteeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee(high squeaky voice at the end for the "E")

    sweet ass(like seriously,someone just whoop the honey around the anus make it tastes sweet)

    wet

    i came


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    Sep 14, 2013 6:30 AM GMT
    Nigger (a)
    YOLO
    Ghetto
    Bro
    Puss
    Snot
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    Sep 14, 2013 7:18 AM GMT
    xrichx said"Impact" used as a verb. I admit, I do it too. But only because the suits won't understand. Gotta speak their lingo to get stuff done. icon_neutral.gif

    Same here; I'm a grammar and correct word nit.

    The other one for me is using alternate when they should have used alternative. Alternate means to switch between 2 states, like on and off.

    And I've finally learned (I hope) to restrain myself from correcting people online who use it's the contraction when they meant its the possessive. The easy rule to remember is his, hers, and its; all three possessive and no apostrophe for any of them.

    Oh, and using setup, the noun, as a verb; "I helped Joe setup his system." No, that would be "I helped Joe set up his system." Correct would be, "Joe has a nice setup."

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    Sep 14, 2013 5:48 PM GMT
    "Prolly"

    Think I shorted out a few brain cells the first time I saw it.
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:53 PM GMT
    Anocxu said"Prolly"

    Think I shorted out a few brain cells the first time I saw it.

    You prolly did.
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    Sep 14, 2013 5:54 PM GMT
    *Reaches for tazer*..
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    Sep 14, 2013 6:02 PM GMT
    What words/phrases irk you?

    irk
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 14, 2013 6:58 PM GMT
    Before I better understood its meaning, the word proactive once bothered me, especially by its overuse as corporate speak came into, fortunately short-lived, vogue. The overuse still bugs me. So does "exceeds expectations" which just strikes me as smarmy.

    Turns out proactive is not merely a redundant play on active v reactive, rather, it specifies a particular type of reaction which anticipates and thereby prepares for or even remedies in advance a possible future reaction to an immediate action. Whereas reactive might be considered but more often connotes kneejerk or reflex, proactive denotes considered.

    For instance. A customer wants to buy a product or lodge a complaint. The customer service person sells a product or solves the problem. That's action (customer's request or complaint) & reaction (customer service person sells or solves).

    But what if...

    A customer comes in to buy a product. A customer service person after questioning the customer suggests this product instead of that product, foreseeing by the customer's input that this product, not that product, will better suit their needs. That's action (customer's request) & being proactive (customer service person's response).

    Being proactive is neither equal nor opposite the immediacy of an action because it considers both a future time and the possible chain of events.

    It still bothers me a little in that why wouldn't a reaction in itself consider aspects denoted by proactive. But to look at a conglomeration of all the definitions of reaction, it tends to exude not just an immediacy but an antagonistic one: exert reciprocal, counteracting, in opposition--good for putting out a fire but in regard to customer loyalty, not so very business friendly.

    Now as to the phrase that irks me the most, that would be "no, I won't have sex with you."
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Sep 14, 2013 7:21 PM GMT
    people that say "irregardless" I wanna kill with my bare hands.

  • PR_GMR

    Posts: 3831

    Sep 14, 2013 7:37 PM GMT
    Sup?
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    Sep 14, 2013 7:53 PM GMT
    Aristoshark saidOh, so many.
    "Task" used as a verb. It is a fucking NOUN.
    "Proactive" - ridiculous. The opposite of "reactive" is "active". There is no reason for that silly prefix.

    Actually the dictionary does recognize task as a verb. I hope you don't mind if you are tasked to look it up for yourself. icon_wink.gif

    As for "proactive" I agree it sounds redundant. But it first appears somewhere around 1930, and dictionaries now accept it. I take it to convey a stronger meaning of the root word active, intended as a counterpoise to reactive, which you mention.
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    Sep 14, 2013 8:02 PM GMT
    Import saidpeople that say "irregardless" I wanna kill with my bare hands.

    Strictly speaking that's a non-word, or at best should not be used in a formal context, like "ain't", and perhaps those should have a category of their own. As opposed to legitimate words & phrases that are misused and overused.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Sep 14, 2013 8:04 PM GMT
    "No problem," in response to a "thank you." The response is, "YOU'RE WELCOME!" icon_mad.gif
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    Sep 14, 2013 8:25 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    Actually the dictionary does recognize task as a verb. I hope you don't mind if you are tasked to look it up for yourself.

    Hah, you actually reminded me of one that I'd never actually thought about until a coworker friend actually pointed it out to me: "actually."

    It's actually a useless filler word. Actually, in almost all instances you can actually remove it and not actually change the meaning of the sentence in any way. Or, you can actually add it willy nilly and sound silly.

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    Sep 14, 2013 9:08 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    Aristoshark saidOh, so many.
    "Task" used as a verb. It is a fucking NOUN.

    Actually the dictionary does recognize task as a verb. I hope you don't mind if you are tasked to look it up for yourself. icon_wink.gif

    Unfortunately, these days dictionaries are useless for determining what is proper English speech (or what an educated person would use). They merely record (as much as they are able) every word that anyone has been heard using (even "made-up" words and slang). Most times they do not even designate such words as slang, or even dialect. Online dictionaries are the worst offenders. One can find "ain't" in many dictionaries, a slang word that is often used, but never in an official or business setting. I would not be surprised to find "ax" ("axe"?) included as a form of the verb "to ask."
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    Sep 14, 2013 9:12 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    Import saidpeople that say "irregardless" I wanna kill with my bare hands.

    Strictly speaking that's a non-word, or at best should not be used in a formal context, like "ain't", and perhaps those should have a category of their own. As opposed to legitimate words & phrases that are misused and overused.

    I would agree that "irregardless is not a word. The prefix "ir" adds no meaning to the already existing adverb "regardless."
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    Sep 14, 2013 9:13 PM GMT
    Manpussy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 14, 2013 9:19 PM GMT
    "Like," as in the expressions, "he's like, "I'm like," "I was like, "he was like."