To all the drivers out there, I have a question... pleeease

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 15, 2013 11:18 PM GMT
    So I am finally teaching myself how to drive, well, with my mom of course. I currently have a learner's permit and I really want to get my official driver's license and start driving. icon_smile.gif

    I have a problem though...

    I have a hard time making sure I stay in the center of my lane. Yesterday, I drove the car and my mom and older sister were inside as well. When they noticed that I was too close to the side of the road, they yelled "YOURE SOOO CLOOOSE!!! WERE GONNA FALL!!!" at me and it made me soo scared. They're really not helping at all. grrr

    i know i need to practice more but do you guys have any tips on how I can make sure I am inside my lane, not too close to either side? I did my research online, and according to some articles Ive read, I need to look ahead down the road instead of always looking at the while/yellow lane lines. Do you have any other strategies or techniques.

    I am so paranoid. I dont want to hit a car or fall into a gutter. huhu

    Also, i really wanna learn how to drive before October ends. My mom and stepdad are leaving for New Jersey and no ones gonna take me to work. huhu

    HELP! :C
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    Sep 15, 2013 11:33 PM GMT
    A friend took a performance car driving school and the instructor told her to look in the direction you want to go. Your hands will naturally steer into that direction. So keep your focus inside the lane ahead.

    The worst thing passengers can do is yell, "WATCH OUT!!" because you'll start scanning all around...thinking there's a pedestrian or semi bearing down on you.





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    Sep 15, 2013 11:37 PM GMT
    Tangiers said
    The worst thing passengers can do is yell, "WATCH OUT!!" because you'll start scanning all around...thinking there's a pedestrian or semi bearing down on you.

    Oh gawd, my husband does that all the time! He's always yelling "Watch out!" which makes me panic and look all around. Watch WHAT, WHERE?

    "There was a dog coming down that driveway." WTF?

    "That guy looked like he was gonna turn in front of you." Lord, give me strength. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Sep 15, 2013 11:38 PM GMT
    Tangiers saidA friend took a performance car driving school and the instructor told her to look in the direction you want to go. Your hands will naturally steer into that direction. So keep your focus inside the lane ahead.

    The worst thing passengers can do is yell, "WATCH OUT!!" because you'll start scanning all around...thinking there's a pedestrian or semi bearing down on you.





    Thank you Tangiers. When driving i always look at the sides. lol Yea i should do that next time my mom lets me drive.

    They were literally shouting at me when I was driving. I was like "CALM DOWN! I am the one driving!" haha

    thanks
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    Sep 15, 2013 11:46 PM GMT
    Jantheman saidDo you have any other strategies or techniques.

    In ancient times, when US high schools still had driver's ed courses, we were taught to look as far forward as we could. The theory was that as our eyes looked, so would our hands steer the car.

    We still had to practice continuous scanning, left-right, in the mirrors, and to the road immediately in front of us. But always back to a more distant view, and that is what would keep our car centered within the lane, automatically.

    A poor technique is to try visually aligning your fenders with the curb, and the white line next to you. That will cause you to zig-zag left & right. Your eyes should be looking forward and beyond your car itself, making your path more straight & steady.

    Google for "car driving techniques" and you'll see lots of examples.
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    Sep 15, 2013 11:50 PM GMT
    Jantheman said
    Tangiers saidA friend took a performance car driving school and the instructor told her to look in the direction you want to go. Your hands will naturally steer into that direction. So keep your focus inside the lane ahead.

    The worst thing passengers can do is yell, "WATCH OUT!!" because you'll start scanning all around...thinking there's a pedestrian or semi bearing down on you.





    Thank you Tangiers. When driving i always look at the sides. lol Yea i should do that next time my mom lets me drive.

    They were literally shouting at me when I was driving. I was like "CALM DOWN! I am the one driving!" haha

    thanks


    Yeah, family members are the notorious for 'helping' to drive. Its very common...and not about you.

    But practice maneuvers in an empty parking lot. Go around in a circle, turn left, then right, back up into a parking space, parallel park. Drive into a parking spot. Shut the car off, get out and see how accurately you can get in-between the lanes. Maybe bring small empty food boxes and see if you can drive between them without hitting. All this gets you used to the corners of the car, and your relation to them from behind the wheel.

    In my teens, I worked at a large car dealership. We had a large empty lot called "the corral" and I learned every trick that possible with a car...burnouts, reverse 180's you name it. It was fun, but also made me a better driver.
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    Sep 16, 2013 12:02 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    Jantheman saidDo you have any other strategies or techniques.

    In ancient times, when US high schools still had driver's ed courses, we were taught to look as far forward as we could. The theory was that as our eyes looked, so would our hands steer the car.

    We still had to practice continuous scanning, left-right, in the mirrors, and to the road immediately in front of us. But always back to a more distant view, and that is what would keep our car centered within the lane, automatically.

    A poor technique is to try visually aligning your fenders with the curb, and the white line next to you. That will cause you to zig-zag left & right. Your eyes should be looking forward and beyond your car itself, making your path more straight & steady.

    Google for "car driving techniques" and you'll see lots of examples.



    Thanks a lot for this! yup I will research some more! icon_smile.gif what do you mean by "fenders"?
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    Sep 16, 2013 12:06 AM GMT
    Tangiers said
    Yeah, family members are the notorious for 'helping' to drive. Its very common...and not about you.

    But practice maneuvers in an empty parking lot. Go around in a circle, turn left, then right, back up into a parking space, parallel park. Drive into a parking spot. Shut the car off, get out and see how accurately you can get in-between the lanes. Maybe bring small empty food boxes and see if you can drive between them without hitting. All this gets you used to the corners of the car, and your relation to them from behind the wheel.

    In my teens, I worked at a large car dealership. We had a large empty lot called "the corral" and I learned every trick that possible with a car...burnouts, reverse 180's you name it. It was fun, but also made me a better driver.



    Yeah. I have been driving after work. Since I get out at 6pm, the campus parking lot is almost abandoned. So my mom and I would drive there. She makes me do a lot of turning for now because I am having hard time turning and then driving straight again. lol but i think i am better at it now.

    Also with parking, I am trying my best to do it. hehe

    Whew. Its a lotta work but i wish i can learn it and be driving all by myself ASAP!
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    Sep 16, 2013 12:13 AM GMT
    Jantheman said
    Thanks a lot for this! yup I will research some more! icon_smile.gif what do you mean by "fenders"?

    YW. Perhaps the better modern word would be your "hood" (or bonnet if you're British). Older cars had distinctive fenders over the tires, and even after cars had a continuous flat hood, the left and right front sides were still referred to as fenders. So think of it as the front edges of your hood, as seen from the driver's seat.

    Here's a car with real fenders over the front tires, with a separate hood over the engine (along with us there, too):

    file_zps64060f01.jpg

    More fenders, and over the rear tires, too:

    file_zpsc719f47b.jpg
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:06 AM GMT
    Rule 1. Ask the overly critical occupants of your vehicle, "Does this car have two steering wheels?" If the answer is no, tell them to either shut the fuck up or walk.
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:10 AM GMT
    turbobilly saidRule 1. Ask the overly critical occupants of your vehicle, "Does this car have two steering wheels?" If the answer is no, tell them to either shut the fuck up or walk.



    Or stuff them in the trunk.
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    I don't know how I learned to stay in the center. I feel like after you've driven enough, you'll just know. Driving and all that goes with it becomes instinctual after a while.
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:25 AM GMT
    I remember first learning to drive and I believe there is a natural tendency for beginning drivers to want to put themselves physically in the center of the lane. (This would be fine if the driver and steering wheel were in the center of the car). However, this means that since the driver is on the left side of the car, there is a tendency for beginning driver to be driving too far to the right in the lane.

    Once it was pointed out to me, I tried to pay attention and correct for that natural inclination. And as Phillips pointed out, with time, you learn to center the car in the lane without thinking about it.
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:26 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    turbobilly saidRule 1. Ask the overly critical occupants of your vehicle, "Does this car have two steering wheels?" If the answer is no, tell them to either shut the fuck up or walk.



    Or stuff them in the trunk.


    That's Rule 2.
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:52 AM GMT
    turbobilly saidRule 1. Ask the overly critical occupants of your vehicle, "Does this car have two steering wheels?" If the answer is no, tell them to either shut the fuck up or walk.



    HAHAHA. my mom OMG shes sooo scared when im driving HAHA but yeah, its not helping me at all
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:58 AM GMT
    With my car, I am extra careful to stay towards the center, as the alignment of my steering wheel is off.
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    Sep 16, 2013 2:02 AM GMT
    In my early driving years, my Mom loved to SLAM down on her phantom passenger side brake...icon_rolleyes.gif
  • isuflyboy

    Posts: 363

    Sep 16, 2013 2:22 AM GMT
    I've been driving since I was 5, and idk it just came natural to me because I always had a fourwheeler or dirt bike.. I mean the first car I drove by myself was an old 5 speed ford f-150 and I was 7
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    Sep 16, 2013 3:00 AM GMT
    isuflyboy saidI've been driving since I was 5, and idk it just came natural to me because I always had a fourwheeler or dirt bike.. I mean the first car I drove by myself was an old 5 speed ford f-150 and I was 7



    wow at first i thought you were being sarcastic. but seriously? wow. i just started driving and im 22 now lol
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    Sep 16, 2013 4:28 AM GMT
    Jantheman said
    Tangiers said
    Yeah, family members are the notorious for 'helping' to drive. Its very common...and not about you.

    But practice maneuvers in an empty parking lot. Go around in a circle, turn left, then right, back up into a parking space, parallel park. Drive into a parking spot. Shut the car off, get out and see how accurately you can get in-between the lanes. Maybe bring small empty food boxes and see if you can drive between them without hitting. All this gets you used to the corners of the car, and your relation to them from behind the wheel.

    In my teens, I worked at a large car dealership. We had a large empty lot called "the corral" and I learned every trick that possible with a car...burnouts, reverse 180's you name it. It was fun, but also made me a better driver.



    Yeah. I have been driving after work. Since I get out at 6pm, the campus parking lot is almost abandoned. So my mom and I would drive there. She makes me do a lot of turning for now because I am having hard time turning and then driving straight again. lol but i think i am better at it now.

    Also with parking, I am trying my best to do it. hehe

    Whew. Its a lotta work but i wish i can learn it and be driving all by myself ASAP!


    You are smart to do that. Professional race car drivers practice driving all the time. You really can't practice driving too much or learning more about how your car will react in different situations. I've lived in FL for the past 4 years, but will be spending part of the winter up in Massachusetts....so looks like I will be "learning" how to drive on snow and ice all over again. icon_rolleyes.gif

    8kwkeicx.jpg

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    Sep 16, 2013 4:49 AM GMT
    I had the same problem as yours earlier when I just got my license. The main problem is that you're too nervous. What I did was I tried stay aligned with the car in front of me. If I'm still not sure enough, I'll look my side mirror to examine am I on the line or beside the line to ensure that I'm in the middle. Just relax and focus, don't think about it too much when you're driving, eventually you'll get to it. And practice makes perfect, I didn't learn driving with my family, I practice with my friends beside me, this calms my nerve and allowed me to practice well.
  • tckrguys

    Posts: 133

    Sep 16, 2013 12:56 PM GMT
    Remember you have to constantly make slight adjustments with the steering wheel. Don't try to hold the steering wheel in one position. Also, as mentioned your hands will follow your eyes so look straight ahead and let the front of the car be your guide.
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    Sep 16, 2013 1:34 PM GMT
    Jantheman said
    I have a hard time making sure I stay in the center of my lane.


    Remember the height of your seat is important..
    You might need more visual clearance to see clearly over the hood.. (Adjusting your seat very high.)
    (believe me this helps big time)

    And..

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    Sep 16, 2013 2:24 PM GMT
    Jantheman said
    turbobilly saidRule 1. Ask the overly critical occupants of your vehicle, "Does this car have two steering wheels?" If the answer is no, tell them to either shut the fuck up or walk.

    HAHAHA. my mom OMG shes sooo scared when im driving HAHA but yeah, its not helping me at all

    Typical of parents, though knowing that still doesn't help you to relax. My younger sister came to me when she was just learning to drive, legal at 17 in New Jersey, and said our Father was making it impossible for her to learn, with his loud & panicky reactions.

    I had been spared that, because I insisted on transferring to a public high school my junior year, that gave driver's ed in dual-control cars, my parents didn't teach me. But she was still attending a private girl's school without that course, as my boy's prep also hadn't, and Dad was a dreadful teacher, using one of his enormous cars that even intimidated me.

    So I took her in mine, a little smaller than Dad's though still kinda big, my "bring along the gang" car. But although my other car was a much smaller 2-seater it had a clutch, so we went with the automatic.

    I took her to quiet country roads I knew, and said almost nothing, just letting her practice and learn on her own. I was less her instructor than her safety net. The few times she drifted dangerously (most beginners have trouble staying in lane) I just reached over calmly and nudged the steering wheel a little, as I had told her I would. And if she appeared flustered I assured her she was doing fine, she'd soon get the hang of it, I don't think I ever raised my voice or was harshly critical.

    Barely a month later I left for the Army as I turned 20, and she wrote me that she passed her driving test. She thanked me for helping her, it made all the difference. Oddly enough when I had retired and visited her here in Florida she owned cars almost as big as Dad's had been, and when she lent them to me to use (I usually rode down by motorcycle) she made a point of reminiscing about me teaching her to drive, almost 30 years earlier. And how my being calm and soft-spoken, compared to our screaming & hysterical Dad, had helped her learn much more easily.

    So yeah, I can believe that's what you need, too, and avoid the parents in the car as much as possible. Provided you can find competent replacements.
  • conservativej...

    Posts: 2465

    Sep 16, 2013 2:28 PM GMT
    Remove all persons from your car who scream while you are driving. I'm serious.

    Relax. Soon you will literally feel as if the car around you fits as a glove.

    Good luck!!