Is Subway Real Food?

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    Sep 22, 2013 4:28 AM GMT
    Subway is the single largest chain restaurant in the world. That means you’ve probably eaten there at some point in your lifetime and if you are like me could possibly have 10 of these restaurants within a 1 mile radius of your house.

    But is eating at America’s favorite fast food chain really eating real food?

    SubwaySandwiches.jpg

    Subway would certainly like you to think so. With their slogan “Eat Fresh,” marketing with avocados and a guy who lost hundreds of pounds eating their famous sub sandwiches, it’s easy to get duped.

    You may also feel tricked when you see a little heart logo, indicating a menu item at Subway is “heart healthy.” Just last week it was announced that the American Heart Association (AHA) has endorsed several menu items at Subway and added the heart logo to indicate which ones.

    At every Subway on the “sneeze guard” glass they display one version of their nutritional information – the infamous “6 grams of fat or less” menu. This menu includes calories, fat grams, and that new little heart logo, but doesn’t display anything about the ingredients. Doubting that Subway or the AHA would actually ever create a real food information guide for you, I decided it was time to do this myself. Below are the “6 grams or less” menu items and critical real food information you should know about each choice.

    Let’s take a closer look

    Subway definitely keeps it fresh and I figured out how. Every single one of their items on the “6 grams or less” menu has preservatives to keep it …well…fresh! Sure Subway makes your meal right in front of you, but what is really happening behind the scenes? Boxes of already cut up and prepackaged processed foods and chemical additives are being shipped from Big Food industry factories to each location.

    The 9 grain wheat bread might look and smell freshly baked but it contains close to 50 ingredients including refined flours, dough conditioners, hidden MSG, refined sugars, etc. Could bread this processed ever be real food? Certainly not, when it includes a chemical ingredient called azodicarbonamide, which is banned as a food additive in the U.K., Europe, and Australia, and if you get caught using it in Singapore you can get up to 15 years in prison and be fined $450,000. Azodicarbonamide is more commonly used in the production of foamed plastics, however, it is allowed in the United States as a food additive, a flour bleaching agent, and a dough conditioner that improves elasticity of bread. The U.K. has recognized this ingredient as a potential cause of asthma if inhaled, and advises against its use in people who have sensitivity to food dye allergies and other common allergies in food, because azodicarbonamide can exacerbate the symptoms. Let’s not forget it only takes 4 or 5 simple ingredients to make REAL whole-wheat bread including flour, yeast, salt, water, and maybe honey.

    Three sandwiches on this menu, along with several other menu items not listed, are comprised of processed meats and filled with nitrates and forms of MSG. The consumption of nitrates need to be taken very seriously. Nitrates are frequently converted into nitrosamines, which have been proven to increase the risk of disease dramatically. The latest research from World Cancer Research Funddeclared that “processed meat is too dangerous for human consumption.” Studies have shown it may only take 1.8 ounces of processed meat (about half of what is in a typical 6 inch sub) daily to increase the likelihood of cancer by 50%, heart disease by 42% and diabetes by 19%. I still know people who eat Subway for lunch everyday, but I’m glad I don’t know anyone on the actual Subway Diet. Sheesh. I can’t imagine what their percentage would be, could you?
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    Sep 22, 2013 4:35 AM GMT
    Because most cold cuts and processed meats are high in nitrates and chemicals and bread is, well, bread, I've always considered Subway junk food, even without cheese. Plus compared to regular delis, pre-proportioned, thinly sliced and in the case of the chicken breast reconstituted-looking meats look like the kind of stuff you'd pack a kid's lunchbox with. But I do enjoy a $5 footlong every month. I think the point is as an alternative to filling up on fries customers can load up on vegetable toppings - though I wouldn't be surprised if they too were loaded with sodium.
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    Sep 22, 2013 4:44 AM GMT
    I've been cooking at home a lot more lately and I feel 100% better for it.
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    Sep 29, 2013 4:11 PM GMT
    I stay far away from deli meat. Though I suppose the tuna salad is "safe enough."
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    Sep 29, 2013 5:31 PM GMT
    SeanHamilton saidI stay far away from deli meat. Though I suppose the tuna salad is "safe enough."


    Mercury be damned! icon_lol.gif
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    Sep 29, 2013 5:36 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    But is eating at America’s favorite fast food chain really eating real food?

    Wouldn't it be fair to cite the link where you found this piece to post here? I'm sure some of us would like to know the source of this anti-Subway article you uploaded, with graph. Then we would have a better ability to evaluate the truthfulness of these claims, and if there are counter-claims to consider.

    I mean, imagine if the source was some far-out wacko site that promoted holistic healing in place of mainstream medicine, and other unproven theories?
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    Sep 29, 2013 7:25 PM GMT
    Preservatives can't be all bad for you. I just turned 50 and people still think I'm 36. icon_wink.gif
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    Sep 29, 2013 7:27 PM GMT
    I can't take any article seriously that uses the term "chemical additives". It's such a loaded and nebulous term used to demonize things that may not even be harmful at all in the permitted doses. But since it's a CHEMICAL (ZOMG!!!) and since it's added (ie. it's not NATURAL (OMGWTFBBQ!!!!)), it MUST be harmful. Or at the very least, things containing it aren't "REAL food" (another nebulous and arbitrary term). icon_rolleyes.gif

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    Sep 29, 2013 7:37 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    Scruffypup said
    But is eating at America’s favorite fast food chain really eating real food?

    Wouldn't it be fair to cite the link where you found this piece to post here? I'm sure some of us would like to know the source of this anti-Subway article you uploaded, with graph. Then we would have a better ability to evaluate the truthfulness of these claims, and if there are counter-claims to consider.

    I mean, imagine if the source was some far-out wacko site that promoted holistic healing in place of mainstream medicine, and other unproven theories?


    Here: http://foodbabe.com/2012/06/12/is-subway-real-food/

    We found subway food had a peculiar smell about it. So no thanks. We also found food-safe care nearly non-existent. There's really no point to wearing those gloves if, while in the middle of making a sandwich, you are going handle cash with them on. O.o
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    Sep 29, 2013 7:40 PM GMT
    It is "sub-real"...a lower form of surreal. It masquerades as food.
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    Sep 29, 2013 7:47 PM GMT
    meninlove said
    ART_DECO said
    Scruffypup said
    But is eating at America’s favorite fast food chain really eating real food?

    Wouldn't it be fair to cite the link where you found this piece to post here? I'm sure some of us would like to know the source of this anti-Subway article you uploaded, with graph. Then we would have a better ability to evaluate the truthfulness of these claims, and if there are counter-claims to consider.

    I mean, imagine if the source was some far-out wacko site that promoted holistic healing in place of mainstream medicine, and other unproven theories?


    Here: http://foodbabe.com/2012/06/12/is-subway-real-food/

    We found subway food had a peculiar smell about it. So no thanks. We also found food-safe care nearly non-existent. There's really no point to wearing those gloves if, while in the middle of making a sandwich, you are going handle cash with them on. O.o

    Though interestingly the chart may have originated at -

    http://www.undergroundhealth.com/

    The relationship between these 2 sites is not clear. But each has an ideological agenda, which I distrust.

    When I see more objective information about Subway I'll make a decision. But if they're correct, then little of what we eat in the US is healthy.
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    Sep 29, 2013 7:55 PM GMT
    Subway is an ok alternative to other fast food. All processed food has preservatives. If you want fresh, then go to a real deli that slices the meats in house. This article is just sensationalist bullshit.
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    Sep 29, 2013 8:06 PM GMT
    xrichx saidSubway is an ok alternative to other fast food. All processed food has preservatives. If you want fresh, then go to a real deli that slices the meats in house. This article is just sensationalist bullshit.


    But...but...This is RealJock!? icon_lol.gif
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    Sep 29, 2013 8:33 PM GMT
    xrichx saidSubway is an ok alternative to other fast food. All processed food has preservatives. If you want fresh, then go to a real deli that slices the meats in house. This article is just sensationalist bullshit.

    +1
  • Rhi_Bran

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    Oct 09, 2013 12:23 PM GMT
    Whenever I do subway I avoid the deli meats and get the chicken teriyaki with loads of spinach and onions.