If You Knew You Could Not Fail

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    Nov 23, 2008 11:58 PM GMT
    I feel chickenshit and broke, but have ambitions of owning my own personal training/massage therapy studio, with pilates on the reformer, boot camp, Zumba. group training, etc. This is what I would do if I knew I could not fail. What would you do? Inspire me, or give me small business advice...please!
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    Nov 24, 2008 12:04 AM GMT
    Begin a carbonated milk company
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    Nov 24, 2008 12:12 AM GMT
    Great advice, thanks! But, I should add that I'm well educated and highly certified in all areas that I mentioned. Just not-so-much in milk carbonation.
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    Nov 24, 2008 12:18 AM GMT
    debussy81 saidBegin a carbonated milk company


    you can't really carbonate milk, it would slit because of the acid contents.
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    Nov 24, 2008 12:24 AM GMT
    lilTanker said
    debussy81 saidBegin a carbonated milk company


    you can't really carbonate milk, it would slit because of the acid contents.


    Great guys...this is my first post and we're getting a science lesson. I should've asked the Ukranian Professor (one of my boyfriends) for the answer, lol.
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    Nov 24, 2008 12:47 AM GMT
    Kefir is semi carbonated. It's possible don't worry.
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    Nov 24, 2008 1:23 AM GMT
    i don't know anything about the business stuffs, and don't have any work experience at all. but i do know is if you truly believe in yourself, and really want to make your dream come true. just do it in baby step, then learning all the experiences on the way to the expert step. i can tell you where to start the baby step:

    1. find out the info on "business permit" to open a shop, or maybe you won't need it. but best way is to ask a lawyer, cuz they MUST know about it.
    2. shop's location must be visible, and on a well-known street.
    3. total amounts (finances, bargain, tax) for the whole processes such as remodel, new/used equipments, materials, new/used electronics, advertisements, salary, insurance, etc.

    that's all i know, so good luck and don't give up. i have my own dream to pursue, too. icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 24, 2008 1:24 AM GMT
    Well, you could find someone to bankroll your operation or you could start small and grow from there. I once knew a bunch of guys who couldn't afford membership to the fancy racquet club where I lived, but by pooling their cash, about ten guys were able to rent an old garage and start their own gym with very little money.

    You can't know that you won't fail, but you can assume it. Without risk, there's no reward.

    BTW: I took ten credits of dairy and food microbiology in college. Fermenting milk in its many ways is really fun, and you can eat the rewards. Let me know if you need QC.
  • imperator

    Posts: 626

    Nov 24, 2008 3:59 AM GMT
    trainerkp said[...]This is what I would do if I knew I could not fail. [...]


    Ultimately, you can't "fail" until either a) you're dead, or b) you let your dream die. You might try and not succeed, but as long as you're alive and you haven't given up on your idea, the worst you can suffer is a deferral of success; you can always keep trying again. You might find a hundred ways that don't work before you find the one that does, learn from each of them. And even when and if you get what you want, always keep in mind that success is no more final than failure. Appreciate your success when it comes, but don't get any more attached to it than you do the setbacks.

    As for the business advice part, I know woefully little, so I'll just say what my dad always said: "location, location, location."
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:06 AM GMT
    trainerkp saidI feel chickenshit and broke, but have ambitions of owning my own personal training/massage therapy studio, with pilates on the reformer, boot camp, Zumba. group training, etc. This is what I would do if I knew I could not fail. What would you do? Inspire me, or give me small business advice...please!


    Contact your local Small Business Administration (SBA) - the SBA helps people start, build and grow businesses.

    Check out their website: http://www.sba.gov/aboutsba/index.html
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:16 AM GMT
    How about retreats? Resorts and whatnot?

    As imperator said though; location, location, location. It's all about location.
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:22 AM GMT
    Your profile says you are a certified trainer in about a dozen things, so it sounds like you have the knowledge to run the services in a gym. But how much do you know about the business end of the industry? Perhaps you could benefit by going into business with someone with a better understanding of that part of it if yours is lacking.

    There is a pretty limited gym that does great business in this town because they have phenomenal marketing.
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:26 AM GMT
    If I knew I could not fail, I'd build a rocket and go to the Moon
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:27 AM GMT
    trainerkp saidI feel chickenshit and broke, but have ambitions of owning my own personal training/massage therapy studio, with pilates on the reformer, boot camp, Zumba. group training, etc. This is what I would do if I knew I could not fail. What would you do? Inspire me, or give me small business advice...please!


    You mention you don't have a lot of money, but what about working with a business coach? There are a lot of things about owning and running your own business that only an experienced person will know. If you aren't able to hire a business coach, what about finding a mentor who has successfully accomplished what it is you wish to accomplish? This can be invaluable, and you'll learn the tried and true methods for starting your own business.
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:32 AM GMT
    RyFit said

    You mention you don't have a lot of money, but what about working with a business coach? There are a lot of things about owning and running your own business that only an experienced person will know. If you aren't able to hire a business coach, what about finding a mentor who has successfully accomplished what it is you wish to accomplish? This can be invaluable, and you'll learn the tried and true methods for starting your own business.


    This is exactly what the SBA is set up to do... icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 24, 2008 4:51 AM GMT
    Craigslist. Search these businesses in your area, get ideas, and advertise. Stay away from Missed Connections.
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    Nov 24, 2008 5:07 AM GMT
    autofelatio ;)
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    Nov 24, 2008 5:13 AM GMT
    My PT just started his own studio. He got quite a offer that enabled him to do it. I share this just in case it might spark any ideas for you.

    A large apt complex in the area ....one with lots of amenties like swimming pool, workout room, half-court basketball court, etc. asked him to design their health routine/workout plan (I am not sure exactly what they call it)...anyway, he was given one of the commercial "storefronts" that they have to have a studio. So by teaming up with them, he was able to get his "starter" studio going.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Nov 24, 2008 7:59 AM GMT
    I have no business training at all, so this is just a layperson's perspective:

    If you're just starting out, and aren't a Walton or somesuch, you're not going to have the funds to compete with the big chains on things like size, hours, and probably even equipment. That means to compete, you'll need a niche market. Why not go for the idea of a gym where people are held to a higher standard of behavior?

    There are a large number of threads on this site detailing what the guys here dislike about their gyms, and it's probably safe to assume that the things guys here dislike are the same things that most regular gym patrons dislike: people hogging multiple pieces of equipment when it's busy, people not reracking their weights, people leaving dumbbells all over the place, people carrying on loud cellphone conversations and not actually using the piece of equipment their tying up, and people not wiping down the sweat when they're done with a piece of equipment. Prepare a list of expectations for your patrons. Give this to them as a handout when they sign up, and stress the importance of living up to these standards. Post signs near the equipment reminding people what's expected of them. Consider a deal where if people sign up for X number of months at once, you'll give them a free session to evaluate their current fitness level and make a plan for how to reach their goals--and in that session, emphasize the importance of reracking the weights, not claiming 3 sets of dumbbells at once, etc.

    Admittedly, the people who would be most drawn to such a gym are not the most profitable gym members. Gyms earn a great profit from people who buy a membership and never show up, where this would attract people who show up regularly. On the other hand, if the culture of this behavior caught on at your gym, you'd probably end up with very strong loyalty from your customer base, and a stable customer base seems like something that would be more important in a small business than in a large one, as you'll need to make ends meet and won't have a large cash reserve to deal with huge fluctuations.

    As for the group classes, they're a nice amenity, but it's hard to build a gym's clientele around them. Having highly qualified people running a large number of group exercise classes can be nice, but it's important to recognize that most people won't rearrange their schedule to make an exercise class. If you don't offer the class they want at the time they want it, they'll just not participate.

    Keep the place clean, keep the behavioral standards high, and keep the contracts simple and clear, and I bet there will be a core set of patrons who will gladly ditch the large chains if they find out about you.
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    Dec 03, 2008 1:18 PM GMT
    You guys rock! Thanks!
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    Dec 03, 2008 1:53 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd said
    If you're just starting out, and aren't a Walton or somesuch, you're not going to have the funds to compete with the big chains on things like size, hours, and probably even equipment. That means to compete, you'll need a niche market. Why not go for the idea of a gym where people are held to a higher standard of behavior?


    Actually Sam Walton started with nothing. Now his heirs together are worth more than either Warren Buffet or Bill Gates. But certainly exploiting a niche market, and some of the other suggestions made here, all have merit. Now trainerkp needs to focus on only one or a few that best meet his specific & unique needs.

    I endorse the recommendation to consult with the Small Business Administration (SBA). They not only are a resource themselves, but can point to others, as well. They can show how to create a "business model" which investors require. Not sure how effective the Gainesville area office will be, but here's the SBA national web site:

    http://www.sba.gov/

    Getting individuals interested who have investment money to risk would solve a great deal of the start-up cost challenges, especially since US banks have withdrawn much of their credit capital in recent months, as we all know. And this may be a tough market to get into right now, many people lacking the money to cover their own essentials, much less such "luxuries" as personal training & massage. Location may be a big factor in finding clientele with disposable income.

    If it isn't possible for trainerkp to begin his own business at this time, at least he should look to work with some similar established business. This does several things:

    1. Provides income, that can be saved later for the future business.
    2. Keeps him current & knowledgeable in his field.
    3. Builds a resume to attract both future clients, and investment capital, from individuals and/or lending institutions.
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    Dec 03, 2008 2:46 PM GMT
    if i knew i couldn't fail i'd ask half the men of realjock out on a date! greedy, me? icon_lol.gif
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Dec 03, 2008 4:11 PM GMT
    If I knew I could not fail, I would return to college and get a degree in Industrial Design.