Metric vs Imperial

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:14 AM GMT
    Why cant Americans do metric? Americans insist on Fahrenheit scale. Actually in general people cant do metric.
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:23 AM GMT
    Why do speed limit signs in Britain use miles instead of kilometers? icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:25 AM GMT
    Because they are exceptional.

    Secretly yearning to be British.

    Because they can.

    Using metric would make to much sense.






    We just have to tell the men that their dicks would be more than twice the size...
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Sep 30, 2013 12:29 AM GMT
    bhp91126 saidUsing metric would make to much sense.


    Yes.
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:37 AM GMT
    US+measures.jpg
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:38 AM GMT
    Anybody who measures things for a living uses SI units.

    Except... the construction industry! Using archaic imperial units (quick, add 8 and 5/16 of 1/12 to 4 and 2/3 of 5/12) allows a construction crew to spend days building and then correcting errors in something that otherwise might take hours. More labor hours, more union dues, and bigger mortgage payments to the wall street swindlers. Everybody's happy!
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:43 AM GMT
    JasFriedman saidWhy cant Americans do metric? Americans insist on Fahrenheit scale. Actually in general people cant do metric.


    Because we are a bunch of arrogant assholes who think the rest of the world should bend over backwards to make life easier for us?

    Actually, now that I think about it, almost everything in the US is in metric units, along with the English units (you'll find both on almost all products). Problem is that we still don't know what most of it means beyond a liter.
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    Sep 30, 2013 10:14 AM GMT
    strokeme220 said
    JasFriedman saidWhy cant Americans do metric? Americans insist on Fahrenheit scale. Actually in general people cant do metric.


    Because we are a bunch of arrogant assholes who think the rest of the world should bend over backwards to make life easier for us?

    Actually, now that I think about it, almost everything in the US is in metric units, along with the English units (you'll find both on almost all products). Problem is that we still don't know what most of it means beyond a liter.


    I think we are gradually moving into the metric system worldwide.

    David3000 saidUS+measures.jpg


    LOL!

    xrichx saidWhy do speed limit signs in Britain use miles instead of kilometers? icon_rolleyes.gif


    I would like it to be in kilometers, but it's probably to do with car-makers? Still, the metric system is better in terms of its scientific usage. I think it's better to use one or the other. This is one reason people fail at mathematics because using the metric system you need less to remember. Metric deals with powers of ten and you just need to know the prefix: nanometre or femtometre. But in reality you only need kilometre, millimetre, centimetre etc. With Imperial units you need to know various conversions.
  • somedaytoo

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    Sep 30, 2013 10:19 AM GMT
    Because we don't like it and we can decide for ourselves how we like to measure things. We're not looking for approval from the rest of the world.
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    Sep 30, 2013 10:27 AM GMT
    [quote]I would like it to be in kilometers, but it's probably to do with car-makers? [/quote]

    I don't think that's the reason. Car makers make cars with imperial for the rest of europe anyway.
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    Sep 30, 2013 10:48 AM GMT
    Many things in the US have gone metric, especially mechanicals, like most of the fasteners on US cars. But temperature measurements don't have to match up with too many other things in daily life.

    And as the charts above show, in the range between which water freezes and boils is 180 degree steps in Fahrenheit, but only 100 in Celsius, a coarser measurement. I find degrees in Fahrenheit gives me a better feel for temperature than Celsius, especially of the air on my skin.

    It's argued that 0 C for water freezing and 100 C for water boiling is more logical, and easier to remember. But that's only at sea level standard barometric pressure. Those numbers are different in Denver, or even in Fargo, ND, due to higher elevation. Water may actually boil at 98 C where you live, so that's the number you must remember (the freezing point is less affected by altitude, and remains close to 0 C for most everyday purposes).

    I don't find it very challenging to remember that 32 F to 212 F is water's range at sea level. And I really have no need to coordinate temperature with other metric measurements. Plus most US citizens have gotten used to the convenient comfort range that Fahrenheit gives us, for example: 60s is cool but tolerable; 70s is comfortable, especially as an indoor range; 80s is getting warm, nice for many outdoor activities; 90s are hot, use caution; over 100 can be dangerous.
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    Sep 30, 2013 10:51 AM GMT
    somedaytoo saidBecause we don't like it and we can decide for ourselves how we like to measure things. We're not looking for approval from the rest of the world.


    You see, that's the problem with Americans. It's not about approval. It's about using standard units so everyone can agree. It's not about liking it either. It's about setting a standard so everyone knows what quantity is what otherwise we have disagreements everywhere.
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    Sep 30, 2013 10:53 AM GMT
    ART_DECO saidMany things in the US have gone metric, especially mechanicals, like most of the fasteners on US cars. But temperature measurements don't have to match up with too many other things in daily life.

    And as the charts above show, in the range between which water freezes and boils is 180 degree steps in Fahrenheit, but only 100 in Celsius, a coarser measurement. I find degrees in Fahrenheit gives me a better feel for temperature than Celsius, especially of the air on my skin.

    It's argued that 0 C for water freezing and 100 C for water boiling is more logical, and easier to remember. But that's only at sea level standard barometric pressure. Those numbers are different in Denver, or even in Fargo, ND, due to higher elevation. Water may actually boil at 98 C where you live, so that's the number you must remember (the freezing point is less affected by altitude, and remains close to 0 C for most everyday purposes).

    I don't find it very challenging to remember that 32 F to 212 F is water's range at sea level. And I really have no need to coordinate temperature with other metric measurements. Plus most US citizens have gotten used to the convenient comfort range that Fahrenheit gives us, for example: 60s is cool but tolerable; 70s is comfortable, especially as an indoor range; 80s is getting warm, nice for many outdoor activities; 90s are hot, use caution; over 100 can be dangerous.





    You say that about Celsius.
    0-10 is cold
    10-20 is tolerable
    20-30 is warm
    30-40 is hot
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    Sep 30, 2013 10:59 AM GMT
    The Americans would do well if they changed to metric status. Why?
    The advancement of science. The advancement of engineering. The advancement of understanding of literacy.
    Seriously.

    The Americans expect every other country to adopt Imperial units. The majority uses Metric now.

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    Sep 30, 2013 11:01 AM GMT
    JasFriedman saidWhy cant Americans do metric? Americans insist on Fahrenheit scale. Actually in general people cant do metric.


    I'm American, and I hate the imperial system. It's ridiculously and unnecessarily complex. We need to get on board with the rest of the world. It's insanity.
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    Sep 30, 2013 11:08 AM GMT
    JasFriedman said
    You say that about Celsius.
    0-10 is cold (32-50 F)
    10-20 is tolerable (50-68 F)
    20-30 is warm (68-86 F)
    30-40 is hot (86-104 F)

    Those Celsius temperature ranges by 10s equal 18-degree jumps in Fahrenheit. I prefer the more subtle degree changes in F.

    And for what practical human purpose must temperature be based on 100 degrees of range? Because it sounds tidy to scientists? Seems as arbitrary to me as Fahrenheit.

    Why not make 200 C the boiling point of water? That would provide a 200-degree range, similar to Fahrenheit's 180, from water freezing to boiling. I prefer a system of temperature that's more human-based, not lab-based. And it has nothing to do with Americans versus the world.
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    Sep 30, 2013 11:11 AM GMT
    JasFriedman saidThe Americans would do well if they changed to metric status. Why?
    The advancement of science. The advancement of engineering. The advancement of understanding of literacy.
    Seriously.

    The Americans expect every other country to adopt Imperial units. The majority uses Metric now.



    No. The Americans don't. Many of us believe that metric makes more sense, but we live in a country that decided, for whatever rebellious reason, to not go with that system.

    Other countries rebel and choose different systems as well - political, social castes, currencies.

    Why don't you start making hasty generalizations about those countries?
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    Sep 30, 2013 11:19 AM GMT
    It would be cool if the US would change that. But the changing can be quite difficult. I remember a plane crashed in Canada when they changed from gallons to litters because the guy who put the kerosene in the plane read the quantity in gallons whereas it was in litters (or the opposite, I don't remember), and the plane went out of fuel when it was in the air.
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    Sep 30, 2013 11:34 AM GMT
    It's really funny how there's never a thread to bash other countries.

    We're like the Kanye West of the Earth. They talk shit about us all the time, yet they keep us in the spotlight with all the free publicity.
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    Sep 30, 2013 11:41 AM GMT
    I also find it curious that it was the United States that introduced one of the world's first world's first decimal currencies in the 18th Century, breaking away from the irregular British system of pounds, shillings & pense. A monetary system the UK kept until just a few decades ago. And there are guys here who still list their weight in stones. Try to figure THAT one. Or measure a horse's size in hands.

    So I don't think this should entirely be a tirade against the US. And as I noted above, many of our mechanicals have been metric for years now, especially on items for export. You need metric tools to work on a recent US car, inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today.

    But if we're more comfortable with Fahrenheit for our temperature, or miles per hour on our roads, as we tick off the distance in miles, what concern is that of others from outside our borders? Europe had to rebuild itself twice in the previous century, and could choose to standardize such things among its many countries, and colonies.

    The US has had a stable industrial infrastructure for its entire history, except for the South in the first decades following the Civil War. On the basis that you don't fix what isn't broken, and what still works quite well with an immense installed base, there are things metric I don't think we need or miss at all. These criticisms sound to me more like fashion speaking than essential practicality in our daily US lives.
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:14 PM GMT
    ART_DECO saidI also find it curious that it was the United States that introduced one of the world's first world's first decimal currencies in the 18th Century, breaking away from the irregular British system of pounds, shillings & pense. A monetary system the UK kept until just a few decades ago. And there are guys here who still list their weight in stones. Try to figure THAT one. Or measure a horse's size in hands.

    So I don't think this should entirely be a tirade against the US. And as I noted above, many of our mechanicals have been metric for years now, especially on items for export. You need metric tools to work on a recent US car, inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today.

    But if we're more comfortable with Fahrenheit for our temperature, or miles per hour on our roads, as we tick off the distance in miles, what concern is that of others from outside our borders? Europe had to rebuild itself twice in the previous century, and could choose to standardize such things among its many countries, and colonies.

    The US has had a stable industrial infrastructure for its entire history, except for the South in the first decades following the Civil War. On the basis that you don't fix what isn't broken, and what still works quite well with an immense installed base, there are things metric I don't think we need or miss at all. These criticisms sound to me more like fashion speaking than essential practicality in our daily US lives.


    "inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today."

    Wonder what's in my toolbox?
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:20 PM GMT
    I use metric as well. Very exciting BTW.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

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    Sep 30, 2013 12:24 PM GMT
    I think a lot of us would be more than happy to use metric.
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:42 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    ART_DECO said
    ...And as I noted above, many of our mechanicals have been metric for years now, especially on items for export. You need metric tools to work on a recent US car, inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today.

    "inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today."

    Wonder what's in my toolbox?

    A BFH (big fucking hammer) as my auto mechanics instructor used to call it, vise grips and some WD-40?

    But I would imagine both inch and metric sizes in your toolbox. I have almost entirely metric in mine. Not that I do a lot of work on cars anymore, but my American-made bicycles have been metric for years, along with other items around the house.

    So this notion that the US is still using nothing but inch sizes is erroneous. Where we tend to retain the older measurements is in personal domestic products & applications, like clothing sizes, interior residential dimensions, and of course for men, dick size. It isn't often you hear a man bragging about how many centimeters he's got. icon_wink.gif
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    Sep 30, 2013 12:52 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    freedomisntfree said
    ART_DECO said
    ...And as I noted above, many of our mechanicals have been metric for years now, especially on items for export. You need metric tools to work on a recent US car, inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today.

    "inch sizes only fitting cars falling into the classic/vintage category today."

    Wonder what's in my toolbox?

    A BFH (big fucking hammer) as my auto mechanics instructor used to call it, vise grips and some WD-40?

    But I would imagine both inch and metric sizes in your toolbox. I have almost entirely metric in mine. Not that I do a lot of work on cars anymore, but my American-made bicycles have been metric for years, along with other items around the house.

    So this notion that the US is still using nothing but inch sizes is erroneous. Where we tend to retain the older measurements is in personal domestic products & applications, like clothing sizes, interior residential dimensions, and of course for men, dick size. It isn't often you hear a man bragging about how many centimeters he's got. icon_wink.gif


    Actually, I have very complete metrics in my big Kennedy roll around box, but that's up at my storage unit. It's mostly SAE here at the house.

    My many Cannondales have been all metric as the only thing that 'was' American made was the frame. Plus, my newer American cars have been mostly metric, but I really haven't had to do anything on those.

    Tinkering with the old cars is one of the nicest forms of relaxation for me.