DNA Testing for Health

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 30, 2013 1:33 AM GMT
    I read an interesting article on Men's Journal on three companies (23and me, Inherent Health, Pathway Genomics) that are providing DNA testing to profile your probability for different health conditions. Pathway Genomics even includes a fitness panel so that you can customize your workout according to your DNA! The costs of these DNA tests is only $99!

    Has anyone tried any of these services? Are they overhyped? What are your thoughts?
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    Sep 30, 2013 1:40 AM GMT
    I think it's as reliable as going to a fortune teller.

    We've come a long way in genetic research/engineering. But for $99, I don't think you'll get an accurate prediction of your future health or longevity.

    Someday life will imitate art. Just not today.

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  • TheBizMan

    Posts: 4091

    Sep 30, 2013 1:53 AM GMT
    "Testing your DNA" is somewhat vague.

    Are you talking about getting your personal genome sequenced? That has some actual promise in allowing people to understand their risks for disease and cancer.
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    Oct 04, 2013 11:38 AM GMT
    Yes, I meant having my DNA sequenced. I actually wanted to do it for my parents as well since doctors are asking them to take a cocktail of medicines for different ailments.
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    Oct 04, 2013 6:11 PM GMT
    Given today's insurance environment, I'd only consider it anonymously, not even with implied nor with any sort of guaranteed anonymity in the form of withholding information from the public, but rather I'd only allow it if the testing could be administered and the results provided with no identifying markers whatsoever other than an untraceable, randomly generated number. And even then, not only wouldn't I want my name in the doctor's appointment book for that test nor for the results, not only wouldn't I want results mailed to my home address, but also I'd only pay in cash, not a check, not a credit card. Nothing that ties for the insurance companies that information with this person.
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    Oct 10, 2013 8:33 AM GMT
    theantijock saidGiven today's insurance environment, I'd only consider it anonymously, not even with implied nor with any sort of guaranteed anonymity in the form of withholding information from the public, but rather I'd only allow it if the testing could be administered and the results provided with no identifying markers whatsoever other than an untraceable, randomly generated number. And even then, not only wouldn't I want my name in the doctor's appointment book for that test nor for the results, not only wouldn't I want results mailed to my home address, but also I'd only pay in cash, not a check, not a credit card. Nothing that ties for the insurance companies that information with this person.


    Isn't this considered a bit of an extreme position? Don't privacy/digital record acts protect you?
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    Oct 10, 2013 8:39 AM GMT
    marcobruno1978 said
    Isn't this considered a bit of an extreme position? Don't privacy/digital record acts protect you?
    I don't think HIPAA really applies here.
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    Oct 10, 2013 3:00 PM GMT
    marcobruno1978 saidIsn't this considered a bit of an extreme position? Don't privacy/digital record acts protect you?


    Does the jury ever really disregard that last statement?

    Sadly, sometimes what should seem extreme might be realistic. A privacy act today guarantees neither now (information leaks, stolen, etc.) nor privacy 20 years from now and I can't tell in what direction this country is moving. Do privacy rights seem to be gaining ground? Do insurance companies already pick and choose and charge accordingly? Will Obamacare survive intact?

    And how relevant is that information anyway? Probably some DNA testing might help make a plan while the rest of it might just be a cofactor which only kicks in according to environment & practices, so how valuable is that information if you are already doing what you are supposed to be doing? Is what little tweaking you might be able to do worth the risk of being discriminated against in your future?

    Anonymous testing seems to solve for now those issues so what might seem extreme might be practical.