Powerlifting and hernia


  • Oct 01, 2013 5:08 PM GMT
    I do powerlifting. I was diagnosed with spinal hernia, the doctor said, it was incurable, but not serios. He recommended to avoid doing squats and deadlifts.

    I do leg press, bent-over rows, hyperextensions and pullups (with extra weight) instead. My weights are growing, but i'm not absolutely sure that it is enough, because the deadlift and the squat are indispensable, they make the whole body work.

    Does anyone have the same problem?

    PS. sorry for my English, i'm not a native-speakericon_rolleyes.gif
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    Oct 02, 2013 9:53 PM GMT
    Ouch! I never heard of a spinal hernia but I am sure it's no fun at all. I had a "regular" hernia a few years ago and had to have an operation for it.
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    Oct 03, 2013 4:27 AM GMT
    Question: Are you able to perform squats and deadlifts with NO WEIGHT?
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Oct 03, 2013 6:13 AM GMT
    I second the idea that you should consult with a sports medicine doctor who specializes in orthopedics and knows weight lifting routines. As much as you may want to lift, taking care of yourself is the top priority. You certainly don't want to do anything that will leave you in bad shape in the future.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Oct 03, 2013 7:46 AM GMT
    SeanHamilton saidOuch! I never heard of a spinal hernia but I am sure it's no fun at all. I had a "regular" hernia a few years ago and had to have an operation for it.


    Sounds like he herniated a disc in his back, as opposed to a groin hernia. Both are possible.icon_idea.gif

    Get a second opinion.icon_idea.gif

  • Oct 03, 2013 11:24 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidQuestion: Are you able to perform squats and deadlifts with NO WEIGHT?


    Yes, I am, but how could it help?
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    Oct 04, 2013 4:19 AM GMT
    arschlochsschlosser said
    Scruffypup saidQuestion: Are you able to perform squats and deadlifts with NO WEIGHT?


    Yes, I am, but how could it help?



    First of all, I'm not a doctor and I'm not giving you advice, but I will tell you my story. I have a torn disc. I was told by every doctor that I saw to never do squats or deadlifts again. So for years I reluctantly followed their advice. But there was this trainer at my gym who would frequently look at me and shake his head and say "I could help you if you'd just let me." I asked what he would have me do. He said "squats and deadlifts." I said "forget it, that's the very things my doctors and physical therapists told me not to do." He would then explain to me how most doctors didn't know a thing about the back and how to strengthen it. He said they tell people that because they don't want to get into a lawsuit if someone hurts themselves in the gym. For 4 years, I dismissed this guy and hobbled in pain to the isolation machines. Then one day I said "fine, but if you hurt me I'm going to sue your pants off." He just laughed at me and I started training with him." At first he just had me doing Air Squats with no weight at all. He explained that if you can do a full squat or deadlift with no weight, there is no reason you can't gradually add weight. The first few weeks my back was very tight because I had basically turned into a veal calf. But after about 3 weeks, I started to feel that "good soreness" in my back. To date, this is the only thing that keeps me pain free. I do have flare-ups from time to time but I'm so much better than before. I wish I had listened to him much earlier.

  • Oct 04, 2013 8:53 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    arschlochsschlosser said
    Scruffypup saidQuestion: Are you able to perform squats and deadlifts with NO WEIGHT?


    Yes, I am, but how could it help?



    First of all, I'm not a doctor and I'm not giving you advice, but I will tell you my story. I have a torn disc. I was told by every doctor that I saw to never do squats or deadlifts again. So for years I reluctantly followed their advice. But there was this trainer at my gym who would frequently look at me and shake his head and say "I could help you if you'd just let me." I asked what he would have me do. He said "squats and deadlifts." I said "forget it, that's the very things my doctors and physical therapists told me not to do." He would then explain to me how most doctors didn't know a thing about the back and how to strengthen it. He said they tell people that because they don't want to get into a lawsuit if someone hurts themselves in the gym. For 4 years, I dismissed this guy and hobbled in pain to the isolation machines. Then one day I said "fine, but if you hurt me I'm going to sue your pants off." He just laughed at me and I started training with him." At first he just had me doing Air Squats with no weight at all. He explained that if you can do a full squat or deadlift with no weight, there is no reason you can't gradually add weight. The first few weeks my back was very tight because I had basically turned into a veal calf. But after about 3 weeks, I started to feel that "good soreness" in my back. To date, this is the only thing that keeps me pain free. I do have flare-ups from time to time but I'm so much better than before. I wish I had listened to him much earlier.


    How did you add the weight and how much?
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    Oct 04, 2013 10:24 PM GMT
    arschlochsschlosser said
    Scruffypup said
    arschlochsschlosser said
    Scruffypup saidQuestion: Are you able to perform squats and deadlifts with NO WEIGHT?


    Yes, I am, but how could it help?



    First of all, I'm not a doctor and I'm not giving you advice, but I will tell you my story. I have a torn disc. I was told by every doctor that I saw to never do squats or deadlifts again. So for years I reluctantly followed their advice. But there was this trainer at my gym who would frequently look at me and shake his head and say "I could help you if you'd just let me." I asked what he would have me do. He said "squats and deadlifts." I said "forget it, that's the very things my doctors and physical therapists told me not to do." He would then explain to me how most doctors didn't know a thing about the back and how to strengthen it. He said they tell people that because they don't want to get into a lawsuit if someone hurts themselves in the gym. For 4 years, I dismissed this guy and hobbled in pain to the isolation machines. Then one day I said "fine, but if you hurt me I'm going to sue your pants off." He just laughed at me and I started training with him." At first he just had me doing Air Squats with no weight at all. He explained that if you can do a full squat or deadlift with no weight, there is no reason you can't gradually add weight. The first few weeks my back was very tight because I had basically turned into a veal calf. But after about 3 weeks, I started to feel that "good soreness" in my back. To date, this is the only thing that keeps me pain free. I do have flare-ups from time to time but I'm so much better than before. I wish I had listened to him much earlier.


    How did you add the weight and how much?



    Well, like I said.....I started out with Air Squats (meaning no weight at all.) So the goal here is high reps. If you haven't been doing anything in a while, even Air Squats can be challenging because of the high reps. I then held very light weights, like 3 pounds at first. The key is to work up so gradually that your body doesn't tighten up and give you pain. Again, I'm not recommending you do this, but this is what worked for me, and my trainer said he had helped a lot of people using this method. I now do CrossFit!

    The most important thing is to use perfect form, even on the light weights and to keep your ego out of it.
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    Oct 04, 2013 10:33 PM GMT
    Scruffypup said
    arschlochsschlosser said
    Scruffypup saidQuestion: Are you able to perform squats and deadlifts with NO WEIGHT?


    Yes, I am, but how could it help?



    First of all, I'm not a doctor and I'm not giving you advice, but I will tell you my story. I have a torn disc. I was told by every doctor that I saw to never do squats or deadlifts again. So for years I reluctantly followed their advice. But there was this trainer at my gym who would frequently look at me and shake his head and say "I could help you if you'd just let me." I asked what he would have me do. He said "squats and deadlifts." I said "forget it, that's the very things my doctors and physical therapists told me not to do." He would then explain to me how most doctors didn't know a thing about the back and how to strengthen it. He said they tell people that because they don't want to get into a lawsuit if someone hurts themselves in the gym. For 4 years, I dismissed this guy and hobbled in pain to the isolation machines. Then one day I said "fine, but if you hurt me I'm going to sue your pants off." He just laughed at me and I started training with him." At first he just had me doing Air Squats with no weight at all. He explained that if you can do a full squat or deadlift with no weight, there is no reason you can't gradually add weight. The first few weeks my back was very tight because I had basically turned into a veal calf. But after about 3 weeks, I started to feel that "good soreness" in my back. To date, this is the only thing that keeps me pain free. I do have flare-ups from time to time but I'm so much better than before. I wish I had listened to him much earlier.

    Listen to Scruffy. Chuck, who's had multiple back surgeries and continuing disk problems, went through EXACTLY the same thing..... and ultimately has benefitted in exactly the same way from a sensible, knowledgeable training routine by a smarter-then-the-neurosurgeons-and-physical-therapists sports trainer. It IS the only thing that keeps his back functional at a virtually pain-free level, and on the occasions he's sloughed-off, he pays the price in his back again. The neurosurgeon and physiatrists have actually now endorsed and agree that it's an essential part of his "maintenance" and has allayed some of the spinal deterioration he was experiencing.
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    Oct 04, 2013 10:37 PM GMT
    I always think back to the skeleton we had in science class. Remember how it had that metal pole that held it upright? You know why? Because without support, the skeleton would collapse upon itself. In a living human, our muscles work like that metal pole. You lose muscle tone and your spine begins collapsing on itself. This is why I keep my muscles as strong as possible. And don't let anyone tell you you need heavy weight to build muscle.