Trek vs Specialized....

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 15, 2007 6:44 PM GMT
    I've just about decided to go ahead and get a road bike and it seems Trek has the lock on this type (and Specialized is all about mtn biking). Anyone have thoughts about this or are they both just equally good?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 15, 2007 8:31 PM GMT
    I don't know if either one is truly better than the other. My first serious road bike was a Specialized Epic Allez (carbon) that I loved and it fit me perfectly (i had a specialized Stumpjumper -oversized steel- that also fit me perfect). But _fit_ is the key thing you should be looking at. All bikes have very subtle differences in geometry that can effect how the bike feels when you ride it. That plus the choice of material and construction play a role. Some people like carbon fiber bikes, others can't stand them because they don't feel as responsive as steel. Aluminum has a reputation for being stiff and unforgiving to ride (Cannondales and Klein bike being examples). I think the trek carbon bikes are great, if you got the cash. Some questions, what type of riding are planning on? Competitive? Triathlon's? Tooling around town? Do you want something really light weight or something that when you start a sprint won't feel noodly when you push really hard on the cranks? Do you like to ride stretched out or more upright? There are lots of great bikes out there, some very niche, Trek and Specialized just happen to be very prominent. My personal favourite bike would be a litespeed (if i had the funds for it)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 15, 2007 8:55 PM GMT
    Hey Gig -- I had a Mongoose, and a Trek. The trek 3700 wins my vote, hands down! It was the most awesome bike I ever rode. My son took it, so I'm going to get another ASAP!

    I got the aluminum frame, but this time, I think I'm going to get a carbon-composite frame. Lighter, if you have to carry it for some reason.

    God, I miss it SO badly!

    Steve
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 15, 2007 9:39 PM GMT
    Im actually working with the Hincapie brothers on a business venture(George races for the discovery team and was recently in the tour de france)...I can ask them if you'd like....I know nothing about bikes myself.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 15, 2007 10:23 PM GMT
    Wrustle, others, thanks for the feedback.

    I've been doing mainly mountain/trail biking and was really trying to decide if I wanted to upgrade to a full-suspension for trail riding or go for a road bike.

    I think I've settled on keeping my current bike for trail riding and getting a decent road bike for the speed.

    And yeah, I'm toying with training this fall/winter for races in the spring so something that would be good for competitive purposes is also key but not a make or break.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 16, 2007 9:16 PM GMT
    If your going for a road bike then they are both the two brands that I would recommend. They are great quality and great warrenty.

    The high end bikes are not your typical taiwanese frame picked from a catalogue and given a new paintjob.

    I have riden on a trek since 2001 and I enjoy it.

    The Hincape brothers would probably recommend Trek since Hincape is part of the Discovery Team that rides on a Trek and are sponsored by Trek, so it's a biased opinion.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 17, 2007 6:46 PM GMT
    Thanks for the info can. Now to more specifics. Does anyone have thoughts experience with "hybrids" versus straight up road bikes and mtn bikes? Are they good for someone who can't commit and isn't serious about one or the other or are they legitimately functional in both arenas?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 17, 2007 6:51 PM GMT
    Hell no. Everyone needs at least three bikes.

    BTW: Don't the Hincapies also own a piece of Team Slipstream, which rides Felt? Now that Disco is no more, who knows where self-interest may lie.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 17, 2007 8:07 PM GMT
    Mindgarden, I'd LOVE for you to be here when I try to make that argument to my husband! And then there's the space issue - my 'sports stuff' is starting to overflow the joint!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 17, 2007 8:24 PM GMT
    There are zillions of ways to store bikes.
    examples: http://www.bikerackshops.com/groupgaragestorage.html?gclid=CJ3HmqWoy44CFQflhgodFF3gCA

    130RPlarge.jpg
    PDS-2Rlarge.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 17, 2007 8:37 PM GMT
    TOO cool! I might just have to look into those. Between my bike(s) and his, we'll have them all over the place. And remarkably, some of those racks look totally suited to an apartment on the fourth floor as we are. Thanks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 18, 2007 4:09 AM GMT
    I personally ride a Serotta for my road bike and couldn't be happier. Just go to the bike shop and try it all on for size.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 18, 2007 5:12 AM GMT
    as was mentioned above, the production line bikes aren't bad: trek or Specialized. Perhaps consider the long term and therefore go to a framebuilder. custom bikes are the way to go. really not that expensive overall. Mariposa was my frame builder-excellent choice.
    I prefer the tighter frame for hill climbing and the distance riding.
    My first decent mtn bike was a Fat Chance, had the revelutionary bottom bracket of the day.
    happy trails
  • hotversguy

    Posts: 155

    Oct 14, 2007 3:15 AM GMT
    I have a specialized road bike. probably would have gone for a hybrid, but there's the factor of lugging it up the stairs in a manhattan apartment. i know, lazy. this thing weighs less than the locks i use...

    ...miss my stump jumper though, and riding through the Wissahickon Park outside Philly....stopping with sunny boys in shady places....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 14, 2007 3:24 AM GMT
    All I can add is that I know a gay that works for Trek, so support the gays...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 30, 2007 4:00 AM GMT
    I work for Trek so my opinion is obviously bias, but overall it is a great company with a ton of other gays employed there and still family owned unlike Specialized. The products we make are almost all better than specialized and our warranty/replacement policies embarrass them. As a cyclist and a person in the industry the best advice I can give is to find a bike shop that treats you well and buy a bike they sell and support.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2007 6:17 PM GMT
    Unless you're looking for a simple townie cruiser I think you should steer away from a hybrid bike. They aren't beefy enough to take on a serious off-road trail nor are they fast enough for any long-distance road riding.

    Trek and Specialized both make fine road bikes. However, there are a number of other road bike manufacturers that make quality bikes as well.

    My road bike is a Felt F55. I think it's a solid value for money. Bianchi USA also makes solid road bikes (and good MTB single speeds).

    Hope this helps.
  • jockguy05

    Posts: 3

    Nov 17, 2007 1:07 AM GMT
    Go with the strength, and get a Giant. With there buying power you get more bang for bucks.My roadie is TCR1 comp, and my MTB is an XTC2 disc. I'm not sure if they are sold in the US (I.E those particular models), but I can vouch for there quality. I just got back from a charity ride from Phillip Island, Victoria to Sydney N.S.W. 1165km in 12 days. Yep my butt hurts but the bike didn't miss a beat.No wonder i can't bulk up icon_smile.gif
  • mtnbiker7

    Posts: 34

    Nov 21, 2007 12:33 AM GMT
    I've ridden an old school french Motobecane for years. The steel frame is velvety, the components are decent. It's heavy. I don't care. I'm not racing, I'm riding. As far as mtn bikes go, I love my fat Giant full suspension with discs. Again, it's heavy, but I have more fun per pound than most of my friends. All of my weight conscious riding companions prefer Specialized, for road or mountain. Just go ride everything, in the right size, and buy the one that YOU love!
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 13928

    Jan 06, 2008 9:24 PM GMT
    I would love to buy a Trek roadbike but they are too damn expensive. I currently own a bianchi brava roadbike and I am very satisfied with it. My bianchi roadbike has gotten me around Buffalo and its suburbs with very few problems. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 10, 2008 5:15 AM GMT
    Trek has a "lock" on the largest piece of the market, perhaps, but I'd be much less likely to say that they have a "lock" on the best road bike.

    Trek is undoubtedly a very strong manufacturer of bicycles, and per capita probably has the most bikes on the road. However I am not so quick to say that just because everyone has one it's the best.

    Trek's edge on the market comes much from word of mouth. Someone knows someone who adores Trek, so they buy their first bike: a Trek. They fall in love with cycling and get their brother to do it and tell him that Trek is the only way to go... without ever having ridden another brand.

    I ride a Motobecane Le Champion SL 20-spd. Yes. I got a bike factory direct from a Taiwanese manufacturer. And yes. I got all your $2600 components for $1100. This is my second Motobecane. Do I say that Motobecane is the best out there? No. Because I haven't owned anything else.

    Remember that "best" is very subjective. I've test-ridden Trek, Specialized, Orbea, Bianchi, Giant, Felt, Litespeed, and others. All feel different.

    I'd say that Trek vs. Specialized vs. anyone else is not so much a universal law so much as it is what YOU want.

    Patrick
  • roadbike

    Posts: 84

    Jan 11, 2008 4:51 AM GMT
    Gigaram saidThanks for the info can. Now to more specifics. Does anyone have thoughts experience with "hybrids" versus straight up road bikes and mtn bikes? Are they good for someone who can't commit and isn't serious about one or the other or are they legitimately functional in both arenas?


    Hello Gigaram: I've been into bicycles for 50 years. They have always been my favorite toys. I bought a Trek 9000 aluminum mtn. bike for my 40th birthday in 1991. I still have it and it works beautifully. I wanted a bike to commute that was lighter and faster than my Trek. I bought a 2005 Giant FCR-1 back in November 2005. It sold for $1,100. It is essentially a road bike with flat bars. It would not work off road. I looked at a Trek 7700 FX, but it was heavier than the Giant and a few hundred dollars more. My bike has a carbon fiber fork, chainstay, seatpost, and headset. It has over 5,000 miles now and still works great. I replace the chain every 1,000 miles with a Shimano Dura Ace chain. It saves the chain rings and rear cassette. I ride 7 1/2 miles each way to work and back. I get 75 miles in weekly just commuting. On the weekends, I usually go for a 20 - 30 mile ride somewhere. I'm riding the Tour de Palm Springs next month (See the thread for more info).

    Now about the bike that you want next: The big question is how much do you want to spend. That will dictate your best options. I have 2 friends that bought '07 Trek Madone 5.2 road bikes during the past year for $2,400 and $2,000 respectively. They really dust me going up the hills. Trek redid their entire Madone line this year. I would like a Madone 5.5. They go for $4,200 list, but the Trek San Diego store makes some great deals.

    To me, the money is well spent on a good bike. Get something lightweight and fast. Screw the mtn. bike - you already have one. Trek also offers 1 year same as cash if you want to buy a more expensive bike, but can't afford it. I highly recommend Trek.

    Have fun bike shopping!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 12, 2008 7:38 PM GMT
    BenjaminLee saidI work for Trek so my opinion is obviously bias, but overall it is a great company with a ton of other gays employed there and still family owned unlike Specialized. The products we make are almost all better than specialized and our warranty/replacement policies embarrass them. As a cyclist and a person in the industry the best advice I can give is to find a bike shop that treats you well and buy a bike they sell and support.



    I didn't know that! Must be my broken gaydar at work. Have been a loyal trek customer since 1983. I currently ride a 6.5 Madone...love it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 31, 2008 12:30 AM GMT
    Welp, after going to shop after shop, I ended up back at the shop that did a great tune up on my mtn bike. They let me hop on different bikes and it took me about 2 spins on a Specialized Allez to be sold. So. Much. Fun. So, now on to a fitting and then seeing what she can really do on a long open stretch of trail and hills!
  • code_joe

    Posts: 107

    Apr 02, 2008 10:36 PM GMT
    I am saving up to get a Specalized Allez myself. I sort of wish I would have gotten it a couple years when I got my new mtn bike. Then I could have had matching colors. How gay would that be? I have a Specalized Epic Mtn Bike and it ROCKS! I love the brain and it makes riding Cross Country very nice.