how do you make your coffee?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 5:42 AM GMT
    I had this dirt cheap coffee machine I got from KMart; probably no more than $15. What matters was the coffee I used, not the machine. But I finally broke its glass carafe.

    This one here was rated highly by Consumer Reports. I can also order a stainless steel carafe since I'm a fumble fingers.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0047Y0UQO/

    This is the one that was rated highest by Cook's magazine.

    http://www.amazon.com/Technivorm-Moccamaster-Coffee-Brewer-Thermo/dp/B002S4DI2S/

    $300 for a coffee maker? I only drink 1 cup a day.

    This is their second choice, rated a "best buy" at $150. Yeah, right.

    http://www.amazon.com/Bonavita-BV1800TH-Coffee-Thermal-Carafe/dp/B005YQZNO8/

    I've been using a stove top espresso maker in the meantime; does the job but it's hard to clean. I'm using regular grind and not as much so it's not espresso.

    41EEQGBYYmL._AA220_.jpg
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    Oct 05, 2013 11:22 AM GMT
    I like those black coffee stove top things, but use a Keurig mostly, even for tea.
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    Oct 05, 2013 11:28 AM GMT
    They're called a Moka pot and supposedly it's best not to clean them with soap. People use cheap coffee to season their Moka pot.

    If you own one of these Moka Pots (a lot of Italian household's will own one) I found these helpful tips from an Amazon review:

    Follow these tips for a unique coffee
    By T. Speidel - February 3, 2007

    Every family in Italy owns one of these machines. Here are a few tips:

    1. In Italy this is NOT called an espresso machine, but a Moka machine. An espresso is what you would drink in bar made with a steam or high pressure machine with the crema on top.

    2. Smaller size Moka machine tend to make better coffee.

    3. Never wash the Moka with detergents, just rinse it under tap water

    4. You've gotta use it often for a good coffee.

    5. If you haven't use it in a while, make a weak coffee ("lungo") and discard

    6. DO NOT put the MOka in the dishwasher.

    7. Use drinking water. Avoid tap water especially if very chlorinated

    8. Never compress the coffee.

    9. For a strong coffee fill the filter with ground coffee and make a small cupola that slightly protrudes beyond the rim. Do not press down.

    10. For best coffee, heat at very low heat. It's ok if it takes 10min.

    11. As soon as coffee reaches the top, remove from heat

    12. Do not let the coffee boil

    13. Use good quality coffee, not too strong, medium grind (try Illy for a good commercial brand)

    14. Sip while still hot, enjoy!

    15. (Added Nov 2012) - Wait until all the water has reached the upper chamber before removing from the heat. You will be able to tell by the sound (takes some practice) or simply visually. As soon as no more coffee reaches the upper chamber remove from heat. Do note let the coffee boil. With practice, you may remove from the heat even sooner, by just using the residual heat in the lower chamber.

    16. (Added Nov 2012) - Some times you may put too much coffee, or the coffee is too finely ground, or it's been packed too hard. In all of these situations, the end results is typically that the coffee struggles reaching the upper chamber. You can tell by the spouting noise occurring too early, the foam occurring too early, and how slow the whole process is. You can try increasing the heat if that helps. However, you will likely end up with a coffee that is too bitter and tastes burned. Back in the old days, this was dangerous business with many machines exploding (they had no safety valves). Regardless, your coffee is ruined and I would suggest removing it frmo the heat immediately, let it coold down and starts all over.

    17. (Added Nov 2012) - What kind of coffee should I use? Experiment, experiment, experiment! Here are some tips I have learned by experimenting. Until you become confortable with the operations of the machine, you can use a good commercial brand like Illy (although it's quite expensive). I wouldn't want you to blame the machine, just because you happened to use a bad coffee. Then start trying different varieties from different roasters. If there are independent roasters near you, why not giving them a try? I haven't had good experience with roasts marketed towards Espresso machines (I find the roast too excessive). Try to buy whole beans and grind them yourself. I find the cheap and popular brands pretty bad for Mokas, even if they happen to make good American style brews. I have had pretty good luck with small roasters and Colombian varieties (or Costa Rican). I have also had outstanding African coffees (Ethiopian). Unfortunately, I found they are seldom consistent. [sic]

    I need the opposite of coffee. I used to get a solid 8 hours!
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    Oct 05, 2013 11:44 AM GMT
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzQ2i3i4_ZDqy2mN4O6nv

    F20342-Krups-Coffee-Mill.gif

    727015100067.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 3:07 PM GMT
    I've also used a French coffee press, they're pretty good, too.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Oct 05, 2013 3:24 PM GMT
    I like thermal carafes. They keep the coffee hot for at least a couple hours after brewing without added heat (which causes the coffee to turn bitter). I used to have a really good one that was bought cheap but it was plastic and a friend with Alzheimer’s sat it on a hot stove (not the burner but a part of the stove where heat from the oven was coming up) and melted it. So, after several expensive failed attempts (why it is so difficult to design a coffee carafe that stays hot and actually lets the coffee into it as it is brewing is beyond my comprehension but apparently it is VERY VERY DIFFICULT), I found this one:

    61M5Ab6vgiL.jpg

    JC Penny has it for $60.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 4:33 PM GMT
    Regarding turning coffee bitter, what would be the difference between adding heat to a glass pot or maintaining heat with a thermal one? Assuming a coffee maker doesn't blast heat from its hotplate, if both keep similar energy in the pot simply by different means, then how would taste results differ? And if so concerned with such subtlety of taste, then wouldn't steel have more of a chance of imparting an odd flavor than would glass?

    I considered stainless with the idea of not breaking glass on the rare occasion that my coffee making isn't timed well with my dishwasher loading, but I couldn't get my hand inside the thing to clean it so I found a Mr. Coffee in glass with a wide-mouthed pot on sale. I think I paid $30. Just looked and it sells for $40 now. It just has to heat water and drip through the grinds. All the electronics of a technologically advanced (what a fucking joke) is bullshit as far as I'm concerned.

    Already having mistimed the dishwasher, I did have to hand clean and did break the thing while swishing water in it without paying attention, cracked it on the in-side of the sink. The store carries replacements for $12 so was easy to replace. I've been more careful since.

    Hopefully answering these questions will help to bring world peace. Glad I could be of assistance.
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    Oct 05, 2013 4:48 PM GMT
    I've got a couple of those - one on the boat and one in the camping box. I think the result is somewhere between percolated coffee and espresso. The big drawback is if you need a second cup or have guests on board. It's a real PITA to re-cycle without getting grounds all over the galley and/or incurring second-degree burns. Also they seem to run through gaskets pretty quickly. So I just bought a plain old stainless steel 6-cup percolator for the boat. It's getting to that time of year when you need a hot cup to sip on all day in the cockpit anyway.

    At home, I have this:

    saeco%20estro%20profi.jpg

    Makes a perfect cup with no mess any time I want one. The only problem is that I've had it for over 20 years and now it constantly needs repairs. Then I look at the price of any comparable new machine and my jaw drops. So I take it back out to the workshop and send away for parts...
  • jo2hotbod

    Posts: 3603

    Oct 05, 2013 5:53 PM GMT
    At the drive thru
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 5:59 PM GMT
    Don't like coffee.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 7:26 PM GMT
    AnOriginal said...

    Thanks. I was doing all of those as it happens, except for 3 and 6; washing it.

    I can't abide a dirty kitchen utensil. You could see oils and residue stuck to it. I can't see why washing it would matter. As long as you rinse it well it shouldn't hurt to have it clean; typical women's mumbo jumbo voodoo old wive's tale if you ask me..
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    Oct 05, 2013 7:39 PM GMT
    Agreed, except some of those things are cast aluminum, and you'll never get all the soap out of the pores. (Or the oils, for that matter.) Stick with glass or stainless, problem solved!
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    Oct 05, 2013 7:46 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidAgreed, except some of those things are cast aluminum, and you'll never get all the soap out of the pores. (Or the oils, for that matter.) Stick with glass or stainless, problem solved!

    I guess. I'm still sceptical. In any event mine really doesn't look like that; I'm too embarrassed to say how much I spent for it; I had to get it because my stove is induction so mine is all stainless steel with an iron layer in the base. Mine is all sleek and streamlined and tres chic looking but it works exactly the same way.
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    Oct 05, 2013 9:21 PM GMT
    Ravensong saidDon't like coffee.


    I'm more of tea person. I even bought one of those machines that keep the water at a consistent tempature. Coffee bothers my stomach at times. I drink tea at least every other day and coffee maybe once a month.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 9:33 PM GMT
    Yeah tea person here
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 05, 2013 9:48 PM GMT
    Keurig single cup.

    Bought it for my husband almost 3 years ago. I saw him unable to effectively make less than 2 or 3 cups with a conventional drip coffeemaker, and then throwing half of it away, because he only wanted a single cup.

    Also got a reusable Keurig basket cup, so he can use the much cheaper ground coffee brand he likes, rather than the more expensive pre-filled K-Cups.

    In the long run it's saved us money, and with less clean up (no coffee pot). Previously half the coffee he brewed was going down the drain. And we all know how bitter a second cup can taste if you don't want it until hours after it's been sitting.

    Now he uses less ground coffee, a considerable savings, and if he wants a second cup, or even a third, he just repeats the easy process. Brewing on demand by the cup makes much more sense than brewing by the pot, unless it's gonna all be consumed at once.
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    Oct 05, 2013 10:16 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidimages?q=tbn:ANd9GcQzQ2i3i4_ZDqy2mN4O6nv

    F20342-Krups-Coffee-Mill.gif

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    Including a pound of great coffee beans, the above will cost you about $50. BEST COFFEE EVER.
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    Oct 05, 2013 11:09 PM GMT
    Forced out of my own free will.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 06, 2013 1:20 AM GMT
    I make coffee three different ways.

    Aeropress if I want shots of espresso.
    AeroPress_action2.jpg

    French press for cups of coffee on the weekend when I have time.
    french-press-tea-and-coffee.jpg

    Automatic drip that is set up the night before work days so I will have coffee to go on my way out the door.
    cuisinart-brew-central-coffee-maker.jpg

    I always use locally roasted beans and have a variable setting burr grinder to make sure I have the right size of grounds for each method. I've also been weighing coffee instead of measuring it.

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  • Fritter

    Posts: 1696

    Oct 06, 2013 1:25 AM GMT
    I speak into a speaker, drive up 10 feet, and receive one.
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  • Fritter

    Posts: 1696

    Oct 06, 2013 1:25 AM GMT
    I speak into a speaker, drive up 10 feet, and receive one.
    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 06, 2013 1:28 AM GMT
    keurig-mini-coffee-maker-red.jpg
  • madsexy

    Posts: 4843

    Oct 06, 2013 1:42 AM GMT
    livelifenow saidkeurig-mini-coffee-maker-red.jpg

    This at home (Costco had the k-cups on sale recently, and I'm set for a while now!) - Starbucks if I'm out and feel like loosing up the BUCKS.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Oct 06, 2013 1:52 AM GMT
    I don't drink coffee!

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  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Oct 06, 2013 1:57 AM GMT
    I have a Delonghi espresso machine. I made a double-shot of espresso and steam up Lactaid milk and add Hazelnut syrup.