How Intense Study May Harm Your Workout

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 07, 2013 12:33 AM GMT
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/02/how-intense-study-may-harm-our-workouts/?_r=1&

    Tire your brain and your body may follow, a remarkable new study of mental fatigue finds. Strenuous mental exertion may lessen endurance and lead to shortened workouts, even if, in strict physiological terms, your body still has plenty of energy reserves.
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Oct 07, 2013 2:31 AM GMT
    I think it has to do with stress as well. Working all day can be stressful and draining and doesn't leave a lot of energy for working out. That's why I like it when I'm working from home. I'm so much more relaxed that I can actually put in a good workout after.
  • stratavos

    Posts: 1831

    Oct 07, 2013 4:14 AM GMT
    allatonce saidI think it has to do with stress as well. Working all day can be stressful and draining and doesn't leave a lot of energy for working out. That's why I like it when I'm working from home. I'm so much more relaxed that I can actually put in a good workout after.


    Get this man a cookie, or a bel ami model.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 07, 2013 10:04 AM GMT
    I study all day & workout at 8 in evening


    opps
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 07, 2013 10:12 AM GMT
    There is an element of truth here.

    My father worked in factories for most of his career. I have worked in offices. I would come home from work and claim that I was tired. My family would criticize me.

    "How can you be tired if all you do is sit behind a comfy desk all day?"

    I am a hard worker. Even if it isn't as physically exerting as some jobs. I am still tired at the end of a long day. Stress, and mental exertion both can play a part in fatigue. - Which is why my preferred workout time is first thing in the morning. The endorphins help keep me energized throughout the day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 07, 2013 5:21 PM GMT
    My conclusion:
    Minimize your brain activity for maximum workout gain.

    That makes sense.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 07, 2013 6:44 PM GMT
    Bharatiya saidMy conclusion:
    Minimize your brain activity for maximum workout gain.

    That makes sense.

    Like, duuuh. Totally brah.
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Oct 11, 2013 1:05 PM GMT
    stratavos said
    allatonce saidI think it has to do with stress as well. Working all day can be stressful and draining and doesn't leave a lot of energy for working out. That's why I like it when I'm working from home. I'm so much more relaxed that I can actually put in a good workout after.


    Get this man a cookie, or a bel ami model.


    I'll take the latter please
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2013 6:01 AM GMT
    Mental fatigue in and of itself is harmful cognitively and physically (not only neuromuscular-wise).

    Just take a look at physicians or med students in their 3rd and 4th years. They don't look like happy people many times. So, it isn't a surprise physical performance is affected, even though central fatigue isn't as big of a contributor as thought before (according to this study). But with any study, it needs to be taken with a grain of salt, until more studies come up that support the same conclusions (this was a study of 10 individuals --> not representative of everyone).

    How does the same study procedure affect individuals who are routinely tasked cognitively and have adapted vs. individuals who aren't cognitively-exerted on a daily basis on a strength or endurance task. In addition, what type of mental tasks? Familiar? Unfamiliar? etc.

    Sorry. Lots of questions.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2013 6:17 AM GMT
    Hmmm... Interesting study, but there seem to be a lot of uncontrolled variables and, as someone else has said, the sample size is too small to draw anything like a firm conclusion.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2013 6:19 AM GMT
    I definetly had worse workouts when I was in school. even if im tired from work, its still better then when I was taking classes.
  • Oceans_of_Flo...

    Posts: 393

    Oct 12, 2013 7:56 AM GMT
    This is why a big burly work out partner is needed, to stimulate one's mental hot spring. Him standing overhead, balls swinging like a pendulum, yelling at you like this is boot camp, gripping the bar, but staring down at you - watching you strain and exert, not pulling up until the last possible second - OH MY GOD.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2013 10:02 AM GMT
    Exercise enhances your cognitive ability. That's been well known for years.

    If you're "in the zone" (a state that many IT guys know well), it takes a bit to switch from think mode to grunt mode.

    The endorphins are strong anti-depressants.


    Five things help you live longer:
    1. Diet
    2. Exercise
    3. Keeping stress down / perspective.
    4. An active brain.,
    5. Not being alone.

    Of course, genes come into play, too, but, if he you do all above things you generally can grow old gracefully.
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    Oct 12, 2013 12:42 PM GMT
    GuiltyGear saidThis is why a big burly work out partner is needed, to stimulate one's mental hot spring. Him standing overhead, balls swinging like a pendulum, yelling at you like this is boot camp, gripping the bar, but staring down at you - watching you strain and exert, not pulling up until the last possible second - OH MY GOD.

    THAT'S what we've been needing! icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2013 7:57 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidExercise enhances your cognitive ability. That's been well known for years.

    If you're "in the zone" (a state that many IT guys know well), it takes a bit to switch from think mode to grunt mode.

    The endorphins are strong anti-depressants.


    Five things help you live longer:
    1. Diet
    2. Exercise
    3. Keeping stress down / perspective.
    4. An active brain.,
    5. Not being alone.

    Of course, genes come into play, too, but, if he you do all above things you generally can grow old gracefully.


    I think I've got all those covered, though #2 could always use more attention.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 14, 2013 3:03 PM GMT
    no wonder im fat, so much work draining my brain every day.