i went running

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 26, 2008 1:23 AM GMT
    i never run. and oddly i got the urge to run yesterday. and i ran and pathetically didn't get too far. and didn't feel so good. which is when i threw up. three times ...? is that bad?
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    Nov 26, 2008 2:14 AM GMT
    Many new runners or even returning runners find that first run a...traumatic experience that involves vomiting and pain for several days afterward.

    The key to continuing?

    Do some good stretching for a couple of days. Drink lots of fluids. Before your next run, engage in a good warm up. Lots of jumping jacks, push ups and sit ups. Then run. Do what you can at what pace you can. Once finished, spending a good 15 minutes stretching and cooling down.

    Rest a day or two, be sure to sleep plenty. Then repeat.

    Next thing you know you'll be ready for your first 5K.
  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Nov 26, 2008 2:29 AM GMT
    Me too. When I first started to run/ jog, I even felt sharp pains at my stomach & I felt like giving up.

    But once I got used to it after a few days, I became addicted! I got the runner's high; it was a great feeling, like feeling tipsy after a few drinks! It's the release of endorphines in the brain, similar to morphine.

    Good luck!
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    Nov 26, 2008 2:51 AM GMT
    Holy shit. I'm kinda fat and I've never been through that when I've ran.

    Perhaps you ought to start with stationary machines first while taking long walks. Everyday I take two walks, an hour each. They're pretty good for building strength in the legs.
  • reliable1

    Posts: 65

    Nov 26, 2008 2:55 AM GMT
    Runinthecity gave good advice. Overdoing it at first is one of the quickest ways to self-sabatoge. It's very easy to give up on something if you make yourself sick doing it.

    I'd run for a short distance a couple times, making sure you don't get sick afterwards, and then take it from there.
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    Nov 26, 2008 2:56 AM GMT
    After eating a meal, wait about 2 hours before running.
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    Nov 26, 2008 3:06 AM GMT
    As Jane Fonda always says: Listen to your body!
    Be comfortable doing what it is that you do. With respect to running: Runner's World Magazine says to only increase distance by 10% because cardiovascular capacity increases faster than the body's (joints, etc) capacity for enduring strain. Or something like that.
    A few years ago when I started to run/jog, I jogged 10 miles on my first day; I did feel discomfort but I didn't push myself. I can push myself now quite comfortably, but it took a lot of 10% adjustments.
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    Nov 26, 2008 3:26 AM GMT
    RunintheCity saidMany new runners or even returning runners find that first run a...traumatic experience that involves vomiting and pain for several days afterward.

    The key to continuing?

    Do some good stretching for a couple of days. Drink lots of fluids. Before your next run, engage in a good warm up. Lots of jumping jacks, push ups and sit ups. Then run. Do what you can at what pace you can. Once finished, spending a good 15 minutes stretching and cooling down.

    Rest a day or two, be sure to sleep plenty. Then repeat.

    Next thing you know you'll be ready for your first 5K.


    I agree. I ran forever before switching to a bike. The other day I ended up running up and down a mountain on what I THOUGHT was a hike. I was very nautious and had lots of pain in my abdomen for two days. I'm glad it happened as I realized how much running does for the core. So I'm going to be mixing it up now.
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    Nov 26, 2008 3:41 AM GMT
    Scorpio_M saidAfter eating a meal, wait about 2 hours before running.


    I'd recommend that or even more.

    And don't have dairy products about three or more hours before hadn.

    Everyone's body is different though, so you might need more or less.
    My dad knew a guy who could eat a lot and then just go run.
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    Nov 26, 2008 4:14 AM GMT
    Everybody's body is different, so listen to your body and find out when the best time is for you to run. What you do before and after will determine how your run goes and how you feel afterward.
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    Nov 26, 2008 9:10 AM GMT
    well thank you. this is very enlightening
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Nov 26, 2008 12:12 PM GMT
    The only thing I didn't like was the word pathetically...

    you did it... you went out there and ran
    now you can go back and put into place some of the things that you learned

    maybe to run a bit slower next time
    don't go as far
    listen to your body
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Nov 26, 2008 1:09 PM GMT
    Keep doing it. When I return to running after long absent, my feet aches and I am out of breathe. But the longer I run the easier and fun it got.