Flax seed

  • ashyboi5000

    Posts: 29

    Oct 09, 2013 9:32 PM GMT
    Didn't know what forum to put this in.

    My Pt has told/reconmended me to buy flax seed.
    What is the benefit of this and how much should I take?

    Guessing I should be trying to fit it into meals? Springled in with muesli/porridge type thing?
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    Oct 10, 2013 12:26 AM GMT
    That will work. It has a nutty flavor that goes well with cereals. Try a teaspoon, and see if you notice any changes. There are many health benefits.

    You can get it ground as fine as flour, but you may enjoy the texture more if it's just lightly ground, or you grind it yourself.

  • Oct 10, 2013 12:54 AM GMT
    http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/benefits-of-flaxseed
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    Oct 10, 2013 12:55 AM GMT
    The fact that your PT didn't tell you why you should take it or how much is strange. It almost sounds like a knee-jerk recommendation. Flax seed does have some health benefits, but no more so than many other natural foods. You can include them in your balanced diet, but don't go overboard.

    Flaxseeds contain phytoestrogens. Some people are concerned that these estrogen-like compounds may have a negative effect in humans. We usually hear warnings about soy, but flaxseeds actually have far more of these compounds. If you eat them, do so in moderation. The studies on phytoestrogens are conflicting. Until more is known, don't go overdo it.
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    Oct 10, 2013 12:59 AM GMT
    Flaxseed is great because of its high levels of alpha-linolenic acid (omega 3 fatty acid). The current western diet is actually really deficient in w-3 fatty acids - ratio of w6:w3 is 15-20:1 instead of an optimum 1-5:1 ratio. This imbalance is thought to be linked to various cardiovascular and chronic diseases. It's also got great protein, dietary fiber and lignans. Recommended dosage is 1-2 tbsps ground flaxseed a day.
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    Oct 10, 2013 1:07 AM GMT
    The Omega-3's in vegan sources do not have the same health benefits as the Omega-3's (DHA and EPA) in fish and other meat sources. The only way to get DHA and EPA from a plant source is to eat algae, which is how the fish get it.
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    Oct 10, 2013 1:45 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidThe Omega-3's in vegan sources do not have the same health benefits as the Omega-3's (DHA and EPA) in fish and other meat sources. The only way to get DHA and EPA from a plant source is to eat algae, which is how the fish get it.


    This is semi-correct. Fish oil is definitely the best source for EPA and DHA but alpha linolenic acid from plant sources can also be converted in the body to EPA though DHA conversion is limited.

    EFA_to_Eicosanoids.svg
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:20 AM GMT
    woodsmen said^Eat more salmon instead.

    Ick, I hate fish! icon_twisted.gif

    I'm also sceptical about a physical therapist giving nutritional advice. The PT may well be right, but still, they should stick to their speciality.
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:24 AM GMT
    I use to put golden flax seed in my yogurt ... but lets just say it never appeared to get "digested". So I don't think I ever received the nutrients from it. Stopped eating it.
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:37 AM GMT
    A scientist, medical octor in Germany, Joanne Budwig, has done studies which show that flaxseed oil or seeds, taken with a high protein source, like cottage cheese, has cured cancer and can be a preventative treatment to aid in preventing it. Look it up on the net for the data. It couldn't hurt...and I'm sure it would be better than chemo.
  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Oct 10, 2013 4:39 AM GMT
    S34n05 saidI use to put golden flax seed in my yogurt ... but lets just say it never appeared to get "digested". So I don't think I ever received the nutrients from it. Stopped eating it.


    The shell is difficult to digest. Thus, grind the seeds. I use my coffee grinder.
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:50 AM GMT
    S34n05 saidI use to put golden flax seed in my yogurt ... but lets just say it never appeared to get "digested". So I don't think I ever received the nutrients from it. Stopped eating it.

    You can by the ground up seeds or use them in a good blender like a Vitamix.
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:50 AM GMT
    Asheguy74 saidA scientist, medical octor in Germany, Joanne Budwig, has done studies which show that flaxseed oil or seeds, taken with a high protein source, like cottage cheese, has cured cancer and can be a preventative treatment to aid in preventing it. Look it up on the net for the data. It couldn't hurt...and I'm sure it would be better than chemo.

    Other studies have shown that phytoestrogens increase cancer. You can't go by these little studies.
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    Oct 10, 2013 5:08 AM GMT
    woodsmen said^Stay away from ingesting pseudo-estrogen into a male body except for those that are naturally produced as part of your specific genetic chemical factory.



    It looks like flaxseed oil should be left for making paint and linoleum. Use purified fish oil.
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    Oct 10, 2013 8:49 AM GMT
    Adamc_87 said
    DudeInNOVA saidThe Omega-3's in vegan sources do not have the same health benefits as the Omega-3's (DHA and EPA) in fish and other meat sources. The only way to get DHA and EPA from a plant source is to eat algae, which is how the fish get it.


    This is semi-correct. Fish oil is definitely the best source for EPA and DHA but alpha linolenic acid from plant sources can also be converted in the body to EPA though DHA conversion is limited.

    EFA_to_Eicosanoids.svg


    I forget the studies, but don't you need borage oil or something in order to best benefit from flaxseeds omega 3 content?

    Flaxseed is also a great way to get added fiber. EVERYbody responds differently to foods and their benefits. They say to avoid the whole seeds, because they need to be ground in order to benefit from them. Some people mix them in their protein shakes -- if you like pulp in your orange juice you may like this.

    I know people are scared of phytoestrogens, but small amounts of tofu and flaxseeds are a lot better than eating a Twinkies. I actually didn't know flaxseeds were high in phytoestrogens (I'd like to see data please). Seriously I don't think flaxseed is a miracle or a villain -- I do think it's healthy, and if the store wasn't out of it I'd be adding it to my oatmeal daily. I will admit I find fish to personally be a better form of Omega 3 -- I have to play Fear Factor when eating fish. They also sell fish capsules.
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:43 PM GMT
    There seems to be very limited epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic data on flax phytoestrogens so can't make too many definitive statements.

    Importantly, I found that short term usage does not change the hormonal profile in men but not much is known efficacy wise.

    In my opinion, flax is still a very good functional food, especially if fish oil isn't an option for you. As DudeInNOVA said, just exercise caution with it.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.proxy1.lib.umanitoba.ca/doi/10.1002/ptr.1364/full Phytoestrogens: a review of the present state of research

    http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy1.lib.umanitoba.ca/science/article/pii/S0271531705806876Effect of short-term flaxseed consumption on lignan and sex hormone metabolism in men


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    Oct 10, 2013 5:59 PM GMT
    Adamc_87 saidThere seems to be very limited epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic data on flax phytoestrogens so can't make too many definitive statements.

    Importantly, I found that short term usage does not change the hormonal profile in men but not much is known efficacy wise.

    In my opinion, flax is still a very good functional food, especially if fish oil isn't an option for you. As DudeInNOVA said, just exercise caution with it.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.proxy1.lib.umanitoba.ca/doi/10.1002/ptr.1364/full Phytoestrogens: a review of the present state of research

    http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy1.lib.umanitoba.ca/science/article/pii/S0271531705806876Effect of short-term flaxseed consumption on lignan and sex hormone metabolism in men



    So, do you have any opinions on the Paleo diet?
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    Oct 10, 2013 6:20 PM GMT
    I buy it ground and mix it in to my fruit / yogurt smoothies.
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    Oct 10, 2013 6:48 PM GMT
    Just get EPA/DHA or fish oil/krill oil. It's better used by the body. ALA supplements (flaxseed) are mostly for people who have vegan/vegetarian moralistic beliefs. The conversion is limited to EPA/DHA.

    The wikipedia article on phytoestrogens details all the foods you eat everyday that are considered healthy that no one mentions have phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are a different compound than estrogen. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytoestrogens
    (scroll to Food Sources and Health Risks and Benefits)
    --If you have a problem with me citing wikipedia, a secondary source, you are welcome to click the footnotes which lead to the primary Pubmed articles referenced, which I checked prior to recommendation.

    To say that consuming soy and phytoestrogen containing foods is still controversial is siding with anti-soy political activists. The truth is, if people figured out how great soy is, the cattle/dairy farmers would lose business, greenhouse gases would decrease, and more people would be not malnourished. It's a cheap complete protein (soy), and there is nothing wrong with phytoestrogens.

    Anecdotally, I have been consuming upwards of 70-80g of soy protein per day since I was 16. I had my testosterone checked at age 20 for other reasons and it was 835 ng/dL, which at that laboratory, was considered 10 points too high (but they did not find it cause for alarm). 25g per day is the minimum required for the health benefit (according to the labels). I have had no side effects and if anything, am leaner than meat eaters due to the lack of fat and increased fiber content that comes with using crushed soybeans as your protein source. Current research shows it reduces the risk of prostate cancer in men. It's even safe for people who have had breast cancer.

    What do they put in animals to make them have meat, by comparison? Real hormones. No one complains about that. Even if phytoestrogens have an effect, it's not like the body wouldn't adapt by downregulating the receptors that bind the phytoestrogens to regulate downstream effects of consumption, provided excessive increases in consumption (not maintaining a consistent intake) do not alter the expression.

    LAST AND NOT LEAST, your personal trainer is stepping outside of his scope of practice to recommend flaxseed to you, which would be in the nutritional counseling domain, unless he has formal education in nutrition (at least a BS, preferably the registered dietitian (RD) credential, both which require 4-5 years intensive science education--all other nutrition credentials out there are bullshit weekend courses). Heck, does your personal trainer even have a BS in exercise science, kinesiology, exercise physiology? FYI the industry is backwards, where they require a certification instead of a degree to be hired at most gyms, and that's because certification bodies pay gyms to hire their certified trainers...
    --Edit: above paragraph applies to the US, not sure about the UK.
  • ashyboi5000

    Posts: 29

    Oct 10, 2013 8:03 PM GMT
    Thanks guy.

    Quick note, by PT i mean personal trainer.

    He mentioned it during my first session by asking if I went out and bought (or tried) some yet.
    I had a consultation the week before, going over health concerns, fitness and diet. He may have mentioned something then about it but honestly don't remember.
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    Oct 10, 2013 8:24 PM GMT
    bluey2223 saidIf you have a problem with me citing wikipedia, a secondary source, you are welcome to click the footnotes which lead to the primary Pubmed articles referenced, which I checked prior to recommendation.


    I think I may be in love with you.
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    Oct 11, 2013 4:15 AM GMT
    its good but they only work if they are grinded up in a coffee grinder. you have to used them within a certain time or they lose their potency. you have to keep them refrigerated to make them last longer. you can get the oil but i always felt that it loses its potency. seeds can be freshly grinded and sprinkled over toast. however, toast isn't good anymore since it they started putting soybean oil and too many preservatives in it. you could buy fresh bread that is natural or make your own. otherwise you can sprinkle it on a salad. it has a kind of sweet taste so taste it first then think what it would taste best on.. experiment with it to start your own routine. good luck!!!
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    Oct 11, 2013 9:49 PM GMT
    shortbutsweet saidThat will work. It has a nutty flavor that goes well with cereals. Try a teaspoon, and see if you notice any changes. There are many health benefits.

    You can get it ground as fine as flour, but you may enjoy the texture more if it's just lightly ground, or you grind it yourself.


    I've actually had flax seed pancakes - they were pretty good too.