Public or Private School?

  • Import

    Posts: 7193

    Oct 10, 2013 2:05 AM GMT
    Do you think there are significant advantages by being in a private school as opposed to public?

    Also, what type of school did u attend?

    The reason I ask is because I work for a public university and my job requires me to visit various types of high schools in an effort to recruit qualified students into the university I work for. I go to both public and private schools and do a lot of public speaking in front of juniors and seniors in high school. Some students are so talented and bright and will be going places in life, while others I'm not so sure

    I have my opinions, however I'd be curious as to what the average Rjer would think...and what type of education they are a product of.

    What do you think? Public? ...private?

  • Fable

    Posts: 3866

    Oct 10, 2013 2:11 AM GMT
    you get what you pay for.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 2:13 AM GMT
    I don't know if this matters but I went to public and also was home schooled. I noticed when I hit public school in high school I was really anti-social and didn't really know how to deal with other people. Could it be because I was home schooled? most likely it was.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 2:19 AM GMT
    I went to both private and public schools. Private schools are better.. But in the end achievement depends on the student.
  • Import

    Posts: 7193

    Oct 10, 2013 2:26 AM GMT
    itsmesnitches saidfrom 1-8th grade, went to a poor catholic school in an inner city neighborhood.

    9th to 12th grade, went to a well known public high school in the burbs.

    gained more out of public school than catholic school for sure. the private school i went to didn't have shit in terms of extracurricular activities. all they had was girl scouts for the girls. we didn't have a chance to excel in anything. plus the education wasn't really that good. most of us couldn't reach our potential because of the lack of resources the school had. icon_sad.gif they took advantage of the fact that the public school system in our town wasn't that good, ghetto and how it was a safer environment. they were also pushing religion and jesus in the mix trying to brainwash us into that shit. they also were about that money. they would punish us if we didn't give them money or pay up the tuition on time too. my father being the fucked up guy he was didn't pay up and we got punished for that shit. they were really fucked up like that. i remember how they did my brother wrong when he was about to join the spelling bee and they said he couldn't participate because my father didn't pay up. had my report cards held back from me couple of times because of that.

    with public school, it was different. they had everything and it was a much better setting than the catholic school i came out of. however, there was racism in that school because they had a level system where they would place most of the white kids in the level 4 classes (that's ap and all) and the black kids in the level 1 to 2 classes. though the student body was very diverse since the two towns that the students came out of there were diverse, the school was segregated. when the new principal came in which was some crazy ass woman from brooklyn, shit hit rock bottom. either way, i felt i got more out of those 4 years of high school in terms of figuring myself out, seeing my potential then those 9 years in that shitty catholic school that eventually got shut down and merged with some other school. it's that for me by the time i went in high school, i was fucked up so i wasn't all there or in my right mind.


    Catholic schools are not funded by tax payers, so they rely on tuition to function and operate. Your father didn't pay the tuition. How do u expect the school to operate when tuition isn't being paid? Of course they denied your brother access to the Spelling bee and ur report cards ...u weren't paying up. Novel idea, huh? Private and Catholic school dont receive tax payer dollars like public schools...... What did u expect? For them to just educate u and ur brother for free while everyone else paid? icon_rolleyes.gif ...what was fucked up was the fact that your Dad didn't pay the tuition. The school was not fucked up.

    More, being that u attended a Catholic school, common sense would tell u that Catholic religion classes are part of the deal.... duh.




  • Import

    Posts: 7193

    Oct 10, 2013 2:29 AM GMT
    Seric saidI don't know if this matters but I went to public and also was home schooled. I noticed when I hit public school in high school I was really anti-social and didn't really know how to deal with other people. Could it be because I was home schooled? most likely it was.

    When we have home schooled kids apply to the university it's always kind of an awkward thing because the home-schooled kids cannot produce transcripts and we're like "How can we measure this students academic success with nothing?.... however I think home-schooled student can register with the school district and are supposed to follow a state curriculum, however none of them ever seem to do that. oh well.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 2:33 AM GMT
    Went to public school. It was awesome. The quality of education was average. But the social experience was really good. Met and became friends with people from all walks of life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 2:52 AM GMT
    Regarding colleges, my ol' man (Cornell) once said you can go to ivy league and get a crappy education or to state school (me) and get a good one. It's up to the student.

    I was in three high schools, public, private, then public again.

    My first public was just as demanding as the private and with pretty much similar resources except, well, the private one was directly on the Caribbean. My last school, public, was Florida. My folks were not aware of how bad it was. My last year I got a 4.25 out of a possible 4.0 (extra for college level as then rated) yet I had my best tan in senior year. I hardly ever attended classes and even had teachers, so impressed with my work, tell me not to bother coming in for finals. It was a joke.

    Joke was on me. I was completely unprepared for college. Clepped out of a crapload of work and then had an advisor who looked at my record and put me in all advanced classes, after I had just spent my last school year tanning. I freaked.

    The question almost seems a little prejudiced or elitist. I'm decades out of the system but I'd think you'll find smart kids in public school who might be held back by a lack of resources yet who might excel in college; but also you might have some not so bright ones in private school who were held up by a crutch (tutors or helicopter parents with more time on their hands) that they might not have in college. I've no idea how a recruiter might predict or account for that.
  • PolitiMAC

    Posts: 728

    Oct 10, 2013 2:54 AM GMT
    Some might call it elitist, but really, private schools are disproportionately more populated with better faring students.

    Not always, but the money does do something. I've been around to many schools, Primary School was public, but High School was private, and although my first private school was alright, but not super special, the second one, the one I graduated from, was quite excellent. Great teachers for the most part, and good educational standards.

    I just have to look around at the public schools around Sydney, and I can see what I avoided thankfully icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 3:01 AM GMT
    I don't believe there is an advantage over a public v.s private school. Private schools will usually have a specific things like military or religion.

    Of course, if you want to do personal research, I suggest you look up school records and read personal reviews.

    Did that help?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 3:02 AM GMT
    I went to a public school and I'm glad that I did. Reasons are:

    1. I was a band geek and very active with the music program. We went to marching band competitions and kicked ass! I met so many students from other schools because of my involvement. I don't think you can get this kind of experience at a private school.

    2. Education wise, I was in the advance placement classes so I thought the quality of education was the same as some private schools.

    3. Public school helped me become an extrovert.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 6:34 AM GMT
    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQJEjDS_MYKYfjfONiXL-y

    tumblr_lgu8pvp2pV1qcz72no1_500.gif

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQNWcqgZRrUp3lFYgeiFUz
  • pandx970

    Posts: 357

    Oct 10, 2013 6:42 AM GMT
    I went to public school -- but participated in the International Baccalaureate program when I was in High School. I guess its finding your motivation. Sometimes we students in the USA take education for granted and don't engage enough with it, even in my liberal arts high school program, I did take it a lot for granted.

    Malala, dude, she just blew my mind when it comes to education.

    http://www.themuslimguy.com/video-watch-malala-yousafzais-full-interview-on-the-daily-show-with-jon-stewart/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 7:13 AM GMT
    itsmesnitches saidwith public school, it was different. they had everything and it was a much better setting than the catholic school i came out of. however, there was racism in that school because they had a level system where they would place most of the white kids in the level 4 classes (that's ap and all) and the black kids in the level 1 to 2 classes. though the student body was very diverse since the two towns that the students came out of there were diverse, the school was segregated.

    Were the students placed in different classes because of skin color or because of differences in achievement? If it was based on skin color it's racism. If based on achievement, it's not.

    Many schools have a four-tier math program. Students will start on Algebra I anywhere from 7th grade to 10th grade, depending on their ability and achievement. In racially mixed schools the early algebra classes will be disproportionately white. Would you advocate sticking some black kids who haven't mastered basic math in an Algebra I class just for racial balance? Are you willing to see these kids fail when they can't do the work?

    By the time kids hit fourth or fifth grade most classrooms will have a few students reading at the high school or even college level. There will also be some students reading three or four years behind grade level. These children simply should not be in the same classroom.

    Students should be grouped by achievement as much as possible. If such groupings don't have perfect racial balance, so what? What good does it do a ninth grader who is struggling with basic math to be placed in a pre-calc class? None. So people need to worry less about skin color and more about academic achievement.
    _____________
    As for the OP's original question, I attended a small private school. I think public schools may be better, but only if there are a reasonable number of students matching one's own IQ and/or achievement level. I read somewhere that bright students tend to actually achieve more in a competitive public school environment than the do in private school.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 9:25 AM GMT
    Ravensong saidI went to both private and public schools. Private schools are better.. But in the end achievement depends on the student.


    This! I went to Catholic school for one year, but the neighborhood I live in has a pretty decent public school system. All of my cousins in various parts of the city go to private schools, because my family views it as being safer. I know when family moved from the city to Long Island; the parents (more so the mother) were really hesitant, at first, about sending their 4 children to public school. When I was accepted to Fordham and asked my cousin about it, because she did a couple of semesters there, she had to make it a point that she graduated from Brown.

    Sometimes I think you can get lost in the crowd. In all honesty going to a bigger University and then coming back home to go to a local college (4 year college) I found I was given more attention at the smaller college. Maybe it was because I stood out -- big fish in a small pond. Either way I enjoy getting to know my professors. I flourish when I can get personal feedback from time to time and know what direction I'm heading towards -- I hated big lecture halls and being a number.

    Also consider other factors such as, will they do best in a female dominated college vs. male? What are they studying and is that school best qualified to teach them? Do they accept their undergraduates into their graduate programs? How much debt will they go into for a private college, which can easily be $80,000+ (room and board included) vs. a local college which is $15,000-$20,000, per year?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 12:23 PM GMT
    I went to a public school that had a horrible reputation as being bad academically. However, the teachers were great and we had plenty of students go on to college or were successful working right out of high school. Seems like at least one student every year goes to an Ivy League school.

    Bottom line is you get academically what you put into it, regardless of what the school is. I know plenty of students that went to "poor" high schools and graduated in great shape from an academic standpoint, and others that went to "great" high schools and weren't prepared for anything. Personally, I think talk about how bad public schools are is much ado about nothing. Students will get a fine education there if they put the work in. I currently hold a masters degree and have a job that I really like, so my high school prepared me just fine.

    I also believe that there are so many social and just real-life aspects you learn in a public school that you can't get in private school. You interact with students from so many different backgrounds, and you see and experience first hand some pretty intense real life issues, especially in the school that I went to. You just aren't exposed to a lot of these issues in a private school setting, and in a lot of ways it better prepares you for the real world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2013 2:17 PM GMT
    I went to a public school and did quite well, although I think the quality varies based on what town you are in.
  • Import

    Posts: 7193

    Oct 10, 2013 9:36 PM GMT
    A common theme I'm hearing in people's post are that public schools offer more exposure to racial diversity, which I dont think is true in this day and age.
    Perhaps "back in the day" yes....but today's private schools or at least a lot of them pride themselves on their diverse student bodies much like colleges and universities do.
    Private schools expose American students to many more international students, where as public school do not. Private schools are able to issue F1 student visas to any international student who goes through the steps. Public schools (primary schools/high schools not universities) are unable to issue student visas, therefore all students attending are either citizens or residents. This has been something I've learned a lot about in going to many private schools throughout California, the northeast and Florida.... that private schools expose their kids to more of a wordly thought and encourage their kids to think more about the world outside of their immediate neighborhood.


    annnnnd on a sidenote not trying to be shallow but private school kids are better looking and healthier in my opinion. Often there are more milfs and dilfs as well, just sayin. public school parents have to slog too hard to keep it together.



  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2013 1:01 AM GMT
    http://www.privateschools.com/private-vs-public.phtml
    Characteristic Public Schools Private Schools
    Diversity (Non-White) 45.1% 25.5%
    White 54.9% 74.5%
    Hispanic 21.5% 9.6%
    African-American 17.0% 9.8%
    Asian/Pacific Islander 5.0% 5.4%
    American Indian/Alaska Native 1.2% 0.6%


    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/42419004/ns/us_news-life/t/public-high-schools-woo-foreign-students-boost-ranks/
    Faced with declining enrollments and shrinking revenues, public school districts from Maine to California are seeking out students from overseas, particularly China, to attend their high schools.

    http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/types/types_1269.html
    ...under U.S. law. Student F-1 visas cannot be issued to persons seeking to enter the United States in order to attend a public primary/elementary school or a publicly funded adult education program....

    ...Dependents of a nonimmigrant visa holder of any type, including F-1, are not prohibited from attendance at either a public primary school...

    ...Secondary school attendance is limited to twelve months.

    F-1 secondary school students are required to pay the school the full cost of education by repaying the school system for the full, unsubsidized, per capita cost of providing the education to him or her....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2013 1:15 AM GMT
    I went to a public Jr High, HS and an awesome Public University (Berkeley), well as a transfer student! my vote goes to the public school system (it's sad to see all these budget cuts and shit), as far as being successful or not, it really depends on the student.

    I visited a couple of private schools back in my 20s say Stanford, Chapman...etc. A lot of those private colleges are smaller, Catholic /religious and basically if you have $$ or your parents are rich, you can basically get in, the same thing with international students enrolling rates. Lol, I see USC kids driving a Mercedes/BMW every time I go to downtown L.A. IMHO, Public schools, they support more low-income, racial diversity student bodies and give you $$ financial support more!

    There's like an annual survey ranking for every schools in the US, my school (UCB) consistently ranks at the top for most undergrad and grad programs! But then again, I believe that you should follow your passion, say if you have talent and want to be a singer/rockstar, who the hell needs a degree? Lol just go on the Voice and be a Rockstar or invent something genius like that facebook guy, lots of dropped out peeps are freaking successful in the real world.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    I went to public schools all through my educational career and turned out well.

    I think it really depends on the schools in question. There are some public schools that are excellent and some that are terrible.

    Advantages of private school? Probably. The private funding may allow for more robust and diverse activity/course offerings. In public schools, budget cuts can wreck havoc on arts and extra-curriculars.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2013 7:44 AM GMT
    K-8 parochial Lutheran Grade school
    9-12 parochial Lutheran High School

    Parochial school, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parochial_school
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheran_school
    When the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS) was founded in 1847, this tradition of Lutheran education was continued. The synod was started by twelve churches that operated a total of nineteen schools. Several of the churches operated a number of schools in the rural countryside so that students would not have to walk too far to school each day.

    In this case, when we say 'private', it really wasn't, anyone could have went as long as your family was involved in one of the local Lutheran churches, if your family was a member of a church and 'paid dues', half of ones education was paid for by the church affiliate

    School was local in the neighborhood and my parents were members of a group of Lutheran churches, my K-12 education was half paid for by one of these churches. Of course I had to play along, go to chapel every week, religion classes to graduate, not a school uniform like catholic but had to wear nice clothes, no blue jeans or sneekers except on designated 'jean days' which meant 'back to school' shopping wasn't like everyone else, we didn't have backpacks, we had to carry all books and supplies.

    Because religion took up so much time, there wasn't any 'real world' classes and it was before computers, no swimming pool, no wood or shop class, no auto class...we did have 'home economics' which basically was a class your way around a kitchen

    Classes were a bit more difficult than public school, if you were a 'c' student in Lutheran school, that is the equivalent of 'a-' or 'b+' in a public school, because of 12 years of religion indoctrination, I have a firm grip on right from wrong, but if I had to do it over again and wasn't forced to attend, I would pick a public school since 'the working world' is the focus on curriculum and not religion, since knowing how brainwashing it really was, served me no purpose in the real world except the "nice guys finish last" thing, I had to play 'catch up' when I got to public college, even then, Apple MacTosh was the computer back then which still used the 'tape' readers and floppy disk