Simple pill to prevent Alzheimer's?

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    Oct 10, 2013 4:01 AM GMT
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/alzheimers-breakthrough-british-scientists-pave-way-for-simple-pill-to-cure-disease-8869716.html
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:06 AM GMT
    I always thought it was a memory problem from being passive from thinking. Just sitting there and watching t.v for hours on end. Old people do that.

    The best way to prevent it is to read a book. Heck, even play video-games that require thinking.

    I actually looked up the definition and Alzheimer started in the 40's and 50's. Hey, guess what famous invention came around that time period? It was television. Ohhhhh, Youch!
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:18 AM GMT
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alzheimer


    History

    Alois Alzheimer's patient Auguste Deter in 1902. Hers was the first described case of what became known as Alzheimer's disease.
    The ancient Greek and Roman philosophers and physicians associated old age with increasing dementia.[1] It was not until 1901 that German psychiatrist Alois Alzheimer identified the first case of what became known as Alzheimer's disease in a fifty-year-old woman he called Auguste D. He followed her case until she died in 1906, when he first reported publicly on it.[196] During the next five years, eleven similar cases were reported in the medical literature, some of them already using the term Alzheimer's disease.[1] The disease was first described as a distinctive disease by Emil Kraepelin after suppressing some of the clinical (delusions and hallucinations) and pathological features (arteriosclerotic changes) contained in the original report of Auguste D.[197] He included Alzheimer's disease, also named presenile dementia by Kraepelin, as a subtype of senile dementia in the eighth edition of his Textbook of Psychiatry, published on July 15, 1910.[198]

    For most of the 20th century, the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease was reserved for individuals between the ages of 45 and 65 who developed symptoms of dementia. The terminology changed after 1977 when a conference on AD concluded that the clinical and pathological manifestations of presenile and senile dementia were almost identical, although the authors also added that this did not rule out the possibility that they had different causes.[199] This eventually led to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease independently of age.[200] The term senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) was used for a time to describe the condition in those over 65, with classical Alzheimer's disease being used for those younger. Eventually, the term Alzheimer's disease was formally adopted in medical nomenclature to describe individuals of all ages with a characteristic common symptom pattern, disease course, and neuropathology.[201]
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    Oct 10, 2013 4:24 AM GMT
    I got a source telling me that it's from the 1940's
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    Oct 10, 2013 5:10 AM GMT
    I'm sure there was a time when life expectancy wasn't long enough to experience many of the maladies that we commonly see today including this one.

    http://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/about/understanding/history.html

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    Oct 10, 2013 5:13 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree saidI'm sure there was a time when life expectancy wasn't long enough to experience many of the maladies that we commonly see today including this one.

    http://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/about/understanding/history.html



    But what does that have to do with what I said?
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    Oct 10, 2013 5:49 AM GMT
    The_Tango said
    freedomisntfree saidI'm sure there was a time when life expectancy wasn't long enough to experience many of the maladies that we commonly see today including this one.

    http://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/about/understanding/history.html



    But what does that have to do with what I said?


    Everything
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    Oct 12, 2013 4:16 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree saidI'm sure there was a time when life expectancy wasn't long enough to experience many of the maladies that we commonly see today including this one.

    http://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/about/understanding/history.html



    I agree. The down side to living longer is that there's a whole new crop of conditions / diseases that we encounter.