pre surgery workout

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    Oct 16, 2013 7:36 AM GMT
    I will have my entire right kidney removed and thus a gash along the centre of my stomach. I'm a three times a week gym person with a bit of aerobics and hiking added in.

    What exercises would be best for surgery and post-surgery recovery ( which is at least 4 weeks).
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    Oct 16, 2013 8:12 AM GMT
    You should probably discuss this with your doctor. He would know which types of exercises are safe to do.
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    Oct 16, 2013 8:42 AM GMT
    Post-op activities is a question best left to your surgeon. Along with consultation with a licensed physical therapist, who may or may not be directly working with you during your recovery period. Your doctor or the hospital should be able to advise you if PT will likely be a part of your discharge plan.

    I appreciate that someone accustomed to regular gym workouts may suffer withdrawals and depression when those are suspended for a time. But healing must be your first priority, following your doctor's instructions exactly, and rushing things could be counter-productive, actually delaying your surgical recovery.

    Ask your doctor about walking, mild jogging (probably not full-out running at first), and bicycling, stationary or road. Activities that involve your legs, rather than put excess strain on your mid-section. You could still get some aerobic value that way, and prevent losing some of the endorphin high you may be currently experiencing with your routine.

    Your doctor might also allow hiking, but ask about carrying any backpack, which would put strain on your torso, if not direct pressure near the incision site. You may find you are given a very limited weight lifting/carrying limit for any items during your first month or 2. And hiking might put you outside the time limit for such extended activities, especially at first.

    Be sure to ask these specific questions, because the doctors may assume someone your age is naturally more sedentary, whereas you sound more like a guy 20 years your junior. Make sure they understand this, to advise you accordingly.

    Again, I can't stress enough the need for your own surgeon, doctors and other health care professionals to be ultimately guiding you in this. Online we can only offer suggestions for you to explore with them.
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    Oct 16, 2013 3:27 PM GMT
    I think you guys missed the point of his question. He is asking about "pre" surgery workout. When I was face with a hernia surgery, I did a lot of pre surgery workouts. I think it does allow you to get through the surgery better. Plus I think you will recovery faster.

    After surgery I did take it easy, but I was active and moved around a lot. I think you will find that the doctors will want you to move, and not just lay in bed. But yes, you should follow their guidance for post surgery.

    I think you will find that being in shape, you will bounce back quickly. Good luck
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Oct 16, 2013 4:26 PM GMT
    I'm curious why you're having a mid line incision. Most nephrectomies I've seen (partial or total) are done in lateral position with the operating room table flexed to open up the operative side. You would have an incision from your flank toward mid abdomen, just below the rib cage. It can be done as a laparoscopic assisted procedure, also, which will give you a slightly smaller incision.

    I agree with Art. Talk to your surgeon and a PT pre op.
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    Oct 16, 2013 5:24 PM GMT
    I had a splenectomy - 9 inch gash. The pain immediately afterwards was so bad I'd walk laps with my IV in the hospital ward rather than attempt to sleep. I wasn't discharged for 6 days and would spend my hours in bed counting the tugboats on the East River to pass the time.

    Since movement remained key to my rehabilitation the doctor told me to resume lifting as soon as the staples were removed - within 10 days. I don't recall any exercises being off limits and remember Smith squats 11 days after surgery in my building's gym were surprisingly easy but getting from a standing to a lying position for benching (and vice versa) took 20 minutes. Exercise worked, unimpeded mobility returned within a few weeks.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Oct 16, 2013 6:22 PM GMT
    Go with the doctor and ask specifically to be set up with a physical therapist. Explain your gym habits and make sure you follow recommendations for recovery to the letter.

    I went through this at age 7, but was also affected by a major illness which required total bedrest. I am glad it was a long time ago, but things are doing well now. You should have eery confidence that things will work out well.

    It is most likely that being in good shape now will aid your recovery. Don't be too concerned about being back in the gym at the earliest possible moment. You will do well because you are going into it without the handicap of being in bad shape.
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    Oct 17, 2013 4:25 AM GMT
    Sam54 saidI will have my entire right kidney removed and thus a gash along the centre of my stomach. I'm a three times a week gym person with a bit of aerobics and hiking added in.

    What exercises would be best for surgery and post-surgery recovery ( which is at least 4 weeks).


    As others have said, a PT consultation is usually sent in for most surgeries, but that's at the discretion of the surgeon. If the surgeon does not suggest one, ask for one.

    Pre-surgery, the more conditioned you are, the faster your recovery. Because the abdominal muscles will be incised, making sure you have a strong core (TrA mostly!) would be advantageous.

    Post-op, it completely depends on the surgical method used and your surgeon's restrictions, some are more conservative than others. Best thing is to speak with your surgeon and PT.

    The incision site will depend on the particular kidney condition/disease. The approach can be from the abdomen, the flank, or even the back.
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    Oct 17, 2013 4:27 AM GMT
    I want to know why all you guys are loosing organs? icon_eek.gif
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    Oct 17, 2013 5:10 AM GMT
    starboard5 saidI'm curious why you're having a mid line incision. Most nephrectomies I've seen (partial or total) are done in lateral position with the operating room table flexed to open up the operative side. You would have an incision from your flank toward mid abdomen, just below the rib cage. It can be done as a laparoscopic assisted procedure, also, which will give you a slightly smaller incision.

    I agree with Art. Talk to your surgeon and a PT pre op.


    the head surgeon made clear it was removal of the entire kidney due to apple-size tumor (papillary renal cancer) sitting on artery thus bigger incision. Prior to biopsy they were thinking of lopping off only the upper third of the kidney.

    (No complaints, it's stage 1 + discovered by chance.)

    The question is what exercise regime would be best for PRE surgery given the tissues they will cut through etc. I'm not a doctor (of medicine)
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    Oct 17, 2013 5:16 AM GMT
    yoursweetguy said
    Sam54 saidI will have my entire right kidney removed and thus a gash along the centre of my stomach. I'm a three times a week gym person with a bit of aerobics and hiking added in.

    What exercises would be best for surgery and post-surgery recovery ( which is at least 4 weeks).


    As others have said, a PT consultation is usually sent in for most surgeries, but that's at the discretion of the surgeon. If the surgeon does not suggest one, ask for one.

    Pre-surgery, the more conditioned you are, the faster your recovery. Because the abdominal muscles will be incised, making sure you have a strong core (TrA mostly!) would be advantageous.

    Post-op, it completely depends on the surgical method used and your surgeon's restrictions, some are more conservative than others. Best thing is to speak with your surgeon and PT.

    The incision site will depend on the particular kidney condition/disease. The approach can be from the abdomen, the flank, or even the back.


    Thanks for the pointers! The head surgeon has told me he will do from the abdomen.
    What is TrA?
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Oct 17, 2013 5:26 AM GMT
    eagermuscle saidI had a splenectomy - 9 inch gash. The pain immediately afterwards was so bad I'd walk laps with my IV in the hospital ward rather than attempt to sleep. I wasn't discharged for 6 days and would spend my hours in bed counting the tugboats on the East River to pass the time.

    Since movement remained key to my rehabilitation the doctor told me to resume lifting as soon as the staples were removed - within 10 days. I don't recall any exercises being off limits and remember Smith squats 11 days after surgery in my building's gym were surprisingly easy but getting from a standing to a lying position for benching (and vice versa) took 20 minutes. Exercise worked, unimpeded mobility returned within a few weeks.


    Some doctors still neglect to provide adequate pain medication.
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    Oct 17, 2013 12:34 PM GMT
    Can't answer your question but want to wish you the best for the op, the recovery and prognosis.
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    Oct 17, 2013 3:28 PM GMT
    FRE0 said
    eagermuscle saidI had a splenectomy - 9 inch gash. The pain immediately afterwards was so bad I'd walk laps with my IV in the hospital ward rather than attempt to sleep. I wasn't discharged for 6 days and would spend my hours in bed counting the tugboats on the East River to pass the time.

    Since movement remained key to my rehabilitation the doctor told me to resume lifting as soon as the staples were removed - within 10 days. I don't recall any exercises being off limits and remember Smith squats 11 days after surgery in my building's gym were surprisingly easy but getting from a standing to a lying position for benching (and vice versa) took 20 minutes. Exercise worked, unimpeded mobility returned within a few weeks.


    Some doctors still neglect to provide adequate pain medication.

    Actually I was on a morphine drip. By day 4 of my hospitalization they upped the dose to the point where I was able to lie in bed long enough to watch part of an Elvis movie marathon. I remember thinking, high on that drip, "'Roustabout!' That man is a genuis!"



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    Oct 18, 2013 6:21 PM GMT
    Sam54 said
    yoursweetguy said
    Sam54 saidI will have my entire right kidney removed and thus a gash along the centre of my stomach. I'm a three times a week gym person with a bit of aerobics and hiking added in.

    What exercises would be best for surgery and post-surgery recovery ( which is at least 4 weeks).


    As others have said, a PT consultation is usually sent in for most surgeries, but that's at the discretion of the surgeon. If the surgeon does not suggest one, ask for one.

    Pre-surgery, the more conditioned you are, the faster your recovery. Because the abdominal muscles will be incised, making sure you have a strong core (TrA mostly!) would be advantageous.

    Post-op, it completely depends on the surgical method used and your surgeon's restrictions, some are more conservative than others. Best thing is to speak with your surgeon and PT.

    The incision site will depend on the particular kidney condition/disease. The approach can be from the abdomen, the flank, or even the back.


    Thanks for the pointers! The head surgeon has told me he will do from the abdomen.
    What is TrA?


    Sorry! TrA = Transverse Abdominis. So core work, e.g. planks with progressions, planks with feet/upper back on stability ball progressing from two legs to one leg, four point alternating arm/leg raises to same side leg/arm raises, etc. But you look like in good shape, so just keep on doing what you're doing.